LoveReading

Becoming a member of the LoveReading community is free.

No catches, no fine print just unadulterated book loving, with your favourite books saved to your own digital bookshelf.

New members get entered into our monthly draw to win £100 to spend in your local bookshop Plus lots lots more…

Find out more

Europe Audiobooks in Travel

Browse Europe audiobooks, listen to samples and when you're ready head over to Audiobooks.com where you can get 3 FREE audiobooks on us

LoveReading Top 10

  1. Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man Audiobook Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man
    1
  2. The Sin Eater Audiobook The Sin Eater
    2
  3. Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You: A Remix of the National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Be Audiobook Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You: A Remix of the National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Be
    3
  4. Near Dark: A Thriller Audiobook Near Dark: A Thriller
    4
  5. Coming Home to Island House Audiobook Coming Home to Island House
    5
  6. Outsider: A Novel of Suspense Audiobook Outsider: A Novel of Suspense
    6
  7. What You Wish For: A Novel Audiobook What You Wish For: A Novel
    7
  8. The Alchemist Audiobook The Alchemist
    8
  9. Relationship Goals: How to Win at Dating, Marriage, and Sex Audiobook Relationship Goals: How to Win at Dating, Marriage, and Sex
    9
  10. Tempt Me Audiobook Tempt Me
    10
Filter
The Last Princess Audiobook

The Last Princess

Author: Matthew Dennison Narrator: Matthew Dennison Release Date: March 2020

Beatrice Mary Victoria Feodore, later Princess Henry of Battenberg, was the last-born - in 1866 - of Victoria and Albert's children, and she would outlive all of her siblings to die as recently as 1944. Her childhood coincided with her mother's extended period of mourning for her prematurely deceased husband, a circumstance which may have contributed to Victoria's determination to keep her youngest daughter as close to her as possible. She would eventually marry Prince Henry of Battenberg in 1885, but only after overcoming her mother's opposition to their union. Beatrice remained Queen Victoria's favourite among her five daughters, and became her mother's constant companion and later her literary executor, spending the years that followed Victoria's death in 1901 editing her mother's journals and voluminous correspondence. Matthew Dennison's elegantly written biography restores Beatrice to her rightful place as a key figure in the history of the Victorian age, and paints a touching and revealing portrait of the life and family of Britain's second-longest-reigning monarch.

Show more
The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Middle Ages: Explore the Turbulent Times and Events of This Extrao Audiobook

The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Middle Ages: Explore the Turbulent Times and Events of This Extrao

Author: M.A. Timothy C. Hall Narrator: Tom Alexander Release Date: March 2020

Shed some light on one of history's darkest periods. The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Middle Ages gives listeners the beginning, middle, and end of the era, starting with the fall of the Roman Empire in the year 550 and ending with the Renaissance in 1500, and covers some uncomfortable similarities between the so-called 'Dark Ages' and today's 'modern world'. This is a fascinating, fact-filled audiobook that delivers more than a thousand years of history in easy-to-understand chapters. Complete with a timeline, a who's who, and more. © 2009 Timothy C. Hall © 2020 DK Audio

Show more
English Bulldog and French Poodle in Africa, The: The History of the Imperial Conflicts Between Fran Audiobook

English Bulldog and French Poodle in Africa, The: The History of the Imperial Conflicts Between Fran

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Daniel Houle Release Date: March 2020

Even after the British took control of Egypt, knowledge about the Nile remained sparse, most importantly the source of the river, and exploration all over the continent took place among adventurers of various nationalities. Other countries also sought to get a foothold on the continent, to the extent that near the end of the 19th century, Otto von Bismarck, the German chancellor, brought the plenipotentiaries of all major powers of Europe together to deal with Africa's colonization in such a manner as to avoid provocation of war. This event, known as the Berlin Conference of 1884-1885, galvanized a phenomenon that came to be known as the Scramble for Africa. The conference established two fundamental rules for European seizure of Africa. The first of these was that no recognition of annexation would granted without evidence of a practical occupation, and the second, that a practical occupation would be deemed unlawful without a formal appeal for protection made on behalf of a territory by its leader, a plea that must be committed to paper in the form of a legal treaty. This began a rush, spearheaded mainly by European commercial interests in the form of Chartered Companies, to penetrate the African interior and woo its leadership with guns, trinkets and alcohol, and having thus obtained their marks or seals upon spurious treaties, begin establishing boundaries of future European African colonies. The ease with which this was achieved was due to the fact that, at that point, traditional African leadership was disunited, and the people had just staggered back from centuries of concussion inflicted by the slave trade. Thus, to usurp authority, to intimidate an already broken society, and to play one leader against the other was a diplomatic task so childishly simple, the matter was wrapped up, for the most part, in less than a decade. Even at that stage, however, the countries would keep jostling for position in Africa against each other.

Show more
Cat and Mouse on the Niger: The History of the Competition Between the British and French for Contro Audiobook

Cat and Mouse on the Niger: The History of the Competition Between the British and French for Contro

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Daniel Houle Release Date: March 2020

'They have soldiers. We only have arguments.' – French Foreign Minister Théophile Delcassé Near the end of the 19th century, Otto von Bismarck, the German chancellor, brought the plenipotentiaries of all major powers of Europe together to deal with Africa's colonization in such a manner as to avoid provocation of war. This event, known as the Berlin Conference of 1884-1885, galvanized a phenomenon that came to be known as the Scramble for Africa. The conference established two fundamental rules for European seizure of Africa. The first of these was that no recognition of annexation would granted without evidence of a practical occupation, and the second, that a practical occupation would be deemed unlawful without a formal appeal for protection made on behalf of a territory by its leader, a plea that must be committed to paper in the form of a legal treaty. This began a rush, spearheaded mainly by European commercial interests in the form of Chartered Companies, to penetrate the African interior and woo its leadership with guns, trinkets and alcohol, and having thus obtained their marks or seals upon spurious treaties, begin establishing boundaries of future European African colonies. The ease with which this was achieved was due to the fact that, at that point, traditional African leadership was disunited, and the people had just staggered back from centuries of concussion inflicted by the slave trade. Thus, to usurp authority, to intimidate an already broken society, and to play one leader against the other was a diplomatic task so childishly simple, the matter was wrapped up, for the most part, in less than a decade. Even at that stage, however, the countries would keep jostling for position in Africa against each other, attempting to snap up more land and consolidate it. As such, the scramble kept going at a fevered pitch until the outbreak of World War I.

Show more
Journey to a Revolution: A Personal Memoir and History of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 Audiobook

Journey to a Revolution: A Personal Memoir and History of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956

Author: Michael Korda Narrator: Julian Elfer Release Date: March 2020

The Hungarian Revolution of 1956 was perhaps the most dramatic single event of the Cold War and a major turning point in history. Though it ended unsuccessfully, the spontaneous uprising of Hungarians against their country's Communist party and the Soviet occupation forces in the wake of Stalin's death demonstrated to the world at large the failure of Communism. In full view of the Western media-and therefore the world-the Russians were obliged to use force on a vast scale to subdue armed students, factory workers, and intellectuals in the streets of a major European capital. In October 1956, Michael Korda and three fellow Oxford undergraduates traveled to Budapest in a beat-up Volkswagen to bring badly needed medicine to the hospitals-and to participate, at street level, in one of the great battles of the postwar era. Journey to a Revolution is at once history and a compelling memoir-the author's riveting account of the course of the revolution, from its heroic beginnings to the sad martyrdom of its end.

Show more
War on the Eastern Front: The German Soldier in Russia 1941-1945 Audiobook

War on the Eastern Front: The German Soldier in Russia 1941-1945

Author: James Lucas Narrator: Chris Macdonnell Release Date: March 2020

Dawn on Sunday, June 22, 1941 saw the opening onslaughts of Operation Barbarossa as German forces stormed forward into the Soviet Union. Few of them were to survive the five long years of bitter struggle. A posting to the Eastern Front during the Second World War was rightly regarded with dread by the German soldiers. They were faced by the unremitting hostility of the climate, the people and even, at times, their own leadership. They saw epic battles such as Stalingrad and Kursk, and yet it was a daily war of attrition which ultimately proved fatal for Hitler's ambition and the German military machine. In this classic account leading military historian James Lucas examines different aspects of the fighting, from war in the trenches to a bicycle-mounted antitank unit fighting against the oncoming Russian hordes. Told through the experiences of the German soldiers who endured these nightmarish years of warfare, War on the Eastern Front is a unique record of this cataclysmic campaign.

Show more
Catalonia and Basque Country: The History and Legacy of the Autonomous Communities in Spain Audiobook

Catalonia and Basque Country: The History and Legacy of the Autonomous Communities in Spain

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Colin Fluxman Release Date: March 2020

Shaped like an uneven triangle, Catalonia is comprised of four provinces that occupy an area of 12,390 square miles: Girona, Barcelona, Tarragona and Lleida. Catalonia also has a variety of different kinds of communities surrounding it, as its northern neighbors include the powerful country of France and the tiny nation of Andorra. To the south it has the autonomous community of Valencia, to the west is the autonomous community of Aragon, and on the east, it borders the Mediterranean Sea. Furthermore, there are natural boundaries that serve to divide Catalonia from its neighbors, namely the Pyrenees mountains, which separate it from France, and the pre-Pyrenees and the Ebro River basin, which mark its border with Aragon. It is home to several main rivers, including the Ter, Llobregat, and the Ebro, all of which end in the Mediterranean Sea. It would not be a stretch to say that for a very tiny geographical territory (just 20,747 square kilometers), the Basque Country has inspired a plethora of intense stereotypes. Some of these stereotypes have been cast upon its people from the outside while others have been strategically propagated by the people themselves. For such a small area of land that is home to only 3,000,000 people, the Basque Country is anything but small in terms of its history which is why opinions about its people are so intense, so consequential, and so contradictory. The Basque people have been called “the people who sing and dance at the foot of the Pyrenees,” a description that evokes not only their geographical location but also their strong folk traditions. Those words, said by the famous French writer Victor Hugo, infuriate the Basque people to this day. They have also been described pejoratively as “Europe’s aboriginals,” a reference to the age-old status of their culture which has led many people to fetishize them and their language as ancient.

Show more
Cumans, The: The History of the Medieval Turkic Nomads Who Fought the Mongols and Rus’ in Eastern Eu Audiobook

Cumans, The: The History of the Medieval Turkic Nomads Who Fought the Mongols and Rus’ in Eastern Eu

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Colin Fluxman Release Date: March 2020

“Let us begin this narration, brethren, from the old times of Vladimir to this present time of Igor, who strengthened his mind with courage, who quickened his heart with valor and, thus imbued with martial spirit, led his valiant regiments against the Kuman land in defense of the Russian land.” – The Tale of Igor’s Campaign Before the Mongols rode across the steppes of Asia and Eastern Europe, the Cumans were a major military and cultural force that monarchs from China to Hungary and from Russia to the Byzantine Empire faced, often losing armies and cities in the process. The Cumans were a tribe of Turkic nomads who rode the steppes looking for plunder and riches, but they rarely stayed long after they got what they wanted. From the late 9th century until the arrival of the Mongols in 1223, there was virtually nothing that could be done to stop the Cumans. Old Russian chronicles, Byzantine texts, Western European chronicles, and travel diaries of Islamic scholars all reveal that the Cumans were a threat to any kingdom in their path. Some kingdoms chose to fight the Cumans and often suffered heavy destruction, while others believed buying them off was the more reasonable course of action. The latter course often brought them into intimate contact with the most powerful kingdoms of medieval Eastern Europe before the Cumans were eventually replaced by the Mongols, with the remaining Cumans dispersing and integrating into various European and central Asian kingdoms in the 13th century. Many Cumans joined the Mongol Golden Horde and later became Muslims, while some helped found dynasties in Bulgaria, Hungary, and Romania.

Show more
Reckonings: Legacies of Nazi Persecution and the Quest for Justice Audiobook

Reckonings: Legacies of Nazi Persecution and the Quest for Justice

Author: Mary Fulbrook Narrator: Christa Lewis Release Date: February 2020

Mary Fulbrook's encompassing book explores the lives of individuals across a full spectrum of suffering and guilt, each one capturing one small part of the greater story. Using 'reckoning' in the widest possible sense to evoke how the consequences of violence have expanded almost infinitely through time. Fulbrook exposes the disjuncture between official myths about 'dealing with the past' and the extent to which the vast majority of Nazi perpetrators evaded responsibility. In the successor states to the Third Reich-East Germany, West Germany, and Austria-prosecution varied widely. Communist East Germany pursued Nazi criminals and handed down severe sentences; West Germany, caught between facing up to the past and seeking to draw a line under it, tended toward selective justice and reintegration of former Nazis; and Austria made nearly no reckoning at all until the mid-1980s, when news broke about Austrian presidential candidate Kurt Waldheim's past. The continuing battle with the legacies of Nazism in the private sphere was often at odds with public remembrance and memorials.

Show more
Dresden: The Fire and the Darkness Audiobook

Dresden: The Fire and the Darkness

Author: Sinclair Mckay Narrator: Leighton Pugh Release Date: February 2020

Brought to by Penguin. In February 1945 the Allies obliterated Dresden, the 'Florence of the Elbe'. Explosive bombs weighing over 1,000 lbs fell every seven and a half seconds and an estimated 25,000 people were killed. Was Dresden a legitimate military target or was the bombing a last act of atavistic mass murder in a war already won? From the history of the city to the attack itself, conveyed in a minute-by-minute account from the first of the flares to the flames reaching almost a mile high - the wind so searingly hot that the lungs of those in its path were instantly scorched - through the eerie period of reconstruction, bestselling author Sinclair McKay creates a vast canvas and brings it alive with touching human detail. Along the way we encounter, for example, a Jewish woman who thought the English bombs had been sent from heaven, novelist Kurt Vonnegut who wrote that the smouldering landscape was like walking on the surface of the moon, and 15-year-old Winfried Bielss, who, having spent the evening ushering refugees, wanted to get home to his stamp collection. He was not to know that there was not enough time. Impeccably researched and deeply moving, McKay uses never-before-seen sources to relate the untold stories of civilians and vividly conveys the texture of life in a decimated city. Dresden is invoked as a byword for the illimitable cruelties of war, but with the ever-lengthening distance of time, it is now possible to approach this subject with a much clearer gaze, less occluded with the weight of prejudice in either direction, and with a keener interest in the sorts of lives that ordinary people lived and lost, or tried to rebuild. From general and individual morality in war to the raw, primal instinct for survival, through the seemingly unstoppable gravity of mass destruction and the manipulation of memory, this is a master historian at work. 'Extraordinary . . . a remarkably faithful account' Guardian on The Secret Life of Bletchley Park 'Painstakingly researched and fascinating' John Harding, Daily Mail on The Secret Listeners 'Lucid, well-researched and rich in detail' John Preston, Daily Mail on The Spies of Winter 'Fascinating, riveting, unsettling, and wonderfully rich in period detail' Craig Brown, Mail on Sunday on Mile End Murder © Sinclair McKay 2020 (P) Penguin Audio 2020

Show more
1000 Years of Annoying the French Audiobook

1000 Years of Annoying the French

Author: Stephen Clarke Narrator: Justin Edwards Release Date: February 2020

Brought to you by Penguin. Was the Battle of Hastings a French victory? Non! William the Conqueror was Norman and hated the French. Were the Brits really responsible for the death of Joan of Arc? Non! The French sentenced her to death for wearing trousers. Was the guillotine a French invention? Non! It was invented in Yorkshire. Ten centuries' worth of French historical 'facts' bite the dust as Stephen Clarke looks at what has really been going on since 1066 ... © Stephen Clarke 2010 (P) Penguin Audio 2020

Show more
First to Fight: The Polish War 1939 Audiobook

First to Fight: The Polish War 1939

Author: Roger Moorhouse Narrator: Roger Moorhouse Release Date: February 2020

Brought to you by Penguin. 'This deeply researched, very well-written and penetrating book will be the standard work on the subject for many years to come' - Andrew Roberts, author of Churchill: Walking with Destiny The Second World War began on 1 September 1939, when German tanks, trucks and infantry crossed the Polish border, and the Luftwaffe began bombing Poland's cities. The Polish army fought bravely but could not withstand an attacker superior in numbers and technology; and when the Red Army invaded from the east - as agreed in the pact Hitler had concluded with Stalin - the country's fate was sealed. Poland was the first to fight the German aggressor; it would be the first to suffer the full murderous force of Nazi persecution. By the end of the Second World War, one in five of its people had perished. The Polish campaign is the forgotten story of the Second World War. Despite prefacing many of that conflict's later horrors - the wanton targeting of civilians, indiscriminate bombing and ethnic cleansing - it is little understood, and most of what we think we know about it is Nazi propaganda, such as the myth of Polish cavalry charging German tanks with their lances. In truth, Polish forces put up a spirited defence, in the expectation that they would be assisted by their British and French allies. That assistance never came. First to Fight is the first history of the Polish war for almost half a century. Drawing on letters, memoirs and diaries by generals and politicians, soldiers and civilians from all sides, Roger Moorhouse's dramatic account of the military events is entwined with a tragic human story of courage and suffering, and a dark tale of diplomatic betrayal. © Roger Moorhouse 2019 (P) Penguin Audio 2020

Show more