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Europe Audiobooks in Travel

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LoveReading Top 10

  1. Hello, Summer Audiobook Hello, Summer
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  2. The Court of Miracles Audiobook The Court of Miracles
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  3. The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes (A Hunger Games Novel) Audiobook The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes (A Hunger Games Novel)
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  4. Whiskey Beach Audiobook Whiskey Beach
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  5. The Room Where It Happened: A White House Memoir Audiobook The Room Where It Happened: A White House Memoir
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  6. Find the Good: Unexpected Life Lessons From a Small-Town Obituary Writer Audiobook Find the Good: Unexpected Life Lessons From a Small-Town Obituary Writer
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  7. Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You: A Remix of the National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Be Audiobook Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You: A Remix of the National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Be
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  8. Between the World and Me Audiobook Between the World and Me
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  9. The Beekeeper of Aleppo: A moving testament to the human spirit Audiobook The Beekeeper of Aleppo: A moving testament to the human spirit
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  10. Cross My Heart Audiobook Cross My Heart
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Cumans, The: The History of the Medieval Turkic Nomads Who Fought the Mongols and Rus’ in Eastern Eu Audiobook

Cumans, The: The History of the Medieval Turkic Nomads Who Fought the Mongols and Rus’ in Eastern Eu

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Colin Fluxman Release Date: March 2020

“Let us begin this narration, brethren, from the old times of Vladimir to this present time of Igor, who strengthened his mind with courage, who quickened his heart with valor and, thus imbued with martial spirit, led his valiant regiments against the Kuman land in defense of the Russian land.” – The Tale of Igor’s Campaign Before the Mongols rode across the steppes of Asia and Eastern Europe, the Cumans were a major military and cultural force that monarchs from China to Hungary and from Russia to the Byzantine Empire faced, often losing armies and cities in the process. The Cumans were a tribe of Turkic nomads who rode the steppes looking for plunder and riches, but they rarely stayed long after they got what they wanted. From the late 9th century until the arrival of the Mongols in 1223, there was virtually nothing that could be done to stop the Cumans. Old Russian chronicles, Byzantine texts, Western European chronicles, and travel diaries of Islamic scholars all reveal that the Cumans were a threat to any kingdom in their path. Some kingdoms chose to fight the Cumans and often suffered heavy destruction, while others believed buying them off was the more reasonable course of action. The latter course often brought them into intimate contact with the most powerful kingdoms of medieval Eastern Europe before the Cumans were eventually replaced by the Mongols, with the remaining Cumans dispersing and integrating into various European and central Asian kingdoms in the 13th century. Many Cumans joined the Mongol Golden Horde and later became Muslims, while some helped found dynasties in Bulgaria, Hungary, and Romania.

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Reckonings: Legacies of Nazi Persecution and the Quest for Justice Audiobook

Reckonings: Legacies of Nazi Persecution and the Quest for Justice

Author: Mary Fulbrook Narrator: Christa Lewis Release Date: February 2020

Mary Fulbrook's encompassing book explores the lives of individuals across a full spectrum of suffering and guilt, each one capturing one small part of the greater story. Using 'reckoning' in the widest possible sense to evoke how the consequences of violence have expanded almost infinitely through time. Fulbrook exposes the disjuncture between official myths about 'dealing with the past' and the extent to which the vast majority of Nazi perpetrators evaded responsibility. In the successor states to the Third Reich-East Germany, West Germany, and Austria-prosecution varied widely. Communist East Germany pursued Nazi criminals and handed down severe sentences; West Germany, caught between facing up to the past and seeking to draw a line under it, tended toward selective justice and reintegration of former Nazis; and Austria made nearly no reckoning at all until the mid-1980s, when news broke about Austrian presidential candidate Kurt Waldheim's past. The continuing battle with the legacies of Nazism in the private sphere was often at odds with public remembrance and memorials.

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Dresden: The Fire and the Darkness Audiobook

Dresden: The Fire and the Darkness

Author: Sinclair Mckay Narrator: Leighton Pugh Release Date: February 2020

Brought to by Penguin. In February 1945 the Allies obliterated Dresden, the 'Florence of the Elbe'. Explosive bombs weighing over 1,000 lbs fell every seven and a half seconds and an estimated 25,000 people were killed. Was Dresden a legitimate military target or was the bombing a last act of atavistic mass murder in a war already won? From the history of the city to the attack itself, conveyed in a minute-by-minute account from the first of the flares to the flames reaching almost a mile high - the wind so searingly hot that the lungs of those in its path were instantly scorched - through the eerie period of reconstruction, bestselling author Sinclair McKay creates a vast canvas and brings it alive with touching human detail. Along the way we encounter, for example, a Jewish woman who thought the English bombs had been sent from heaven, novelist Kurt Vonnegut who wrote that the smouldering landscape was like walking on the surface of the moon, and 15-year-old Winfried Bielss, who, having spent the evening ushering refugees, wanted to get home to his stamp collection. He was not to know that there was not enough time. Impeccably researched and deeply moving, McKay uses never-before-seen sources to relate the untold stories of civilians and vividly conveys the texture of life in a decimated city. Dresden is invoked as a byword for the illimitable cruelties of war, but with the ever-lengthening distance of time, it is now possible to approach this subject with a much clearer gaze, less occluded with the weight of prejudice in either direction, and with a keener interest in the sorts of lives that ordinary people lived and lost, or tried to rebuild. From general and individual morality in war to the raw, primal instinct for survival, through the seemingly unstoppable gravity of mass destruction and the manipulation of memory, this is a master historian at work. 'Extraordinary . . . a remarkably faithful account' Guardian on The Secret Life of Bletchley Park 'Painstakingly researched and fascinating' John Harding, Daily Mail on The Secret Listeners 'Lucid, well-researched and rich in detail' John Preston, Daily Mail on The Spies of Winter 'Fascinating, riveting, unsettling, and wonderfully rich in period detail' Craig Brown, Mail on Sunday on Mile End Murder © Sinclair McKay 2020 (P) Penguin Audio 2020

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1000 Years of Annoying the French Audiobook

1000 Years of Annoying the French

Author: Stephen Clarke Narrator: Justin Edwards Release Date: February 2020

Brought to you by Penguin. Was the Battle of Hastings a French victory? Non! William the Conqueror was Norman and hated the French. Were the Brits really responsible for the death of Joan of Arc? Non! The French sentenced her to death for wearing trousers. Was the guillotine a French invention? Non! It was invented in Yorkshire. Ten centuries' worth of French historical 'facts' bite the dust as Stephen Clarke looks at what has really been going on since 1066 ... © Stephen Clarke 2010 (P) Penguin Audio 2020

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First to Fight: The Polish War 1939 Audiobook

First to Fight: The Polish War 1939

Author: Roger Moorhouse Narrator: Roger Moorhouse Release Date: February 2020

Brought to you by Penguin. 'This deeply researched, very well-written and penetrating book will be the standard work on the subject for many years to come' - Andrew Roberts, author of Churchill: Walking with Destiny The Second World War began on 1 September 1939, when German tanks, trucks and infantry crossed the Polish border, and the Luftwaffe began bombing Poland's cities. The Polish army fought bravely but could not withstand an attacker superior in numbers and technology; and when the Red Army invaded from the east - as agreed in the pact Hitler had concluded with Stalin - the country's fate was sealed. Poland was the first to fight the German aggressor; it would be the first to suffer the full murderous force of Nazi persecution. By the end of the Second World War, one in five of its people had perished. The Polish campaign is the forgotten story of the Second World War. Despite prefacing many of that conflict's later horrors - the wanton targeting of civilians, indiscriminate bombing and ethnic cleansing - it is little understood, and most of what we think we know about it is Nazi propaganda, such as the myth of Polish cavalry charging German tanks with their lances. In truth, Polish forces put up a spirited defence, in the expectation that they would be assisted by their British and French allies. That assistance never came. First to Fight is the first history of the Polish war for almost half a century. Drawing on letters, memoirs and diaries by generals and politicians, soldiers and civilians from all sides, Roger Moorhouse's dramatic account of the military events is entwined with a tragic human story of courage and suffering, and a dark tale of diplomatic betrayal. © Roger Moorhouse 2019 (P) Penguin Audio 2020

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The Persian Expedition Audiobook

The Persian Expedition

Author: Xenophon Narrator: David Timson Release Date: February 2020

In The Persian Expedition (also known as The March of the Ten Thousand and Anabasis), Xenophon, a disciple of Socrates, relates his experiences of fighting with the Greek mercenary army ‘The Ten Thousand’ in Persia, and how he led them back to the safety of the Black Sea coast. Seeking to depose his brother Artaxerxes and take his place upon the Persian throne, Cyrus the Younger leads the 10,000 mercenaries on a dangerous campaign deep into the heart of Persia. There Cyrus is killed and his generals overthrown, leaving a young Xenophon to lead the army on its treacherous journey home. Snowy mountains, wide rivers, violent blizzards and hostile tribes obstruct their way, testing Xenophon’s leadership and his soldiers’ perseverance to the extreme.

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Difficult Women: A History of Feminism in 11 Fights Audiobook

Difficult Women: A History of Feminism in 11 Fights

Author: Helen Lewis Narrator: Helen Lewis Release Date: February 2020

Brought to you by Penguin. Well-behaved women don’t make history: difficult women do. Helen Lewis argues that feminism’s success is down to complicated, contradictory, imperfect women, who fought each other as well as fighting for equal rights. Too many of these pioneers have been whitewashed or forgotten in our modern search for feel-good, inspirational heroines. It’s time to reclaim the history of feminism as a history of difficult women. In this book, you’ll meet the working-class suffragettes who advocated bombings and arson; the princess who discovered why so many women were having bad sex; the pioneer of the refuge movement who became a men’s rights activist; the ‘striker in a sari’ who terrified Margaret Thatcher; the wronged Victorian wife who definitely wasn’t sleeping with the prime minister; and the lesbian politician who outraged the country. Taking the story up to the present with the twenty-first-century campaign for abortion services, Helen Lewis reveals the unvarnished – and unfinished – history of women’s rights. Drawing on archival research and interviews, Difficult Women is a funny, fearless and sometimes shocking narrative history, which shows why the feminist movement has succeeded – and what it should do next. The battle is difficult, and we must be difficult too. © Helen Lewis 2020 (P) Penguin Audio 2020

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Imperial Scramble for the Nile, The: The History of the Conflict Between the British and French for  Audiobook

Imperial Scramble for the Nile, The: The History of the Conflict Between the British and French for

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Daniel Houle Release Date: February 2020

Even after the British took control of Egypt, knowledge about the Nile remained sparse, most importantly the source of the river, and exploration all over the continent took place among adventurers of various nationalities. Other countries also sought to get a foothold on the continent, to the extent that near the end of the 19th century, Otto von Bismarck, the German chancellor, brought the plenipotentiaries of all major powers of Europe together to deal with Africa's colonization in such a manner as to avoid provocation of war. This event, known as the Berlin Conference of 1884-1885, galvanized a phenomenon that came to be known as the Scramble for Africa. The conference established two fundamental rules for European seizure of Africa. The first of these was that no recognition of annexation would granted without evidence of a practical occupation, and the second, that a practical occupation would be deemed unlawful without a formal appeal for protection made on behalf of a territory by its leader, a plea that must be committed to paper in the form of a legal treaty. This began a rush, spearheaded mainly by European commercial interests in the form of Chartered Companies, to penetrate the African interior and woo its leadership with guns, trinkets and alcohol, and having thus obtained their marks or seals upon spurious treaties, begin establishing boundaries of future European African colonies. The ease with which this was achieved was due to the fact that, at that point, traditional African leadership was disunited, and the people had just staggered back from centuries of concussion inflicted by the slave trade. Thus, to usurp authority, to intimidate an already broken society, and to play one leader against the other was a diplomatic task so childishly simple, the matter was wrapped up, for the most part, in less than a decade.

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The Waning of the Middle Ages Audiobook

The Waning of the Middle Ages

Author: Johan Huizinga Narrator: Jean Brassard Release Date: January 2020

A classic study of the forms of life, thought and art in France and the Netherlands in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, it is the remarkable work of Dutch historian Johan Huizinga. Huizinga brings a depth of knowledge, commentary and insight into the way of life, spirit and artistic expression of medieval times. For Huizinga, the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries were much more than the prelude to a new period in history - the Renaissance. They were a completion, culmination and maturity of medieval life and thought.

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The Years Audiobook

The Years

Author: Annie Ernaux Narrator: Anna Bentinck Release Date: January 2020

The Years is a personal narrative of the period of 1941 to 2006 told through the lens of memory, impressions past and present-even projections into the future-photos, books, songs, radio, television, and decades of advertising and headlines, contrasted with intimate conflicts and written notes from six decades of diaries. Local dialect, words of the time, slogans, brands, and names for ever-proliferating objects are given a voice here. The voice we recognize as the author's continually dissolves and re-emerges. Ernaux makes the passage of time palpable. Time itself, inexorable, narrates its own course, consigning all other narrators to anonymity. A new kind of autobiography emerges, at once subjective and impersonal, private and collective. On its 2008 publication in France, The Years came as a surprise. Although Ernaux had, for years, been hailed as a beloved bestselling and award-winning author, The Years was in many ways a departure: both an intimate memoir written by entire generations and a story of generations telling a very personal story.

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Mengele: Unmasking the 'Angel of Death' Audiobook

Mengele: Unmasking the 'Angel of Death'

Author: David G. Marwell Narrator: Paul Woodson Release Date: January 2020

Perhaps the most notorious war criminal of all time, Josef Mengele was the embodiment of bloodless efficiency and passionate devotion to a grotesque worldview. Aided by the role he has assumed in works of popular culture, Mengele has come to symbolize the Holocaust itself as well as the failure of justice that allowed countless Nazi murderers and their accomplices to escape justice. As chief of investigative research at the Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations in the 1980s, David G. Marwell worked on the Mengele case. Drawing on his own experience as well as new scholarship and sources, Marwell examines Mengele's life and career. He chronicles Mengele's university studies; his wartime service both in frontline combat and at Auschwitz, where his 'selections' sent innumerable innocents to their deaths and his 'scientific' pursuits traumatized or killed countless more; and his postwar flight from Europe and refuge in South America. Mengele describes the international search for the Nazi doctor in 1985 that ended in a cemetery in Sao Paulo, Brazil, and the dogged forensic investigation that produced overwhelming evidence that Mengele had died-but failed to convince those who, arguably, most wanted him dead. This is the riveting story of science without limits, escape without freedom, and resolution without justice.

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Balkan Ghosts: A Journey Through History Audiobook

Balkan Ghosts: A Journey Through History

Author: Robert D. Kaplan Narrator: Nigel Patterson Release Date: January 2020

From the assassination that triggered World War I to the ethnic warfare in Serbia, Bosnia, and Croatia, the Balkans have been the crucible of the twentieth century, the place where terrorism and genocide first became tools of policy. Chosen as one of the Best Books of the Year by the New York Times, and greeted with critical acclaim as 'the most insightful and timely work on the Balkans to date'-The Boston Globe, Kaplan's prescient, enthralling, and often chilling political travelogue is already a modern classic. This new edition of the Balkan Ghost includes six opinion pieces written by Robert Kaplan about the Balkans between 1996 and 2000 beginning just after the implementation of the Dayton Peace Accords and ending after the conclusion of the Kosovo war, with the removal of Slobodan Milosevic from power.

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