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Europe Audiobooks in Travel

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LoveReading Top 10

  1. How to Own the Room: Women and the Art of Brilliant Speaking Audiobook How to Own the Room: Women and the Art of Brilliant Speaking
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  2. Between the World and Me Audiobook Between the World and Me
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  3. The Gates of Athens: Book One of Athenian Audiobook The Gates of Athens: Book One of Athenian
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  4. Written in Blood Audiobook Written in Blood
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  5. The Giver of Stars: Fall in love with the enchanting Sunday Times bestseller from the author of Me B Audiobook The Giver of Stars: Fall in love with the enchanting Sunday Times bestseller from the author of Me B
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  6. The Last Widow Audiobook The Last Widow
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  7. Daughters of Cornwall Audiobook Daughters of Cornwall
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  8. How Do We Know We're Doing It Right?: Essays on Modern Life Audiobook How Do We Know We're Doing It Right?: Essays on Modern Life
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  9. The Facilitator Audiobook The Facilitator
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  10. The Lying Life of Adults Audiobook The Lying Life of Adults
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Atomic Spy: The Dark Lives of Klaus Fuchs Audiobook

Atomic Spy: The Dark Lives of Klaus Fuchs

Author: Nancy Thorndike Greenspan Narrator: Tavia Gilbert Release Date: May 2020

'Nancy Greenspan dives into the mysteries of the Klaus Fuchs espionage case and emerges with a classic Cold War biography of intrigue and torn loyalties. Atomic Spy is a mesmerizing morality tale, told with fresh sources and empathy.' --Kai Bird, author of The Good Spy and coauthor of American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer The gripping biography of a notorious Cold War villain--the German-born British scientist who handed the Soviets top-secret American plans for the plutonium bomb--showing a man torn between conventional loyalties and a sense of obligation to a greater good. German by birth, British by naturalization, Communist by conviction, Klaus Fuchs was a fearless Nazi resister, a brilliant scientist, and an infamous spy. He was convicted of espionage by Britain in 1950 for handing over the designs of the plutonium bomb to the Russians, and has gone down in history as one of the most dangerous agents in American and British history. He put an end to America's nuclear hegemony and single-handedly heated up the Cold War. But, was Klaus Fuchs really evil? Using archives long hidden in Germany as well as intimate family correspondence, Nancy Thorndike Greenspan brings into sharp focus the moral and political ambiguity of the times in which Fuchs lived and the ideals with which he struggled. As a university student in Germany, he stood up to Nazi terror without flinching, and joined the Communists largely because they were the only ones resisting the Nazis. After escaping to Britain in 1933, he was arrested as a German émigré--an 'enemy alien'--in 1940 and sent to an internment camp in Canada. His mentor at university, renowned physicist Max Born, worked to facilitate his release. After years of struggle and ideological conflict, when Fuchs joined the atomic bomb project, his loyalties were firmly split. He started handing over top secret research to the Soviets in 1941, and continued for years from deep within the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos. Greenspan's insights into his motivations make us realize how he was driven not just by his Communist convictions but seemingly by a dedication to peace, seeking to level the playing field of the world powers. With thrilling detail from never-before-seen sources, Atomic Spy travels across the Germany of an ascendant Nazi party; the British university classroom of Max Born; a British internment camp in Canada; the secret laboratories of Los Alamos; and Eastern Germany at the height of the Cold War. Atomic Spy shows the real Klaus Fuchs--who he was, what he did, why he did it, and how he was caught. His extraordinary life is a cautionary tale about the ambiguity of morality and loyalty, as pertinent today as in the 1940s.

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Audyt Audiobook

Audyt

Jacek Hugo-Bader once again embarks on a trip around Poland. He returns to matters, events, and places from 20-30 years ago. He meets with the people from the front pages of "Gazeta Wyborcza": bandits, bums, converted, rednecks, and chosen - this is the face of modern Poland which is so easy to turn one's back to. The reporter discovers that his previous writings about these people were dwarfed by the stories which life wrote for them.

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Avenue of Spies: A True Story of Terror, Espionage, and One American Family's Heroic Resistance in N Audiobook

Avenue of Spies: A True Story of Terror, Espionage, and One American Family's Heroic Resistance in N

Author: Alex Kershaw Narrator: Mark Deakins Release Date: August 2015

The best-selling author of The Liberator brings to life the incredible true story of an American doctor in Paris, and his heroic espionage efforts during World War II The leafy Avenue de Foch, one of the most exclusive residential streets in Nazi-occupied France, was Paris's hotbed of daring spies, murderous secret police, amoral informers, and Vichy collaborators. So when American physician Sumner Jackson, who lived with his wife and young son Phillip at Number 11, found himself drawn into the Liberation network of the French resistance, he knew the stakes were impossibly high. Just down the road at Number 31 was the "mad sadist" Theodor Dannecker, an Eichmann prot

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Back Over There: One American Time-Traveler, 100 Years Since the Great War, 500 Miles of Battle-Scar Audiobook

Back Over There: One American Time-Traveler, 100 Years Since the Great War, 500 Miles of Battle-Scar

Author: Richard Rubin Narrator: Richard Rubin Release Date: April 2017

In The Last of the Doughboys, Richard Rubin introduced listeners to a forgotten generation of Americans: the men and women who fought and won the First World War. Interviewing the war's last survivors face-to-face, he knew well the importance of being present if you want to get the real story. But he soon came to realize that to get the whole story, he had to go Over There, too. So he did, and discovered that while most Americans regard that war as dead and gone, to the French, who still live among its ruins and memories, it remains very much alive. Years later, with the centennial of the war only magnifying this paradox, Rubin decided to go back Over There to see if he could, at last, resolve it. For months he followed the trail of the American Expeditionary Forces on the Western Front, finding trenches, tunnels, bunkers, century-old graffiti and ubiquitous artifacts. But he also found an abiding fondness for America and Americans, and a colorful corps of local after-hours historians and archeologists who tirelessly explore these sites and preserve the memories they embody while patiently waiting for Americans to return and reclaim their own history and heritage. None of whom seemed to mind that his French needed work. Based on his wildly popular New York Times series, Back Over There is a timely journey, in turns reverent and iconoclastic but always fascinating, through a place where the past and present are never really separated. This program is read by the author.

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Bailout Over Normandy: A Flyboy's Adventures with the French Resistance and Other Escapades in Occup Audiobook

Bailout Over Normandy: A Flyboy's Adventures with the French Resistance and Other Escapades in Occup

Author: Ted Fahrenwald Narrator: Corey M. Snow Release Date: December 2016

A daredevil pilot in the famed 352nd Fighter Squadron, the author of this remarkable memoir bailed out of his burning Mustang two days after D-Day and was launched on a thrilling adventure on the ground in Occupied France. After months living and fighting with the French Resistance, Fahrenwald was captured by the Wehrmacht, interrogated as a spy, and interned in a POW camp-and made a daring escape just before his deportation to Germany. Nothing diminished this pilot's talent for spotting the ironic humor in even the most aggravating or dangerous situations-nor his penchant for extracting his own improvised and sometimes hilarious version of justice. A suspenseful World War II account and an outrageously witty tale of daring and friendship, this book brings to vivid life the daily bravery, mischief, and intrigues of fighter pilots, Resistance fighters, and other Allies in the air and on the ground.

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Balkan Ghosts: A Journey Through History Audiobook

Balkan Ghosts: A Journey Through History

Author: Robert D. Kaplan Narrator: Nigel Patterson Release Date: January 2020

From the assassination that triggered World War I to the ethnic warfare in Serbia, Bosnia, and Croatia, the Balkans have been the crucible of the twentieth century, the place where terrorism and genocide first became tools of policy. Chosen as one of the Best Books of the Year by the New York Times, and greeted with critical acclaim as 'the most insightful and timely work on the Balkans to date'-The Boston Globe, Kaplan's prescient, enthralling, and often chilling political travelogue is already a modern classic. This new edition of the Balkan Ghost includes six opinion pieces written by Robert Kaplan about the Balkans between 1996 and 2000 beginning just after the implementation of the Dayton Peace Accords and ending after the conclusion of the Kosovo war, with the removal of Slobodan Milosevic from power.

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Ballad of the Anarchist Bandits: The Crime Spree that Gripped Belle Epoque Paris Audiobook

Ballad of the Anarchist Bandits: The Crime Spree that Gripped Belle Epoque Paris

Author: John Merriman Narrator: Peter Ganim Release Date: October 2017

For six terrifying months in 1911-1912, the citizens of Paris were gripped by a violent crime streak. A group of bandits went on a rampage throughout the city and its suburbs, robbing banks and wealthy Parisians, killing anyone who got in their way, and always managing to stay one step ahead of the police. But Jules Bonnot and the Bonnot Gang weren't just ordinary criminals; they were anarchists, motivated by the rampant inequality and poverty in Paris. John Merriman tells this story through the eyes of two young, idealistic lovers: Victor Kibaltchiche (later the famed Russian revolutionary and writer Victor Serge) and Rirette Maîtrejean, who chronicled the Bonnot crime spree in the radical newspaper L'Anarchie. While wealthy Parisians frequented restaurants on the Champs-Élysées, attended performances at the magnificent new opera house, and enjoyed the decadence of the so-called Belle Époque, Victor, Rirette, and their friends occupied a vast sprawl of dank apartments, bleak canals, and smoky factories. Victor and Rirette rejected the violence of Bonnot and his cronies, but to the police it made no difference. Victor was imprisoned for years for his anarchist beliefs, Bonnot was hunted down and shot dead, and his fellow bandits were sentenced to death by guillotine or lifelong imprisonment. Fast-paced and gripping, Ballad of the Anarchist Bandits is a tale of idealists and lost causes-and a vivid evocation of Paris in the dizzying years before the horrors of World War I were unleashed. **Contact Customer Service for Additional Material**

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Basilica: The Splendor and the Scandal - Building St. Peter's Audiobook

Basilica: The Splendor and the Scandal - Building St. Peter's

Author: R.A. Scotti Narrator: Josephine Bailey Release Date: June 2006

It was the splendor---and the scandal---of the age. In 1506, the ferociously ambitious Renaissance Pope Julius II tore down the most sacred shrine in Europe---the millennium-old St. Peter's Basilica built by the Emperor Constantine over the apostle's grave---to build a better basilica. Construction of the new St. Peter's spanned two centuries, embroiled twenty-seven popes, and consumed the genius of the greatest artists of the age---Michaelangelo, Bramante, Raphael, and Bernini. The cost of building the new cathedral was costly in more than just monetary terms---the new basilica provoked the Protestant Reformation, dividing the Christian world for all time. In this swift, colorful narrative, R. A. Scotti brings to life the artists and the popes, the politics and the passions behind this audacious enterprise. Scotti turns sacred architecture into a spellbinding human epic of enormous daring, petty jealousy, and staggering genius.

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Battle of Kosovo, The: The History and Legacy of the Battle Between the Serbs and Ottomans that Forg Audiobook

Battle of Kosovo, The: The History and Legacy of the Battle Between the Serbs and Ottomans that Forg

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Daniel Houle Release Date: November 2019

Given how tightly the Serbs have historically been clinging to the Battle of Kosovo, which was fought on June 28, 1389 on the Kosovo plain in southern Serbia against the fledgling Ottoman Empire, it’s somewhat surprising what actually happened there. There can be no doubt that it is regarded as an important and indeed iconic battle in European history, but at first glance it is difficult to see why. Though neither side fielded more than 40,000 men, it was a bloody battle that all but spelled the end of the Serbian nation. The Ottoman Sultan Murad I arrived backed up by a neighboring beylik from Anatolia, and together they faced the Serbian Prince Lazar, together with allies from Kosovo and Bosnia. As some sources claim, it is also likely that the Knight Hospitaller from Croatia fought on the Serbian side, and anachronistic records state that the Serbian army was larger than Murad’s. Murad had both his sons with him, Bayezid and Yakub, commanding one wing each. Initially, it looked like the Serbs would prevail, and the Ottoman forces conceded heavy losses during the first hours. However, in a frenzy of bloodthirst and revenge, Bayezid led his wing in a counterattack towards the knights, whose heavy armor became a hindrance for their retreat. Bayezid slaughtered a great number of the Serbian soldiers, and Prince Lazar’s ally, Vuc Branković from Kosovo, fled the field trying to rescue as many men as possible. At this point, Prince Lazar had probably been captured or killed in the heat of the battle. 

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Battleground Prussia: The Assault on Germany's Eastern Front 1944-45 Audiobook

Battleground Prussia: The Assault on Germany's Eastern Front 1944-45

Author: Prit Buttar Narrator: Nigel Patterson Release Date: October 2019

The terrible months between the arrival of the Red Army on German soil and the final collapse of Hitler's regime were like no other in the Second World War. The Soviet Army's intent to take revenge for the horror that the Nazis had wreaked on their people produced a conflict of implacable brutality in which millions perished. From the great battles that marked the Soviet conquest of East and West Prussia to the final surrender in the Vistula estuary, this book recounts in chilling detail the desperate struggle of soldiers and civilians alike. These brutal campaigns are brought vividly to life by a combination of previously unseen testimony and astute strategic analysis recognizing a conflict of unprecedented horror and suffering.

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Becoming Queen Victoria: The Unexpected Rise of Britain's Greatest Monarch Audiobook

Becoming Queen Victoria: The Unexpected Rise of Britain's Greatest Monarch

Author: Kate Williams Narrator: Katharine McEwan Release Date: December 2016

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • The perfect companion to the upcoming PBS Masterpiece series Victoria • A gripping account of Queen Victoria’s rise and early years in power from CNN’s official royal historian “Kate Williams has perfected the art of historical biography. Her pacy writing is underpinned by the most impeccable scholarship.”—Alison Weir In 1819, a girl was born to the fourth son of King George III. No one could have expected such an unassuming, overprotected girl to be an effective ruler—yet Queen Victoria would become one of the most powerful monarchs in history. Writing with novelistic flair and historical precision, Kate Williams reveals a vibrant woman in the prime of her life, while chronicling the byzantine machinations that continued even after the crown was placed on her head. Upon hearing that she had inherited the throne, eighteen-year-old Victoria banished her overambitious mother from the room, a simple yet resolute move that would set the tone for her reign. The queen clashed constantly not only with her mother and her mother’s adviser, the Irish adventurer John Conroy, but with her ministers and even her beloved Prince Albert—all of whom attempted to seize control from her. Williams lays bare the passions that swirled around the throne—the court secrets, the sexual repression, and the endless intrigue. The result is a grand tale of a woman whose destiny began long before she was born and whose legacy lives on. Praise for Becoming Queen Victoria “An informative, entertaining, gossipy tale.”—Publishers Weekly “A great read . . . With lively writing, Ms. Williams [makes] the story fresh and appealing.”—The Washington Times “Sparkling, engaging.”—Open Letters Monthly

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Beer in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance Audiobook

Beer in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance

Author: Richard W. Unger Narrator: John Pruden Release Date: November 2010

Modern beer has little in common with the drink that carried that name through the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Looking at a time when beer was often a nutritional necessity, was sometimes used as medicine, could be flavored with everything from the bark of fir trees to thyme and fresh eggs, and was consumed by men, women, and children alike, Beer in the Middle Ages and Renaissance presents an extraordinarily detailed history of the business, art, and governance of brewing. During the medieval and early modern periods beer was as much a daily necessity as a source of inebriation and amusement. It was the beverage of choice of urban populations that lacked access to secure sources of potable water; a commodity of economic as well as social importance; a safe drink for daily consumption that was less expensive than wine; and a major source of tax revenue for the state. In Beer in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, Richard W. Unger has written an encompassing study of beer as both a product and an economic force in Europe. Weaving together the stories of prosperous businessmen, skilled brewmasters, and small producers, this impressively researched overview of the social and cultural practices that surrounded the beer industry is rich in implication for the history of the period as both a product and an economic force in Europe.

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