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Europe Audiobooks in Travel

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LoveReading Top 10

  1. Troy: Our Greatest Story Retold Audiobook Troy: Our Greatest Story Retold
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  2. A Christmas to Remember: The enchanting new novel from Sunday Times bestselling author Anton Du Beke Audiobook A Christmas to Remember: The enchanting new novel from Sunday Times bestselling author Anton Du Beke
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  3. A Del of a Life: The hilarious new memoir from the national treasure Audiobook A Del of a Life: The hilarious new memoir from the national treasure
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  4. Hungry: The Highly Anticipated Memoir from One of the Greatest Food Writers of All Time Audiobook Hungry: The Highly Anticipated Memoir from One of the Greatest Food Writers of All Time
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  5. I Wish It Could Be Christmas Every Day Audiobook I Wish It Could Be Christmas Every Day
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  6. Ghosts Audiobook Ghosts
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  7. Rag-and-Bone Christmas Audiobook Rag-and-Bone Christmas
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  8. 19th Christmas: (Women's Murder Club 19) Audiobook 19th Christmas: (Women's Murder Club 19)
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  9. Why Mummy’s Sloshed: The Bigger the Kids, the Bigger the Drink Audiobook Why Mummy’s Sloshed: The Bigger the Kids, the Bigger the Drink
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  10. Tomorrow Will Be A Good Day: My Autobiography Audiobook Tomorrow Will Be A Good Day: My Autobiography
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War of the Sicilian Vespers, The: The History and Legacy of Sicily’s Rebellion against the French in Audiobook

War of the Sicilian Vespers, The: The History and Legacy of Sicily’s Rebellion against the French in

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Colin Fluxman Release Date: September 2020

However diverse Sicily might be, it is also paradoxically considered to be an emblem of Italy itself, a paradox it shares with Naples. In fact, Frederick II was the last ruler of a fully autonomous Sicily, and his son, Manfred (r. 1254-1258), was the final Norman ruler in Sicily. Manfred met his death heroically on the battlefield, fighting the army of Charles of Anjou after Charles was made King of Rome by the Vatican in 1266. Charles chose Naples as the capital of his lands, and this created tensions between his people and the Sicilians, culminating with a rebellion known as the Sicilian Vespers of 1282. According to legend, the rebellion started after a French soldier harassed a Sicilian woman on Easter Sunday outside the Church of Santo Spirito. When it came about, the rebellion inaugurated a period of anarchy in Sicily, and for a time was unclear who would take the crown. Two warring factions, the Aragonese and the Angevins, competed for the crown for 90 years, to the detriment of all involved. At one point, there were two different kings of Sicily, one from each side, and it was not until 1372 that peace was finally reached and the Aragonese were awarded rule of Sicily. As a result of all this geopolitical turmoil, Sicily’s status in the world was greatly diminished. Spain was on the rise, and even if Palermo received certain bureaucratic dispensations, nothing would shift the center of power back into Sicily’s orbit. In the wake of the infighting, Sicily was affected by other major geopolitical events elsewhere. When Constantinople fell in 1453, the ascent of the Ottoman Turks meant that Sicily was constantly being threatened. Pirates and corsairs from North Africa continued to besiege the coastal towns, and the island became an important staging ground for those trying to counter the Muslims.

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Varangian Guard, The: The History and Legacy of the Byzantine Empire’s Elite Mercenary Unit Audiobook

Varangian Guard, The: The History and Legacy of the Byzantine Empire’s Elite Mercenary Unit

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Colin Fluxman Release Date: September 2020

The Byzantine Empire was the heir to two great cultures that cradled and nurtured European civilization: Greece and Rome. Constantinople, now called Istanbul, became a center of power, culture, trade, and technology poised on the edges of Europe and Asia, and its influence was felt not only throughout Europe but the Middle East, Africa, Central Asia, and the Far East. Coins dating from the reign of Emperor Justinian I (r.527-565) have been found in southern India, and Chinese records show that the “Fulin,” as the Chinese named the Byzantines, were received at court as early as 643 CE. For a thousand years, the Byzantine Empire protected Europe from the Islamic Arab Empire, allowing it to pursue its own destiny. Finally, Byzantium was a polyglot society in which a multitude of ethnic groups lived under the emperor prizing peace above war, an inspiration surely for the modern age when divisive nationalism threatens to dominate society once more.  The Byzantines relied heavily on mercenaries, and the Hetairoi or foreign soldiers formed an important and often vital component of the army. The ability to call upon warriors from many nations demonstrated the power and wealth of the emperor, so they were recruited as much for prestige as for military utility. The most famous of the foreign units was without question the Varangian Guard. The Varangians came from the land in Eastern Europe known in the Middle Ages as Rus, which is now part of modern Russia and Ukraine. They were descendants of Viking warriors from Sweden who came to rule the waterways and population of Russia. Varangian mercenaries were fighting for the Byzantines by the 10th century, and in 988 they formed a permanent elite guard for the emperor. They took an oath of allegiance to him and served directly under the Acolyte or Akolouthos, who was usually of Byzantine origin. They also assumed responsibilities for the security of Constantinople.

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Undercover War: Britain's Special Forces and their secret battle against the IRA Audiobook

Undercover War: Britain's Special Forces and their secret battle against the IRA

Author: Harry Mccallion Narrator: Colin Mace Release Date: August 2020

When British troops first deployed to Northern Ireland in 1969 to keep apart rioting factions of loyalists and nationalists, they could not have known that they were being drawn into the longest campaign in the British Army's history, a battle against the threat of a new rising force - the Provisional Irish Republican Army. While patrols, vehicle bombs and incendiary speeches are the defining memories of the Troubles, the real war was fought out of sight and out of mind. For thirty years, Britain's Special Forces waged a ferocious, secretive struggle against a ruthless and implacable enemy. Harry McCallion's deep experience across the theatre of Northern Ireland offers a unique insight into nearly every major military action and operation in the Province. Having served seven tours with the Parachute Regiment, undergone selection for 14 Intelligence Company, completed six years with the SAS - including two tours with their anti-terrorism team - and received two commendations for bravery during service with the Royal Ulster Constabulary, there are few more qualified to tell this astonishing story. This book is his blistering account of the history of Britain's war against the IRA between 1970 and 1998. From new insights into high-profile killings and riveting accounts of enemy contact, to revelations about clandestine missions and the strategies used in combating a merciless enemy, Undercover War is the definitive inside story of the battle against the IRA, one of the most dangerous and effective terrorist organisations in recent history.

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The Secrets of Saffron Hall Audiobook

The Secrets of Saffron Hall

Author: Clare Marchant Narrator: Hattie Ladbury Release Date: August 2020

Two women. Five centuries apart. One life-changing secret about to be unearthed… 1538 New bride Eleanor impresses her husband by growing saffron, a spice more valuable than gold. His reputation in Henry VIII’s court soars – but fame and fortune come at a price, for the king’s favour will not last forever… 2019 When Amber discovers an ancient book in her grandfather’s home at Saffron Hall, the contents reveal a dark secret from the past. As she investigates, so unravels a forgotten tragic story and a truth that lies much closer to home than she could have imagined… An enchanting historical novel about love and hope in dangerous times, perfect for fans of Lucinda Riley and Kathryn Hughes. ‘Emotional and intense, this is a page-turning story of secrets that echo through time’ Rachel Hore, author of The Love Child ‘A rich and vivid historical story, this is one of those rare books that is totally engrossing. I loved it’ Nicola Cornick, author of The Forgotten Sister ‘The past and present is skilfully entwined in this captivating and emotional debut’ Heidi Swain, author of The Secret Seaside Escape ‘Emotive, immersive and compelling, a beautiful story that captures the heart’ Liz Fenwick, author of The Path to the Sea ‘This pulled me in and didn’t let me go: a page-turner with such historical depth and tender touch that it enchanted my heart. I adored it.’ Laura Jane Williams, author of Our Stop ‘Intriguing and fascinating, a real insight into a turbulent time in England’s history’ Kathleen McGurl, author of The Secret of the Chateau ‘An intensely gripping, emotional read, that kept me turning the pages until the early hours of the morning. An atmospheric story sure to please all fans of timeslip novels!’ Christina Courtenay, author of Echoes of the Runes ‘A beautifully written story which pulls you in and whisks you away to another time.’ Rosie Hendry, author of the East End Angels series

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Chasing Chopin: A Musical Journey Across Three Centuries, Four Countries, and a Half-Dozen Revolutio Audiobook

Chasing Chopin: A Musical Journey Across Three Centuries, Four Countries, and a Half-Dozen Revolutio

Author: Annik Lafarge Narrator: Nancy Peterson Release Date: August 2020

A modern take on a classical icon: this original, entertaining, well-researched book uses the story of when, where, and how Chopin composed his most famous work, uncovering many surprises along the way and showing how his innovative music still animates popular culture centuries later. The Frédéric Chopin Annik LaFarge presents here is not the melancholy, sickly, romantic figure so often portrayed. The artist she discovered is, instead, a purely independent spirit: an innovator who created a new musical language, an autodidact who became a spiritually generous, trailblazing teacher, a stalwart patriot during a time of revolution and exile. In Chasing Chopin she follows in his footsteps during the three years, 1837–1840, when he composed his iconic "Funeral March"—dum dum da dum—using its composition story to illuminate the key themes of his life: a deep attachment to his Polish homeland; his complex relationship with writer George Sand; their harrowing but consequential sojourn on Majorca; the rapidly developing technology of the piano, which enabled his unique tone and voice; social and political revolution in 1830s Paris; friendship with other artists, from the famous Eugène Delacroix to the lesser known, yet notorious in his time, Marquis de Custine. Each of these threads—musical, political, social, personal—is woven through the "Funeral March" in Chopin's Opus 35 sonata, a melody so famous it's known around the world even to people who know nothing about classical music. But it is not, as LaFarge discovered, the piece of music we think we know. As part of her research into Chopin's world, then and now, LaFarge visited piano makers, monuments, churches, and archives; she talked to scholars, jazz musicians, video game makers, software developers, music teachers, theater directors, and of course dozens of pianists. The result is extraordinary: an engrossing, page-turning work of musical discovery and an artful portrayal of a man whose work and life continue to inspire artists and cultural innovators in astonishing ways. A companion website, WhyChopin, presents links to each piece of music mentioned in the book, organized by chapter in the order in which it appears, along with photos, resources, videos, and more.

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The Nazi Menace: Hitler, Churchill, Roosevelt, Stalin, and the Road to War Audiobook

The Nazi Menace: Hitler, Churchill, Roosevelt, Stalin, and the Road to War

Author: Benjamin Carter Hett Narrator: Raphael Corkhill Release Date: August 2020

A panoramic narrative of the years leading up to the Second World War—a tale of democratic crisis, racial conflict, and a belated recognition of evil, with profound resonance for our own time. Berlin, November 1937. Adolf Hitler meets with his military commanders to impress upon them the urgent necessity for a war of aggression in eastern Europe. Some generals are unnerved by the Führer’s grandiose plan, but these dissenters are silenced one by one, setting in motion events that will culminate in the most calamitous war in history. Benjamin Carter Hett takes us behind the scenes in Berlin, London, Moscow, and Washington, revealing the unsettled politics within each country in the wake of the German dictator’s growing provocations. He reveals the fitful path by which anti-Nazi forces inside and outside Germany came to understand Hitler’s true menace to European civilization and learned to oppose him, painting a sweeping portrait of governments under siege, as larger-than-life figures struggled to turn events to their advantage. As in The Death of Democracy, his acclaimed history of the fall of the Weimar Republic, Hett draws on original sources and newly released documents to show how these long-ago conflicts have unexpected resonances in our own time. To read The Nazi Menace is to see past and present in a new and unnerving light. A Macmillan Audio production from Henry Holt and Company

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The Feud That Sparked the Renaissance: How Brunelleschi and Ghiberti Changed the Art World Audiobook

The Feud That Sparked the Renaissance: How Brunelleschi and Ghiberti Changed the Art World

Author: Paul Robert Walker Narrator: Simon Vance Release Date: August 2020

Joining the bestsellers Longitude and Galileo’s Daughter, a lively and intriguing tale of two artists whose competitive spirit brought to life one of the world’s most magnificent structures and ignited the Renaissance The dome of the Santa Maria del Fiore, the great cathedral of Florence, is among the most enduring symbols of the Renaissance, an equal to the works of Leonardo and Michelangelo. Its designer was Filippo Brunelleschi, a temperamental architect and inventor who rediscovered the techniques of mathematical perspective. Yet the completion of the dome was not Brunelleschi’s glory alone. He was forced to share the commission with his archrival, the canny and gifted sculptor Lorenzo Ghiberti. In this lush, imaginative history—a fascinating true story of artistic genius and personal triumph—Paul Robert Walker breathes life into these two talented, passionate artists and the competitive drive that united and dived them. As it illuminates fascinating individuals from Donatello and Masaccio to Cosimo de’Medici and Leon Battista Alberti, The Feud That Sparked the Renaissance offers a glorious tour of 15th-century Florence, a bustling city on the verge of greatness in a time of flourishing creativity, rivalry, and genius.

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World of Our Fathers: The Journey of the East European Jews to America and the Life They Found and M Audiobook

World of Our Fathers: The Journey of the East European Jews to America and the Life They Found and M

Author: Irving Howe Narrator: David Colacci Release Date: August 2020

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, two million Jewish immigrants poured into America, leaving places like Warsaw or the Russian shtetls to pass through Ellis Island and start over in the New World. This is a 'brilliant' account of their stories (the New York Times). Though some moved on to Philadelphia, Chicago, and other points west, many of these new citizens settled in New York City, especially in Manhattan's teeming tenements. Like others before and after, they struggled to hold on to the culture and community they brought from their homelands, all the while striving to escape oppression and find opportunity. They faced poverty and crime, but also experienced the excitement of freedom and previously unimaginable possibilities. Over the course of decades, from the 1880s to the 1920s, they were assimilated into the great melting pot as the Yiddish language slowly gave way to English; work was found in sweatshops; children were sent to both religious and secular schools; and, for the lucky ones, the American dream was attained-if not in the first generation, then by the second or third. Nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award, World of Our Fathers explores the many aspects of this time and place in history, from the political to the cultural.

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Condottieri, The: The History of Italy’s Elite Mercenaries during the Middle Ages and Renaissance Audiobook

Condottieri, The: The History of Italy’s Elite Mercenaries during the Middle Ages and Renaissance

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Stephen Platt Release Date: August 2020

Since several large city-states such as Milan and Venice growing rich on the prosperous Mediterranean trade routes, they had the money to commission grandiose cathedrals and works of art that still astound people today, but they also had the resources to hire armies and constantly fight to expand their power. Ironically, their very success was an impediment, as most prosperous city-states had far more money than available manpower because so many people worked in essential jobs in agriculture, crafts, or public works. Large bodies of men could not be spared for fighting, so if a city-state wanted to expand, it needed to hire an army to bolster the ranks. Other factors limited the use of homegrown armies. City militias often got embroiled in the factional disputes that were rife in Italian urban politics, to the extent that the militia might take one side or another, or be so divided as to be ineffective against external enemies. The only way to avoid this was to bring in neutral, outside administrators all factions could agree on to handle local affairs in a supposedly impartial manner. Known as the podestà system, this odd method of running a government began to be common by the late 13th century, but this administration would need troops of its own and naturally hired outsiders, often non-Italians, to keep the peace. Thus was born the condottieri (singular condottiero or condottiere). Meaning “contractor,” it referred not only to the captains of mercenary bands but was also used as a general term for all the mercenaries in Italy during the Late Middle Ages and Renaissance. These flamboyant figures, sometimes of noble birth, had at their command experienced armies who hired themselves out to the highest bidder and kept to a strict code of professional ethics. Their fighting prowess and prestige soon put them in high demand, and rulers all across Italy eagerly bid for their services.

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Is Paris Burning? Audiobook

Is Paris Burning?

Author: Dominique Lapierre, Larry Collins Narrator: Grover Gardner Release Date: August 2020

“Is Paris burning?” is the question Hitler asked over and over as the French Second and American Fourth Divisions battered their way into the city. Few moments in history are as stirring as the Allied liberation of Paris, yet few people are aware of how narrowly—and how miraculously—the city escaped Hitler’s secret plan to reduce it to ashes. Is Paris Burning? reconstructs, in meticulous and riveting detail, the network of fateful events—day by day, moment by moment—that saved the City of Light. Bestselling authors and renowned journalists Larry Collins and Dominique Lapierre spent three years researching this book, drawing on French Resistance radio messages, German military records, countless interviews, and secret correspondence between de Gaulle, Churchill, Roosevelt, and Eisenhower. Here they recreate the drama, the fervor, and the triumph that heralded one of the most dramatic events of our time.

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Children of Ash and Elm: A History of the Vikings Audiobook

Children of Ash and Elm: A History of the Vikings

Author: Neil Price Narrator: Samuel Roukin Release Date: August 2020

The definitive history of the Vikings-from arts and culture to politics and cosmology-by a distinguished archaeologist with decades of expertise The Viking Age-from 750 to 1050-saw an unprecedented expansion of the Scandinavian peoples into the wider world. As traders and raiders, explorers and colonists, they ranged from eastern North America to the Asian steppe. But for centuries, the Vikings have been seen through the eyes of others, distorted to suit the tastes of medieval clerics and Elizabethan playwrights, Victorian imperialists, Nazis, and more. None of these appropriations capture the real Vikings, or the richness and sophistication of their culture. Based on the latest archaeological and textual evidence, Children of Ash and Elm tells the story of the Vikings on their own terms: their politics, their cosmology and religion, their material world. Known today for a stereotype of maritime violence, the Vikings exported new ideas, technologies, beliefs, and practices to the lands they discovered and the peoples they encountered, and in the process were themselves changed. From Eirík Bloodaxe, who fought his way to a kingdom, to Gudrid Thorbjarnardóttir, the most traveled woman in the world, Children of Ash and Elm is the definitive history of the Vikings and their time.

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The Hitler Years ~ Triumph 1933-1939 Audiobook

The Hitler Years ~ Triumph 1933-1939

Author: Frank Mcdonough Narrator: Paul Mcgann Release Date: August 2020

'A masterclass in the history of Nazi Germany, with an internationally renowned expert as the teacher' GET HISTORY. On 30 January 1933, Adolf Hitler was appointed the German Chancellor of a coalition government by President Hindenburg. Within a few months he had installed a dictatorship, jailing and killing his leftwing opponents, terrorising the rest of the population and driving Jews out of public life. He embarked on a crash programme on militaristic Keynesianism, reviving the economy and achieving full employment through massive public works, vast armaments spending and the cancellations of foreign debts. After the grim years of the Great Depression, Germany seemed to have been reborn as a brutal and determined European power. Over the course of the years from 1933 to 1939, Hitler won over most of the population to his vision of a renewed Reich. In these years of domestic triumph, cunning manoeuvres, pitting neighbouring powers against each other and biding his time, we see Hitler preparing for the moment that would realise his ambition. But what drove Hitler's success was also to be the fatal flaw of his regime: a relentless belief in war as the motor of greatness, a dream of vast conquests in Eastern Europe and an astonishingly fanatical racism. In The Hitler Years, Frank McDonough charts the rise and fall of the Third Reich under Hitler's hand. The first volume, Triumph, ends after Germany's comprehensive military defeat of Poland in 1939. 2020 Head of Zeus

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