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Europe Audiobooks in Travel

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LoveReading Top 10

  1. The Final Twist Audiobook The Final Twist
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  2. The Bomber Mafia: A Dream, a Temptation, and the Longest Night of the Second World War Audiobook The Bomber Mafia: A Dream, a Temptation, and the Longest Night of the Second World War
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  3. Soundtracks: The Surprising Solution to Overthinking Audiobook Soundtracks: The Surprising Solution to Overthinking
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  4. Win at Work and Succeed at Life: 5 Principles to Free Yourself from the Cult of Overwork Audiobook Win at Work and Succeed at Life: 5 Principles to Free Yourself from the Cult of Overwork
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  5. Left You Dead Audiobook Left You Dead
    5
  6. Protector: The epic new adventure through the battlefields of ancient Greece Audiobook Protector: The epic new adventure through the battlefields of ancient Greece
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  7. Because of You: The instant Sunday Times bestseller 2020 Audiobook Because of You: The instant Sunday Times bestseller 2020
    7
  8. The Wife Who Got a Life Audiobook The Wife Who Got a Life
    8
  9. Covet Audiobook Covet
    9
  10. The Power of Geography: Ten Maps That Reveal the Future of Our World Audiobook The Power of Geography: Ten Maps That Reveal the Future of Our World
    10
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The Ghetto: A Very Short Introduction Audiobook

The Ghetto: A Very Short Introduction

Author: Bryan Cheyette Narrator: Julian Elfer Release Date: November 2020

For three hundred years the ghetto defined Jewish culture in the late medieval and early modern period in Western Europe. In the nineteenth-century it was a free-floating concept which traveled to Eastern Europe and the United States. Eastern European 'ghettos', which enabled genocide, were crudely rehabilitated by the Nazis during World War Two as if they were part of a benign medieval tradition. In the United States, the word ghetto was routinely applied to endemic black ghettoization which has lasted from 1920 until the present. Outside of America 'the ghetto' has been universalized as the incarnation of class difference, or colonialism, or apartheid, and has been applied to segregated cities and countries throughout the world. In this Very Short Introduction Bryan Cheyette unpicks the extraordinarily complex layers of contrasting meanings that have accrued over five hundred years to ghettos, considering their different settings across the globe. He considers core questions of why and when urban, racial, and colonial ghettos have appeared, and who they contain. Exploring their various identities, he shows how different ghettos interrelate, or are contrasted, across time and space, or even in the same place.

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The Interest: How the British Establishment Resisted the Abolition of Slavery Audiobook

The Interest: How the British Establishment Resisted the Abolition of Slavery

Author: Michael Taylor Narrator: James Maccallum Release Date: November 2020

Brought to you by Penguin. For two hundred years, the abolition of slavery in Britain has been a cause for self-congratulation - but no longer. In 1807, Parliament outlawed the slave trade in the British Empire, but for the next quarter of a century, despite heroic and bloody rebellions, more than 700,000 people in the British colonies remained enslaved. And when a renewed abolitionist campaign was mounted, making slave ownership the defining political and moral issue of the day, emancipation was fiercely resisted by the powerful 'West India Interest'. Supported by nearly every leading figure of the British establishment - including Canning, Peel and Gladstone, The Times and Spectator - the Interest ensured that slavery survived until 1833 and that when abolition came at last, compensation worth billions in today's money was given not to the enslaved but to the slaveholders, entrenching the power of their families to shape modern Britain to this day. Drawing on major new research, this long-overdue and ground-breaking history provides a gripping narrative account of the tumultuous and often violent battle - between rebels and planters, between abolitionists and the pro-slavery establishment - that divided and scarred the nation during these years of upheaval. The Interest reveals the lengths to which British leaders went to defend the indefensible in the name of profit, showing that the ultimate triumph of abolition came at a bitter cost and was one of the darkest and most dramatic episodes in British history. © Michael Taylor 2020 (P) Penguin Audio 2020

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Ukraine: What Everyone Needs to Know Audiobook

Ukraine: What Everyone Needs to Know

Author: Serhy Yekelchyk Narrator: Joel Richards Release Date: November 2020

Ukraine's sudden prominence in American politics has compounded an already-widespread misunderstanding of what is actually happening in the nation. In the American media, Ukraine has come to signify an inherently corrupt place, rather than a real country struggling in the face of great challenges. Ukraine: What Everyone Needs to Know addresses Ukraine's relations with the West, particularly the United States, from the perspective of Ukrainians. The book explains how independent Ukraine fell victim to crony capitalism, how its people rebelled twice in the last two decades in the name of democracy and against corruption, and why Russia reacted so aggressively to the strivings of Ukrainians. Additionally, it looks at what we know about alleged Ukrainian interference in the 2016 US presidential election, the factors behind the stunning electoral victory of the political novice Volodymyr Zelensky, and the ways in which the events leading to the impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump have changed the Russia-Ukraine-US relationship. This volume is essential listening for anyone who wants to understand the forces that have shaped contemporary politics in this increasingly important part of Europe, as well as the international background of the impeachment proceedings in the US.

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Templars, The - Quiz Book: History - Myth - Legacy and 300 quiz questions to entertain your friends Audiobook

Templars, The - Quiz Book: History - Myth - Legacy and 300 quiz questions to entertain your friends

Author: Seb Giroux Narrator: Rick Simmonds Release Date: November 2020

What do you know about the Templars? This half page-turner and half puzzle book contains all the history of the famous Knights up until today as well as 300 questions in 12 quizzes to test your knowledge. Enough is known about the Knights Templar to satisfy historians. Enough is mysterious about the Knights Templar to satisfy the dreamers. We think we know everything about the Knights Templar… but do we? Who were they? How did a group of 9 men manage to rise to such power and wealth in just under 20 years? Did they discover a treasure? Or more likely, some secret and ancient knowledge that could have toppled the Church. There is such a legend surrounding the Templars that it has become difficult to separate pure myths from history. This book will help you do just that. In 12 chapters, you will come and discover who these soldiers of Christ really were, why they were fighting, how they came to be so rich and powerful. We will explore together what it was to be a Templar, how they lived, where they lived, their castles, their legacy. And finally, we will discover what happened after they disappeared, what is their connection to Freemasonry and whether modern Templars walk among us.   With 300 questions, this book will entertain you for hours and hours. Ever been asked to put together a team quiz at work? There is your little helper; these quizzes are already made for you. The book contains the following 12 chapters: - Historical Context – Jerusalem And Solomon's Temple - Christianity, Crusades And Chivalry - So It Begins - The First Knights Templar - Rise And Expansion - Influences, Power, And Struggles - Life As A Templar - Abrupt Endings - The Aftermath - Location, Location - Modern Resurgence - Myths - The Knights Templar In Arts, Movies, Novels

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A Short History of Ireland, 1500-2000 Audiobook

A Short History of Ireland, 1500-2000

Author: John Gibney Narrator: Gerard Doyle Release Date: November 2020

A brisk, concise, and readable overview of Irish history from the Protestant Reformation to the dawn of the twenty-first century. Five centuries of Irish history are explored in this informative and accessible volume. John Gibney proceeds from the beginning of Ireland's modern period and continues through to virtually the present day, offering an integrated overview of the island nation's cultural, political, and socioeconomic history. This succinct, scholarly study covers important historical events, including the Cromwellian conquest and settlement, the Great Famine, and the struggle for Irish independence. Gibney's book explores major themes such as Ireland's often contentious relationship with Britain, its place within the British Empire, the impact of the Protestant Reformation, the ongoing religious tensions it inspired, and the global reach of the Irish diaspora. This unique, wide-ranging work assimilates the most recent scholarship on a wide range of historical controversies, making it an essential addition to the library of any student of Irish studies.

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Fight for Lithuanian Independence, The: The History and Legacy of Lithuania in the 20th Century Audiobook

Fight for Lithuanian Independence, The: The History and Legacy of Lithuania in the 20th Century

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Colin Fluxman Release Date: November 2020

Modern day Lithuania is a small country bordering the Baltic Sea with a population of less than 3 million people, but despite its relative size, the nation has exerted an influential role on the history of the region. More recently, in the 20th century, Lithuania was caught between much larger powers in two world wars and then the Cold War. Along with neighbors Latvia and Estonia, Lithuania was one of the only states to truly break free of the Soviet Union when the latter dissolved in 1991. Now entrenched in the EU’s political and security bloc, Lithuania has seen unprecedented economic growth and prosperity, although Vilnius is still wary of the Russian giant on its doorstep.  Given everything going on around it, it should come as little surprise that Lithuania’s history during the 20th century revolved around the remarkable resilience of its people in the face of aggression and imperialism from first Russia, then Nazi Germany, then the Soviet Union. The Fight for Lithuanian Independence: The History and Legacy of Lithuania in the 20th Century examines the geopolitics of the region, Lithuania’s place in it, and the most important events in Lithuania’s recent history. 

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I, Marie Antoinette: Autobiographical one woman play about iconic queen of France Marie-Antoinette Audiobook

I, Marie Antoinette: Autobiographical one woman play about iconic queen of France Marie-Antoinette

Author: David Serero Narrator: Lisa Monde Release Date: November 2020

'I, MARIE ANTOINETTE' is a one woman theater play, written by David Serero, about the most iconic Queen of France: Marie Antoinette. Under the form of an autobiography, Marie Antoinette (1755-1793) tells her story from birth to death, to contemporary audience.

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Anglo-Saxon England Before the Norman Conquest: The History and Legacy of the Anglo-Saxons during th Audiobook

Anglo-Saxon England Before the Norman Conquest: The History and Legacy of the Anglo-Saxons during th

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Colin Fluxman Release Date: November 2020

Shortly after Emperor Hadrian came to power in the early 2nd century CE, he decided to seal off Scotland from Roman Britain with an ambitious wall stretching from sea to sea. To accomplish this, the wall had to be built from the mouth of the River Tyne – where Newcastle stands today – 80 Roman miles (76 miles or 122 kilometers) west to Bowness-on-Solway. The sheer scale of Hadrian’s Wall still impresses people today, but as the Western Roman Empire collapsed in the late 5th century, Hadrian’s Wall was abandoned and Roman control of the area broke down. Little is known of this period of British history, but soon the Anglo-Saxons – who had been harassing the Saxon Shore as pirates – showed up and began to settle the land, creating a patchwork of little kingdoms and starting a new era of British history. Several early medieval historians, writing well after the events, said the Anglo-Saxons were invited to Britain to defend the region from the northern tribes and ended up taking over. The Venerable Bede (672 or 673-735) said in his Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum (“Ecclesiastical History of the English People”) that in the year 449, “The British consulted what was to be done and where they should seek assistance to prevent or repel the cruel and frequent incursions of the northern nations. They all agreed with their king Vortigern to call over to their aid, from the parts beyond the sea, the Saxon nation. … The two first commanders are said to have been Hengist and Horsa.” However they came to control most of England, the Anglo-Saxons became the dominant power in the region for nearly 500 years, and the strength of their cultural influence could be felt even after William the Conqueror won the Battle of Hastings and became the first Norman ruler on the island. 

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Reisläufer, The: The History and Legacy of the Famous Swiss Mercenaries from the Middle Ages to the  Audiobook

Reisläufer, The: The History and Legacy of the Famous Swiss Mercenaries from the Middle Ages to the

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Daniel Houle Release Date: November 2020

In 1291, three cantons around Lake Lucerne—Schwyz, Uri, and Unterwalden—formed the so-called “Everlasting League” to counter outside aggression. This became the nucleus of what would develop into the Swiss Confederacy, and eventually the nation of Switzerland. Gradually, more and more cantons would join, ending their constant, low-level infighting and making the land more secure for trade. By the beginning of the 16th century, the Swiss Confederacy was comprised of 13 cantons, and this voluntary unification, without threats or conquest, was remarkable for the time. It was helped by the fact that the Swiss had a roughly similar culture, and that the region, with its ring of protective mountains, made the advantages of unification against a hostile outer world obvious to all. Few powers dared try to enter Swiss territory, and they generally met with disaster when they did, but ironically, this led to a new problem. The Swiss villages had always been prone to fighting and raiding one another, maintaining a constant low-level warfare that made the Swiss good fighters, and hotheaded young men wanted a chance to fight. At the same time, other areas, especially Italy, saw a growing need for mercenaries. Constantly trying to take land from their neighbors, Italian city-states were hampered by the fact that most of their men were busy tilling fields, engaging in trade and crafts, or building the cities and monuments that would become the wonders of the Renaissance. Moreover, the cutthroat politics of the city-states were such that rulers could not trust their own officers, who might murder them and take over their positions, something that happened on numerous occasions.

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Romans in Scotland, The: The History and Legacy of Ancient Rome’s Northernmost Campaigns Audiobook

Romans in Scotland, The: The History and Legacy of Ancient Rome’s Northernmost Campaigns

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Daniel Houle Release Date: November 2020

Shortly after Emperor Hadrian came to power in the early 2nd century CE, he decided to seal off Scotland from Roman Britain with an ambitious wall stretching from sea to sea. To accomplish this, the wall had to be built from the mouth of the River Tyne – where Newcastle stands today – 80 Roman miles (76 miles or 122 kilometers) west to Bowness-on-Solway. The sheer scale of the job still impresses people today, and Hadrian’s Wall has the advantage of being systematically studied and partially restored. Of course, the masterful architecture of the wall belied the fact that it was built for defense, because Scotland (known as Caledonia to the Romans) was never fully conquered or incorporated into the Roman Empire, a fact that many modern Scots remain quite proud of today. While the Romans made several efforts to subdue Scotland, it is not entirely clear whether their failure to complete the subjugation of the northern part of the British Isles was due to the ferocity of the Caledonian/Pictish tribesmen or whether the Romans simply came to the conclusion that the region had far too little to offer in the way of resources (either minerals, metals, or slaves) to warrant repeated major campaigns. Scotland in the 1st century CE had no settlements of any size, so profitable trade was not easy to establish, and so, did not offer any major motivation for military conquest. A further disincentive to any Roman general looking to achieve a decisive or speedy military victory was the terrain. Unlike much of England which, although forested, was relatively flat and so allowed for roads to be built, Scotland was both wooded and mountainous.  The lack of settlement centers also made it difficult for the Romans to operate as they had done throughout much of the rest of Europe (including southern Britain). Their tactics normally involved occupying the major population centers, fortifying them, and then Romanizing them.

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Windrush Scandal, The: The History of the Modern Controversy and Race Relations in the British Empir Audiobook

Windrush Scandal, The: The History of the Modern Controversy and Race Relations in the British Empir

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Colin Fluxman Release Date: November 2020

 On the morning of June 22, 1948, the HMT Empire Windrush, a repurposed German troopship, drew up alongside the Tilbury docks, lowering its gangplanks onto the wide, cobbled quays. To the casual interest of the dockworkers, a small army of well-dressed, luggage laden blacks stepped onto the shores of England, looking around for the first time at their new home. Most originated from Kingston, the capital of the British island colony of Jamaica, with a few others from Trinidad and a handful of other British Caribbean dependencies. These were the men and women who led the vanguard of what would come to be known as the Windrush Generation, the first substantial wave of non-white immigration to the British Isles from the outer marches of the Empire. Ultimately, between 1948 and 1970, more than half a million souls would migrate to the United Kingdom from the Caribbean and other non-white Commonwealth countries, establishing the bedrock of the British black community and prompting the first ripples of racial discomfort that would conclude in the infamous Windrush Scandal of 2018.   The issue of race in the British Empire is as complex as the history of the British Empire itself. The origins of the British Empire lie in the settlement of North America and the Caribbean, both of which led to complex intersections of imperialism, commerce and race. While the first European encounters with the New World were Spanish, the British arrived on the scene in a permanent way with the establishment of a General Assembly of the Leeward Islands in 1674, after which, in a complex evolution in competition and conflict with other European trading powers, the British West Indies finally comprised the British Leeward Islands, the British Windward Islands, Jamaica, and other colonies such as the Cayman Islands, British Honduras and the Turks and Caicos Islands.

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A Journal of the Plague Year Audiobook

A Journal of the Plague Year

Author: Daniel Defoe Narrator: Shea Taylor Release Date: November 2020

"Another plague year would reconcile all these differences; a close conversing with death, or with diseases that threaten death, would scum off the gall from our tempers, remove the animosities among us, and bring us to see with differing eyes than those which we looked on things with before." In 1665, London was struck by the bubonic plague, an epidemic that was the last major instance of the bubonic plague in England. This instance of the plague killed 100,000 people over a year and a half, and was transmitted through rats that ran through the city. A Journal of the Plague Year was presented as an eyewitness account of the epidemic through the eyes of Londoners, though Daniel DeFoe was only a child during the plague. This book was likely based on the journals and writings of his uncle, but is written with factual specificity and authority that place it among other contemporary accounts of the year. Whether it should be called fiction or nonfiction has been widely debated due to its astonishing amount of factual details, but its ultimate fictitious nature of the authorship. This journal, whether considered fact or fiction, remains relevant centuries later in a world experiencing similar events and casualties. The words within the journal echo the same sentiments as those experiencing the modern pandemic have felt and expressed. Delving into the observations of the past generations gives current readers a sense of shared suffering through the centuries, and may impart retroactive wisdom that is remarkably relevant for current times.

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