Europe Audiobooks in Travel

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  1. The Silence of Scheherazade Audiobook The Silence of Scheherazade
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  2. Think Big: Take Small Steps and Build the Future You Want Audiobook Think Big: Take Small Steps and Build the Future You Want
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  3. Appetite: A Memoir in Recipes of Family and Food Audiobook Appetite: A Memoir in Recipes of Family and Food
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  4. A Line to Kill: from the global bestselling author of Moonflower Murders Audiobook A Line to Kill: from the global bestselling author of Moonflower Murders
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  5. Such a Quiet Place Audiobook Such a Quiet Place
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  6. 1979 Audiobook 1979
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  7. The Reckoning: America's Trauma and Finding a Way to Heal Audiobook The Reckoning: America's Trauma and Finding a Way to Heal
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  8. Land of Big Numbers Audiobook Land of Big Numbers
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  9. Gene Keys: Embracing Your Higher Purpose Audiobook Gene Keys: Embracing Your Higher Purpose
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  10. What We Find Audiobook What We Find
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Anglo-Saxon England Before the Norman Conquest: The History and Legacy of the Anglo-Saxons during th Audiobook

Anglo-Saxon England Before the Norman Conquest: The History and Legacy of the Anglo-Saxons during th

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Colin Fluxman Release Date: November 2020

Shortly after Emperor Hadrian came to power in the early 2nd century CE, he decided to seal off Scotland from Roman Britain with an ambitious wall stretching from sea to sea. To accomplish this, the wall had to be built from the mouth of the River Tyne – where Newcastle stands today – 80 Roman miles (76 miles or 122 kilometers) west to Bowness-on-Solway. The sheer scale of Hadrian’s Wall still impresses people today, but as the Western Roman Empire collapsed in the late 5th century, Hadrian’s Wall was abandoned and Roman control of the area broke down. Little is known of this period of British history, but soon the Anglo-Saxons – who had been harassing the Saxon Shore as pirates – showed up and began to settle the land, creating a patchwork of little kingdoms and starting a new era of British history. Several early medieval historians, writing well after the events, said the Anglo-Saxons were invited to Britain to defend the region from the northern tribes and ended up taking over. The Venerable Bede (672 or 673-735) said in his Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum (“Ecclesiastical History of the English People”) that in the year 449, “The British consulted what was to be done and where they should seek assistance to prevent or repel the cruel and frequent incursions of the northern nations. They all agreed with their king Vortigern to call over to their aid, from the parts beyond the sea, the Saxon nation. … The two first commanders are said to have been Hengist and Horsa.” However they came to control most of England, the Anglo-Saxons became the dominant power in the region for nearly 500 years, and the strength of their cultural influence could be felt even after William the Conqueror won the Battle of Hastings and became the first Norman ruler on the island. 

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Anglo-Saxon Portraits: Thirty ground-breaking men and women of the early English nation Audiobook

Anglo-Saxon Portraits: Thirty ground-breaking men and women of the early English nation

Author: Various Narrator: Barbara Yorke, David Almond, Michael Wood, Rowan Williams, Seamus Heaney Release Date: November 2020

The half millennium between the creation of the English nation in around 550 and the Norman Conquest in 1066 was a formative one. This groundbreaking series rediscovers the Anglo-Saxons through vivid portraits of thirty incredible men and women, as told by their contemporary admirers. Nobel prize-winner Seamus Heaney discusses the Beowulf bard; former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams focuses on St Augustine, the first Archbishop of Canterbury; Michael Wood celebrates Penda, the much-maligned last pagan king of England; Barbara Yorke tells the story of Hild of Whitby, the powerful abbess and largely forgotten pre-feminism model; and writer David Almond investigates the oldest surviving English poet, Caedmon. From royalty to peasants, the women behind the Bayeux Tapestry to rebellious nuns, Anglo-Saxon Portraits unravels the mysteries of a too often forgotten period in British history.

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Anglo-Saxons: A Captivating Guide to the People Who Inhabited Great Britain from the Early Middle Ag Audiobook

Anglo-Saxons: A Captivating Guide to the People Who Inhabited Great Britain from the Early Middle Ag

Author: Captivating History Narrator: Randy Whitlow Release Date: June 2019

If you want to discover the captivating history of the Anglo-Saxons, then pay attention... There was a time before England was united. This was a time before William the Bastard decided to prove to his contemporaries that his bastard moniker would be erased with a swift conquest of the biggest island northwest of Europe. A time before the Battle of Hastings and the year 1066. A time when many petty kingdoms ruled, conquered, and were liberated, time and time again, by a specific people group. A people group that is, in fact, a blend of many and that authors of later dates would collectively call the Anglo-Saxons. The Anglo-Saxons were, indeed, an odd group of people to take control of Britain. But they didn't do it all at once, and just like any other people in history, they had a period of adjustment, growth, reconstruction, and eventual rise to prominence.  In Anglo-Saxons: A Captivating Guide to the People Who Inhabited Great Britain from the Early Middle Ages to the Norman Conquest of England, you will discover topics such as Anglo-Saxons ArriveEarly Anglo-Saxons: Origins and Pre-Settlement HistoryThe Culture of Anglo-Saxons: Religion, Customs, Social Hierarchy, Early ChristianityEveryday Life of Anglo-Saxon England: Jobs and Division of Labor, Food and Drink, Clothes, Architecture, Travel, Wars, Gender and Age Norms, Art, Written WorksAnglo-Saxon KingdomsAnglo-Saxon LegacyAnd much, much more!So if you want to learn more about the history of the Anglo-Saxons, scroll up and click the 'add to cart' button!

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Anne Boleyn, A King's Obsession Audiobook

Anne Boleyn, A King's Obsession

Author: Alison Weir Narrator: Rosalyn Landor Release Date: May 2017

A novel filled with fresh insights into the story of Henry VIII's second-and most infamous-wife, Anne Boleyn. The new book in the epic Six Tudor Queens series, from the acclaimed historian and bestselling author of Katherine of Aragon. It is the spring of 1527. Henry VIII has come to Hever Castle in Kent to pay court to Anne Boleyn. He is desperate to have her. For this mirror of female perfection he will set aside his Queen and all Cardinal Wolsey's plans for a dynastic French marriage. Anne Boleyn is not so sure. She loathes Wolsey for breaking her betrothal to the Earl of Northumberland's son, Harry Percy, whom she had loved. She does not welcome the King's advances; she knows that she can never give him her heart. But hers is an opportunist family. And whether Anne is willing or not, they will risk it all to see their daughter on the throne.

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Anne Boleyn: 500 Years of Lies Audiobook

Anne Boleyn: 500 Years of Lies

Author: Hayley Nolan Narrator: Hayley Nolan Release Date: December 2019

A bold new analysis of one of history’s most misrepresented women. History has lied. Anne Boleyn has been sold to us as a dark figure, a scheming seductress who bewitched Henry VIII into divorcing his queen and his church in an unprecedented display of passion. Quite the tragic love story, right? Wrong. In this electrifying exposé, Hayley Nolan explores for the first time the full, uncensored evidence of Anne Boleyn’s life and relationship with Henry VIII, revealing the shocking suppression of a powerful woman. So leave all notions of outdated and romanticised folklore at the door and forget what you think you know about one of the Tudors’ most notorious queens. She may have been silenced for centuries, but this urgent book ensures Anne Boleyn’s voice is being heard now. #TheTruthWillOut

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Apartheid in South Africa: The History and Legacy of the Notorious Segregationist Policies in the 20 Audiobook

Apartheid in South Africa: The History and Legacy of the Notorious Segregationist Policies in the 20

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Colin Fluxman Release Date: March 2019

"During my lifetime I have dedicated myself to this struggle of the African people. I have fought against white domination, and I have fought against black domination. I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons will live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal which I hope to live for. But, my lord, if needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die." - Nelson Mandela, 1964 On June 1, 1948, Daniel Malan arrived in Pretoria by train to take office, and there he was met by a huge crowd of cheering whites. He told the audience, "In the past, we felt like strangers in our own country, but today, South Africa belongs to us once more. For the first time since Union, South Africa is our own. May God grant that it always remain our own." Back in Johannesburg, the leadership of the ANC, including the young attorney Nelson Mandela, listened to these celebratory prognostications in a grim mood. As strangers in their own country, they all understood that the South African liberation struggle would not be won overnight. In fact, the era of apartheid was only just about to formally start. Although apartheid is typically dated from the late 1940s until its dismantling decades later, segregationist policies had been the norm in South Africa from nearly the moment European explorers sailed to the region and began settling there. Whether it was displacing and fighting indigenous groups like the Khoi and San, or fighting other whites like the Boer, separation between ethnicities was the norm in South Africa for centuries before the election of Malan signaled the true rise of the Afrikaner far right. The man most associated with dismantling apartheid, of course, is Nelson Mandela. With the official policy of apartheid instituted in 1948 by an all-white government, Mandela was tried for treason between the years of 1956-61 before being acquitted. He participated in the Defiance Campaign of 1952, and oversaw the 1955 Congress of the People, but when the African National Congress was banned in 1960, he proposed a military wing, despite his initial reluctance toward violent resistance, a reluctance which had its roots in original nonviolent protests through the South African Communist Party. The ANC did not openly discourage such an idea, and the Umkhonto we Sizwe was established. Mandela was again arrested in 1962 and tried for attempts to overthrow the government by violence. The sentence was five years of hard labor, but this was increased to a life sentence in 1964, a sentence handed down to seven of his closest colleagues as well.  Mandela would eventually serve 27 years, but his statements made in court received enormous international coverage and acclaim, and his reputation grew during his time in Robben Island Prison of Capetown, the Pollsmoor and Victor Verster Prisons. He was ultimately released in February 1990, in large part as a result of the international campaign generated by his words and the current South African story. Shortly after that, he was elected as the first man of African descent to the presidency of South Africa, which he held from 1994-1999. Most significant was that Mandela was elected from the first multi-factional, multi-racial election ever held in the country, a result of extensive negotiations with then President F.W. Klerk. Apartheid in South Africa: The History and Legacy of the Notorious Segregationist Policies in the 20th Century looks at the controversial policies, the background behind them, and their influence on the country. Along with pictures and a bibliography, you will learn about apartheid in South Africa like never before.

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Appeasing Hitler: Chamberlain, Churchill and the Road to War Audiobook

Appeasing Hitler: Chamberlain, Churchill and the Road to War

Author: Tim Bouverie Narrator: John L. Sessions, John Sessions Release Date: April 2019

Random House presents the audiobook edition of Appeasing Hitler by Tim Bouverie, read by John Sessions. 'Appeasing Hitler is an astonishingly accomplished debut. Bouverie writes with a wonderful clarity and we will no doubt hear a lot more of his voice in future' ANTONY BEEVOR On a wet afternoon in September 1938, Neville Chamberlain stepped off an aeroplane and announced that his visit to Hitler had averted the greatest crisis in recent memory. It was, he later assured the crowd in Downing Street, 'peace for our time'. Less than a year later, Germany invaded Poland and the Second World War began. Appeasing Hitler is a compelling new narrative history of the disastrous years of indecision, failed diplomacy and parliamentary infighting that enabled Nazi domination of Europe. Beginning with the advent of Hitler in 1933, it sweeps from the early days of the Third Reich to the beaches of Dunkirk. Bouverie takes us into the backrooms of 10 Downing Street and Parliament, where a small group of rebellious MPs, including the indomitable Winston Churchill, were among the few to realise that the only choice was between 'war now or war later'. And we enter the drawing rooms and dining clubs of fading imperial Britain, where Hitler enjoyed surprising support among the ruling class and even some members of the Royal Family. Drawing on deep archival research, including previously unseen sources, this is an unforgettable portrait of the ministers, aristocrats and amateur diplomats who, through their actions and inaction, shaped their country's policy and determined the fate of Europe. Both sweeping and intimate, Appeasing Hitler is not only eye-opening history but a timeless lesson on the challenges of standing up to aggression and authoritarianism - and the calamity that results from failing to do so.

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Apprendre l'Allemand: Histoires Courtes pour  Débutants et Avancés - A2-B1: 12 Histoires Faciles en  Audiobook

Apprendre l'Allemand: Histoires Courtes pour Débutants et Avancés - A2-B1: 12 Histoires Faciles en

Author: Fiona Wagenar Narrator: Christian Woelfig, Yoan Fournier-Moreau Release Date: April 2021

Vous en avez assez d'apprendre l'allemand à travers des manuels?Vous souhaitez vérifier de manière concrète votre niveau d'allemand ?Améliorez vos compétences en allemand et développez votre vocabulaire avec ces 12 nouvelles intéressantes en allemand, faciles à lire, à écouter et à comprendre. Ces histoires sont réalistes, amusantes et instructives! Dans ces histoires, vous trouverez de nombreux dialogues réalistes qui vous permettront d'améliorer votre capacité d'expression et de compréhension. Utiliser une grammaire facile à comprendre et des mots couramment utilisés vous aideront à apprendre de nouvelles structures grammaticales sans être dépassé. Ce livre vous aidera à: 1. Apprendre un nouveau vocabulaire 2. Apprendre de nouvelles expressions sur un sujet particulier 3. Aprrendre le vocabulaire de tous les jours utilisé pour communiquer avec les gens dans les dialogues 4. Apprendre quelques phrases typiques qui sont souvent utilisées dans les dialogues en allemand 5. Corriger et / ou améliorer la prononciation 6. Améliorer vos capacités de compréhension en écoutant 7. Améliorer simplement votre allemand, quel que soit votre niveau de débutant Obtenez votre copie du livre audio et commencez à apprendre dès aujourd'hui.

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Arches across the Roman Empire: The History of the Roman Arches Built in Europe, the Middle East, As Audiobook

Arches across the Roman Empire: The History of the Roman Arches Built in Europe, the Middle East, As

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Gregory T. Luzitano Release Date: January 2020

Some of the most iconic symbols of the Roman Empire that have survived into the modern world today are the arches that Romans erected to commemorate military victories and glorify individual emperors. The story of how arches came to be used throughout the Roman world in such a way is one that involves the evolution of the military and its leaders into the political forces that came to dominate the state, and those arches, along with the triumphs that came to be associated with many of them, were key parts in the process of exhibiting the might of both Rome. At the same time, they were meant to mark the individual achievements of Rome’s rulers, making them an enormous and expensive PR exercise that steadily grew over the years. Of course, Roman arches have intrigued historians for years. Franz Botho Graef, a German classical archaeologist and art historian, a prominent expert in the area, devoted his life to the identification and cataloguing of Roman arches. He documented 125 extant arches, and 30 further examples discerned from the literature or other sources, scattered throughout Rome and its provinces. Graef’s listing is usually taken as the starting point for subsequent researchers, but another eminent historian in the field, A. Frothingham, has disputed Graef´s listings, arguing that only 115 of the 125 identified arches actually existed. He also claimed to have identified 280 further “monuments and arches,” the majority of which were located within Asia Minor, North Africa, and Syria. However, this methodological approach introduced a new category – monuments - into the cataloguing process, which has only served to complicate the debate.

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Ardennes 1944: Hitler's Last Gamble Audiobook

Ardennes 1944: Hitler's Last Gamble

Author: Antony Beevor Narrator: Sean Barrett Release Date: May 2015

Penguin presents the unabridged, downloadable, audiobook edition of Ardennes 1994 by Antony Beever, read by Sean Barrett. On 16 December 1944, Hitler launched his 'last gamble' in the snow-covered forests and gorges of the Ardennes on the Belgian/German border. Although Hitler's generals were doubtful of success, younger officers and NCOs were desperate to believe that their homes and families could be saved from the vengeful Red Army approaching from the east. The Ardennes offensive, with more than a million men involved, became the greatest battle of the war in western Europe. In January 1945, when the Red Army launched its onslaught towards Berlin, the once-feared German war machine was revealed to be broken beyond repair. The Ardennes was the battle which finally broke the Wehrmacht.

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Argentina: The History and Legacy of the Nation from the Colonial Era to Today Audiobook

Argentina: The History and Legacy of the Nation from the Colonial Era to Today

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Colin Fluxman Release Date: February 2020

By the time Christopher Columbus started setting east from the New World, he had explored San Salvador in the Bahamas (which he thought was Japan), Cuba (which he thought was China), and Hispaniola, the source of gold. As the common story goes, Columbus, en route back to Spain from his first journey, called in at Lisbon as a courtesy to brief the Portuguese King John II of his discovery of the New World. King John subsequently protested that according to the 1479 Treaty of Alcáçovas, which divided the Atlantic Ocean between Spanish and Portuguese spheres of influence, the newly discovered lands rightly belonged to Portugal. To make clear the point, a Portuguese fleet was authorized and dispatched west from the Tagus to lay claim to the “Indies,” which prompted a flurry of diplomatic activity in the court of Ferdinand and Isabella. At the time, Spain lacked the naval power to prevent Portugal from acting on this threat, and the result was the hugely influential 1494 Treaty of Tordesillas. Perhaps inevitably, a regional rivalry had developed as the Portuguese began to establish a colony in Brazil and push its boundaries southwards. After the conquest of the Incas in the 1530s, the Portuguese threat prompted the authorization of a second expedition, commanded this time by Pedro de Mendoza with a force of some 1,500 men. The party arrived at the mouth of the Río de la Plata in 1536, and there Mendoza founded the settlement of Nuestra Señora Santa María del Buen Ayre. This was the basis of the future city of Buenos Aires, but its establishment was not without resistance from surrounding tribes, marking the kind of conflicts that would shape the history and independence movements of Argentina over the next 300 years.

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Aristotle's Children: How Christian, Muslims and Jews Rediscovered Ancient Wisdom and Illuminated th Audiobook

Aristotle's Children: How Christian, Muslims and Jews Rediscovered Ancient Wisdom and Illuminated th

Author: Richard E. Rubenstein Narrator: Nelson Runger Release Date: October 2003

Europe was in the long slumber of the Middle Ages, the Roman Empire was in tatters, and the Greek language was all but forgotten, until a group of twelfth-century scholars rediscovered and translated the works of Aristotle. His ideas spread like wildfire across Europe, offering the scientific view that the natural world, including the soul of man, was a proper subject of study. The rediscovery of these ancient ideas sparked riots and heresy trials, caused major upheavals in the Catholic Church, and also set the stage for today's rift between reason and religion. In Aristotle's Children, Richard Rubenstein transports us back in history, rendering the controversies of the Middle Ages lively and accessible-and allowing us to understand the philosophical ideas that are fundamental to modern thought.

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