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Europe Audiobooks in Travel

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LoveReading Top 10

  1. Hello, Summer Audiobook Hello, Summer
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  2. The Court of Miracles Audiobook The Court of Miracles
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  3. The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes (A Hunger Games Novel) Audiobook The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes (A Hunger Games Novel)
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  4. Whiskey Beach Audiobook Whiskey Beach
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  5. The Room Where It Happened: A White House Memoir Audiobook The Room Where It Happened: A White House Memoir
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  6. Find the Good: Unexpected Life Lessons From a Small-Town Obituary Writer Audiobook Find the Good: Unexpected Life Lessons From a Small-Town Obituary Writer
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  7. Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You: A Remix of the National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Be Audiobook Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You: A Remix of the National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Be
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  8. Between the World and Me Audiobook Between the World and Me
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  9. The Beekeeper of Aleppo: A moving testament to the human spirit Audiobook The Beekeeper of Aleppo: A moving testament to the human spirit
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  10. Cross My Heart Audiobook Cross My Heart
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Over a Hot Stove: A Kitchen Maid's Story Audiobook

Over a Hot Stove: A Kitchen Maid's Story

Author: Flo Wadlow Narrator: Christine Rendel Release Date: June 2020

This delightful memoir provides a unique 'Upstairs, Downstairs' account of what life was really like in a bygone era At the age of sixteen, Flo Wadlow left her family to begin what would become a distinguished life 'in service.' Starting as a kitchen maid in London, she soon rose through the ranks and worked at many of England's great houses, including Woodhall in Hilgay, where she met scullery maid Mollie Moran, author of Aprons and Silver Spoons; and Hatfield House and Blicking Hall. By her early twenties, Flo was in charge of the kitchen and cooked for prime ministers and royalty. Over a Hot Stove is a must-listen for fans of Downton Abbey.

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Twelve Who Ruled: The Year of the Terror in the French Revolution Audiobook

Twelve Who Ruled: The Year of the Terror in the French Revolution

Author: R.R. Palmer Narrator: David Stifel Release Date: June 2020

The Reign of Terror continues to fascinate scholars as one of the bloodiest periods in French history, when the Committee of Public Safety strove to defend the first Republic from its many enemies, creating a climate of fear and suspicion in revolutionary France. R. R. Palmer's fascinating narrative follows the Committee's deputies individually and collectively, recounting and assessing their tumultuous struggles in Paris and their repressive missions in the provinces. A foreword by Isser Woloch explains why this book remains an enduring classic in French revolutionary studies.

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The Coming of the Terror in the French Revolution Audiobook

The Coming of the Terror in the French Revolution

Author: Timothy Tackett Narrator: Michael Page Release Date: June 2020

Between 1793 and 1794, thousands of French citizens were imprisoned and hundreds sent to the guillotine by a powerful dictatorship that claimed to be acting in the public interest. Only a few years earlier, revolutionaries had proclaimed a new era of tolerance, equal justice, and human rights. How and why did the French Revolution's lofty ideals of liberty, equality, and fraternity descend into violence and terror?

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Orphans of Empire: The Fate of London's Foundlings Audiobook

Orphans of Empire: The Fate of London's Foundlings

Author: Helen Berry Narrator: Jennifer M. Dixon Release Date: June 2020

Eighteenth-century London was teeming with humanity, and poverty was never far from politeness. Legend has it that, on his daily commute through this thronging metropolis, Captain Thomas Coram witnessed one of the city's most shocking sights-the widespread abandonment of infant corpses by the roadside. Orphans of Empire tells the story of what happened to the thousands of children who were raised at the London Foundling Hospital, Coram's brainchild, which opened in 1741 and grew to become the most famous charity in Georgian England. It provides vivid insights into the lives and fortunes of London's poorest children, from the earliest days of the Foundling Hospital to the mid-Victorian era, when Charles Dickens was moved by his observations of the charity's work to campaign on behalf of orphans. Through the lives of London's foundlings, this book provides readers with a street-level insight into the wider global history of a period of monumental change in British history as the nation grew into the world's leading superpower. Through extensive archival research, Helen Berry uncovers previously untold stories of what happened to former foundlings, including the suffering and small triumphs they experienced as child workers during the upheavals of the Industrial Revolution.

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The Moment of Liberation in Western Europe: Power Struggles and Rebellions, 1943-1948 Audiobook

The Moment of Liberation in Western Europe: Power Struggles and Rebellions, 1943-1948

Author: Gerd-Rainer Horn Narrator: Michael Page Release Date: June 2020

The Moment of Liberation in Western Europe: Power Struggles & Rebellions, 1943-1948, regards the final two years of World War II and the immediate post-liberation period as a moment in twentieth century history when the shape and contours of postwar Western Europe appeared highly uncertain and various alternatives and conflicting visions were up for grabs. After close to six years of total war, Nazi terror, and brutal occupation policies, a growing number of Europeans were no longer content solely to fight for national liberation from fascist control. Having staked their lives in military and civilian resistance to Nazism and Italian fascism across the continent, surviving activists were aiming to ensure that such a political and social catastrophe would never befall Europe again. In the closing moments of World War II, there were extensive popular social movements at work in almost every single state which aimed to construct postwar societies in which grassroots democracy and the free association of rank-and-file activists would replace the profit principle and the top-down Jacobin orientation by traditional elites. This study for the first time reconstructs the parameters of this contest over the shape of postwar Western Europe from a consistently transnational perspective.

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The Enemy at the Gate: Habsburgs, Ottomans, and the Battle for Europe Audiobook

The Enemy at the Gate: Habsburgs, Ottomans, and the Battle for Europe

Author: Andrew Wheatcroft Narrator: Andrew Wheatcroft Release Date: June 2020

An acclaimed history of the Great Siege of Vienna, when the Ottoman Empire and the Habsburg dynasty came face to face In 1683, an Ottoman army that stretched from horizon to horizon set out to seize Vienna, the bulwark of Christendom. The ensuing siege pitted battle-hardened Janissaries wielding seventeenth-century grenades against Habsburg armies widely feared for their savagery. The walls of Vienna bristled with guns as the besieging Ottoman host launched bombs, fired cannons, and showered the populace with arrows. Each side was sustained by the hatred of its age-old enemy, certain that victory would be won by the grace of God.The Great Siege of Vienna is the centerpiece of historian Andrew Wheatcroft's richly drawn portrait of the complex centuries-long rivalry between the Ottoman and Habsburg empires for control of the European continent. A gripping work by a master historian, The Enemy at the Gate offers a timely examination of an epic clash of civilizations.

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The Great Cat Massacre: And Other Episodes in French Cultural History Audiobook

The Great Cat Massacre: And Other Episodes in French Cultural History

Author: Robert Darnton Narrator: Ken Kliban Release Date: June 2020

The landmark history of France and French culture in the eighteenth-century, a winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize When the apprentices of a Paris printing shop in the 1730s held a series of mock trials and then hanged all the cats they could lay their hands on, why did they find it so hilariously funny that they choked with laughter when they reenacted it in pantomime some twenty times? Why in the eighteenth-century version of Little Red Riding Hood did the wolf eat the child at the end? What did the anonymous townsman of Montpelier have in mind when he kept an exhaustive dossier on all the activities of his native city? These are some of the provocative questions the distinguished Harvard historian Robert Darnton answers The Great Cat Massacre, a kaleidoscopic view of European culture during in what we like to call 'The Age of Enlightenment.' A classic of European history, it is an essential starting point for understanding Enlightenment France.

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Providence Lost: The Rise and Fall of Cromwell's Protectorate Audiobook

Providence Lost: The Rise and Fall of Cromwell's Protectorate

Author: Paul Lay Narrator: Gordon Griffin Release Date: June 2020

'A compelling and wry narrative of one of the most intellectually thrilling eras of British history' The Guardian England, 1651. Oliver Cromwell has defeated his royalist opponents in two civil wars, executed the Stuart king Charles I, laid waste to Ireland, and crushed the late king's son and his Scottish allies. He is master of Britain and Ireland. But Parliament, divided between moderates, republicans and Puritans of uncompromisingly millenarian hue, is faction-ridden and disputatious. By the end of 1653, Cromwell has become 'Lord Protector'. Seeking dragons for an elect Protestant nation to slay, he launches an ambitious 'Western Design' against Spain's empire in the New World. When an amphibious assault on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola in 1655 proves a disaster, a shaken Cromwell is convinced that God is punishing England for its sinfulness. But the imposition of the rule of the Major-Generals - bureaucrats with a penchant for closing alehouses - backfires spectacularly. Sectarianism and fundamentalism run riot. Radicals and royalists join together in conspiracy. The only way out seems to be a return to a Parliament presided over by a king. But will Cromwell accept the crown? Paul Lay narrates in entertaining but always rigorous fashion the story of England's first and only experiment with republican government: he brings the febrile world of Oliver Cromwell's Protectorate to life, providing vivid portraits of the extraordinary individuals who inhabited it and capturing its dissonant cacophony of political and religious voices.

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I Belong to Vienna: A Jewish Family's Story of Exile and Return Audiobook

I Belong to Vienna: A Jewish Family's Story of Exile and Return

Author: Anna Goldenberg Narrator: Christa Lewis Release Date: June 2020

In autumn 1942, Anna Goldenberg's great-grandparents and one of their sons are deported to the Theresienstadt concentration camp. Hans, their elder son, survives by hiding in an apartment in the middle of Nazi-controlled Vienna. But this is no Anne Frank-like existence; teenage Hans passes time in the municipal library and buys standing-room tickets to the Vienna State Opera. Hans never sees his family again. Goldenberg reconstructs this unique story in magnificent reportage. She also portrays Vienna's undying allure-although they tried living in the United States after World War Two, both grandparents eventually returned to the Austrian capital. The author, too, has returned to her native Vienna after studying and working in New York, and her fierce attachment to her birthplace enlivens her engrossing biographical history. This probing tale of heroism, identity, and belonging is marked by a surprising freshness as a new generation comes to terms with history's darkest era.

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La huida de las ratas Audiobook

La huida de las ratas

Author: Eric Frattini Narrator: Arturo Lopez Release Date: June 2020

-Este audiolibro está narrado en castellano. El gobierno de Franco y el Vaticano ayudaron a escapar de Europa y de ser juzgados en Núremberg a importantes nazis acusados de genocidio y de crímenes contra la humanidad. Adolf Eichmann, el «arquitecto» del Holocausto, Josef Mengele, el «Ángel de la muerte» de Auschwitz, Franz Stangl, el verdugo de Treblinka, Klaus Barbie, el carnicero de Lyon, John Ivan Demjanjuk, Erich Priebke, Gustav Wagner, Hermine Braunsteiner, Otto Wächter, Walter Rauff, Herberts Cukurs y Erich Rajakowitsch son las «ratas» que escaparon de Europa dejando tras de sí una gran marca de sangre y horror.

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Atomic Spy: The Dark Lives of Klaus Fuchs Audiobook

Atomic Spy: The Dark Lives of Klaus Fuchs

Author: Nancy Thorndike Greenspan Narrator: Tavia Gilbert Release Date: May 2020

'Nancy Greenspan dives into the mysteries of the Klaus Fuchs espionage case and emerges with a classic Cold War biography of intrigue and torn loyalties. Atomic Spy is a mesmerizing morality tale, told with fresh sources and empathy.' --Kai Bird, author of The Good Spy and coauthor of American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer The gripping biography of a notorious Cold War villain--the German-born British scientist who handed the Soviets top-secret American plans for the plutonium bomb--showing a man torn between conventional loyalties and a sense of obligation to a greater good. German by birth, British by naturalization, Communist by conviction, Klaus Fuchs was a fearless Nazi resister, a brilliant scientist, and an infamous spy. He was convicted of espionage by Britain in 1950 for handing over the designs of the plutonium bomb to the Russians, and has gone down in history as one of the most dangerous agents in American and British history. He put an end to America's nuclear hegemony and single-handedly heated up the Cold War. But, was Klaus Fuchs really evil? Using archives long hidden in Germany as well as intimate family correspondence, Nancy Thorndike Greenspan brings into sharp focus the moral and political ambiguity of the times in which Fuchs lived and the ideals with which he struggled. As a university student in Germany, he stood up to Nazi terror without flinching, and joined the Communists largely because they were the only ones resisting the Nazis. After escaping to Britain in 1933, he was arrested as a German émigré--an 'enemy alien'--in 1940 and sent to an internment camp in Canada. His mentor at university, renowned physicist Max Born, worked to facilitate his release. After years of struggle and ideological conflict, when Fuchs joined the atomic bomb project, his loyalties were firmly split. He started handing over top secret research to the Soviets in 1941, and continued for years from deep within the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos. Greenspan's insights into his motivations make us realize how he was driven not just by his Communist convictions but seemingly by a dedication to peace, seeking to level the playing field of the world powers. With thrilling detail from never-before-seen sources, Atomic Spy travels across the Germany of an ascendant Nazi party; the British university classroom of Max Born; a British internment camp in Canada; the secret laboratories of Los Alamos; and Eastern Germany at the height of the Cold War. Atomic Spy shows the real Klaus Fuchs--who he was, what he did, why he did it, and how he was caught. His extraordinary life is a cautionary tale about the ambiguity of morality and loyalty, as pertinent today as in the 1940s.

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Goering: The Rise and Fall of the Notorious Nazi Leader Audiobook

Goering: The Rise and Fall of the Notorious Nazi Leader

Author: Heinrich Fraenkel, Roger Manvell Narrator: Joe Barrett Release Date: May 2020

A penetrating biography of one of the most infamous members of the Nazi high command. In Goering, Roger Manvell and Heinrich Fraenkel use firsthand testimonies and a variety of historical documents to tell the story of a monster lurking in Hitler's shadows. After rising through the ranks of the German army, Hermann Goering became Hitler's right hand man and was hand-picked to head the Luftwaffe, one of history's most feared fighting forces. As he rose in power, though, Goering became disillusioned and was eventually shunned from Hitler's inner circle. Alone at the end, he faced justice at the Nuremberg trials and was convicted of war crimes and crime against humanity. He committed suicide in prison before he could be hanged. In this book, Manvell and Fraenkel bring to life one of history's most complicated and hated characters.

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