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Europe Audiobooks in Travel

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LoveReading Top 10

  1. How to Own the Room: Women and the Art of Brilliant Speaking Audiobook How to Own the Room: Women and the Art of Brilliant Speaking
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  2. Between the World and Me Audiobook Between the World and Me
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  3. The Gates of Athens: Book One of Athenian Audiobook The Gates of Athens: Book One of Athenian
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  4. Written in Blood Audiobook Written in Blood
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  5. The Giver of Stars: Fall in love with the enchanting Sunday Times bestseller from the author of Me B Audiobook The Giver of Stars: Fall in love with the enchanting Sunday Times bestseller from the author of Me B
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  6. The Last Widow Audiobook The Last Widow
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  7. Daughters of Cornwall Audiobook Daughters of Cornwall
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  8. How Do We Know We're Doing It Right?: Essays on Modern Life Audiobook How Do We Know We're Doing It Right?: Essays on Modern Life
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  9. The Facilitator Audiobook The Facilitator
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  10. The Lying Life of Adults Audiobook The Lying Life of Adults
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An Iron Wind: Europe Under Hitler Audiobook

An Iron Wind: Europe Under Hitler

Author: Peter Fritzsche Narrator: Sean Runnette Release Date: November 2016

World War II reached into the homes and lives of ordinary people in an unprecedented way. Civilians made up the vast majority of those killed by war. On Europe's home front, the war brought the German blitzkrieg, followed by long occupations and the racial genocide of the Holocaust. In An Iron Wind, historian Peter Fritzsche draws on first-person accounts to show how civilians in occupied Europe struggled to understand this maelstrom. As Germany targeted Europe's Jews for deportation and death, confusion and mistrust reigned. People tried desperately to make sense of the horrors around them, but the stories they told themselves often justified a selfish indifference to their neighbors' fates. Piecing together the broken words of World War II's witnesses and victims-probing what they saw and what they failed to see-Fritzsche offers a haunting picture of the most violent conflict in human history.

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An Utterly Exasperated History of Modern Britain: or Sixty Years of Making the Same Stupid Mistakes  Audiobook

An Utterly Exasperated History of Modern Britain: or Sixty Years of Making the Same Stupid Mistakes

Author: John O'farrell Narrator: John O'farrell Release Date: October 2009

Following his hugely popular account of the previous 2000 years, John O'Farrell now comes bang up to date with a hilarious modern history asking 'How the hell did we end up here?' An Utterly Exasperated History of Modern Britain informs, elucidates and laughs at all the bizarre events, ridiculous characters and stupid decisions that have shaped Britain's story since 1945; leaving the Twenty-First Century reader feeling fantastically smug for having the benefit of hindsight.

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And the Show Went on: Cultural Life in Nazi-Occupied Paris Audiobook

And the Show Went on: Cultural Life in Nazi-Occupied Paris

Author: Alan Riding Narrator: Stephen Hoye Release Date: October 2010

An evocative and penetrating account of cultural life in wartime Paris and of the moral and artistic choices artists faced under the Nazi occupation.

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Anglo-Saxons: A Captivating Guide to the People Who Inhabited Great Britain from the Early Middle Ag Audiobook

Anglo-Saxons: A Captivating Guide to the People Who Inhabited Great Britain from the Early Middle Ag

Author: Captivating History Narrator: Randy Whitlow Release Date: June 2019

If you want to discover the captivating history of the Anglo-Saxons, then pay attention... There was a time before England was united. This was a time before William the Bastard decided to prove to his contemporaries that his bastard moniker would be erased with a swift conquest of the biggest island northwest of Europe. A time before the Battle of Hastings and the year 1066. A time when many petty kingdoms ruled, conquered, and were liberated, time and time again, by a specific people group. A people group that is, in fact, a blend of many and that authors of later dates would collectively call the Anglo-Saxons. The Anglo-Saxons were, indeed, an odd group of people to take control of Britain. But they didn't do it all at once, and just like any other people in history, they had a period of adjustment, growth, reconstruction, and eventual rise to prominence.  In Anglo-Saxons: A Captivating Guide to the People Who Inhabited Great Britain from the Early Middle Ages to the Norman Conquest of England, you will discover topics such as Anglo-Saxons ArriveEarly Anglo-Saxons: Origins and Pre-Settlement HistoryThe Culture of Anglo-Saxons: Religion, Customs, Social Hierarchy, Early ChristianityEveryday Life of Anglo-Saxon England: Jobs and Division of Labor, Food and Drink, Clothes, Architecture, Travel, Wars, Gender and Age Norms, Art, Written WorksAnglo-Saxon KingdomsAnglo-Saxon LegacyAnd much, much more!So if you want to learn more about the history of the Anglo-Saxons, scroll up and click the 'add to cart' button!

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Anne Boleyn, A King's Obsession Audiobook

Anne Boleyn, A King's Obsession

Author: Alison Weir Narrator: Rosalyn Landor Release Date: May 2017

A novel filled with fresh insights into the story of Henry VIII's second-and most infamous-wife, Anne Boleyn. The new book in the epic Six Tudor Queens series, from the acclaimed historian and bestselling author of Katherine of Aragon. It is the spring of 1527. Henry VIII has come to Hever Castle in Kent to pay court to Anne Boleyn. He is desperate to have her. For this mirror of female perfection he will set aside his Queen and all Cardinal Wolsey's plans for a dynastic French marriage. Anne Boleyn is not so sure. She loathes Wolsey for breaking her betrothal to the Earl of Northumberland's son, Harry Percy, whom she had loved. She does not welcome the King's advances; she knows that she can never give him her heart. But hers is an opportunist family. And whether Anne is willing or not, they will risk it all to see their daughter on the throne.

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Apartheid in South Africa: The History and Legacy of the Notorious Segregationist Policies in the 20 Audiobook

Apartheid in South Africa: The History and Legacy of the Notorious Segregationist Policies in the 20

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Colin Fluxman Release Date: March 2019

"During my lifetime I have dedicated myself to this struggle of the African people. I have fought against white domination, and I have fought against black domination. I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons will live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal which I hope to live for. But, my lord, if needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die." - Nelson Mandela, 1964 On June 1, 1948, Daniel Malan arrived in Pretoria by train to take office, and there he was met by a huge crowd of cheering whites. He told the audience, "In the past, we felt like strangers in our own country, but today, South Africa belongs to us once more. For the first time since Union, South Africa is our own. May God grant that it always remain our own." Back in Johannesburg, the leadership of the ANC, including the young attorney Nelson Mandela, listened to these celebratory prognostications in a grim mood. As strangers in their own country, they all understood that the South African liberation struggle would not be won overnight. In fact, the era of apartheid was only just about to formally start. Although apartheid is typically dated from the late 1940s until its dismantling decades later, segregationist policies had been the norm in South Africa from nearly the moment European explorers sailed to the region and began settling there. Whether it was displacing and fighting indigenous groups like the Khoi and San, or fighting other whites like the Boer, separation between ethnicities was the norm in South Africa for centuries before the election of Malan signaled the true rise of the Afrikaner far right. The man most associated with dismantling apartheid, of course, is Nelson Mandela. With the official policy of apartheid instituted in 1948 by an all-white government, Mandela was tried for treason between the years of 1956-61 before being acquitted. He participated in the Defiance Campaign of 1952, and oversaw the 1955 Congress of the People, but when the African National Congress was banned in 1960, he proposed a military wing, despite his initial reluctance toward violent resistance, a reluctance which had its roots in original nonviolent protests through the South African Communist Party. The ANC did not openly discourage such an idea, and the Umkhonto we Sizwe was established. Mandela was again arrested in 1962 and tried for attempts to overthrow the government by violence. The sentence was five years of hard labor, but this was increased to a life sentence in 1964, a sentence handed down to seven of his closest colleagues as well.  Mandela would eventually serve 27 years, but his statements made in court received enormous international coverage and acclaim, and his reputation grew during his time in Robben Island Prison of Capetown, the Pollsmoor and Victor Verster Prisons. He was ultimately released in February 1990, in large part as a result of the international campaign generated by his words and the current South African story. Shortly after that, he was elected as the first man of African descent to the presidency of South Africa, which he held from 1994-1999. Most significant was that Mandela was elected from the first multi-factional, multi-racial election ever held in the country, a result of extensive negotiations with then President F.W. Klerk. Apartheid in South Africa: The History and Legacy of the Notorious Segregationist Policies in the 20th Century looks at the controversial policies, the background behind them, and their influence on the country. Along with pictures and a bibliography, you will learn about apartheid in South Africa like never before.

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Appeasing Hitler: Chamberlain, Churchill and the Road to War Audiobook

Appeasing Hitler: Chamberlain, Churchill and the Road to War

Author: Tim Bouverie Narrator: John L. Sessions, John Sessions Release Date: April 2019

Random House presents the audiobook edition of Appeasing Hitler by Tim Bouverie, read by John Sessions. 'Appeasing Hitler is an astonishingly accomplished debut. Bouverie writes with a wonderful clarity and we will no doubt hear a lot more of his voice in future' ANTONY BEEVOR On a wet afternoon in September 1938, Neville Chamberlain stepped off an aeroplane and announced that his visit to Hitler had averted the greatest crisis in recent memory. It was, he later assured the crowd in Downing Street, 'peace for our time'. Less than a year later, Germany invaded Poland and the Second World War began. Appeasing Hitler is a compelling new narrative history of the disastrous years of indecision, failed diplomacy and parliamentary infighting that enabled Nazi domination of Europe. Beginning with the advent of Hitler in 1933, it sweeps from the early days of the Third Reich to the beaches of Dunkirk. Bouverie takes us into the backrooms of 10 Downing Street and Parliament, where a small group of rebellious MPs, including the indomitable Winston Churchill, were among the few to realise that the only choice was between 'war now or war later'. And we enter the drawing rooms and dining clubs of fading imperial Britain, where Hitler enjoyed surprising support among the ruling class and even some members of the Royal Family. Drawing on deep archival research, including previously unseen sources, this is an unforgettable portrait of the ministers, aristocrats and amateur diplomats who, through their actions and inaction, shaped their country's policy and determined the fate of Europe. Both sweeping and intimate, Appeasing Hitler is not only eye-opening history but a timeless lesson on the challenges of standing up to aggression and authoritarianism - and the calamity that results from failing to do so.

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Ardennes 1944: Hitler's Last Gamble Audiobook

Ardennes 1944: Hitler's Last Gamble

Author: Antony Beevor Narrator: Sean Barrett Release Date: May 2015

Penguin presents the unabridged, downloadable, audiobook edition of Ardennes 1994 by Antony Beever, read by Sean Barrett. On 16 December 1944, Hitler launched his 'last gamble' in the snow-covered forests and gorges of the Ardennes on the Belgian/German border. Although Hitler's generals were doubtful of success, younger officers and NCOs were desperate to believe that their homes and families could be saved from the vengeful Red Army approaching from the east. The Ardennes offensive, with more than a million men involved, became the greatest battle of the war in western Europe. In January 1945, when the Red Army launched its onslaught towards Berlin, the once-feared German war machine was revealed to be broken beyond repair. The Ardennes was the battle which finally broke the Wehrmacht.

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Aristotle's Children: How Christian, Muslims and Jews Rediscovered Ancient Wisdom and Illuminated th Audiobook

Aristotle's Children: How Christian, Muslims and Jews Rediscovered Ancient Wisdom and Illuminated th

Author: Richard E. Rubenstein Narrator: Nelson Runger Release Date: October 2003

Europe was in the long slumber of the Middle Ages, the Roman Empire was in tatters, and the Greek language was all but forgotten, until a group of twelfth-century scholars rediscovered and translated the works of Aristotle. His ideas spread like wildfire across Europe, offering the scientific view that the natural world, including the soul of man, was a proper subject of study. The rediscovery of these ancient ideas sparked riots and heresy trials, caused major upheavals in the Catholic Church, and also set the stage for today's rift between reason and religion. In Aristotle's Children, Richard Rubenstein transports us back in history, rendering the controversies of the Middle Ages lively and accessible-and allowing us to understand the philosophical ideas that are fundamental to modern thought.

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Arnhem: The Battle for the Bridges, 1944: The Sunday Times No 1 Bestseller Audiobook

Arnhem: The Battle for the Bridges, 1944: The Sunday Times No 1 Bestseller

Author: Antony Beevor Narrator: Sean Barrett Release Date: May 2018

Penguin presents the audiobook edition of Arnhem by Antony Beevor, read by Sean Barrett. On 17 September 1944, General Kurt Student, the founder of Nazi Germany's parachute forces, heard the growing roar of aero engines. He went out on to his balcony above the flat landscape of southern Holland to watch the vast air armada of Dakotas and gliders,carrying the British 1st Airborne and the American 101st and 82nd Airborne Divisions. He gazed up in envy at the greatest demonstration of paratroop power ever seen. Operation Market Garden, the plan to end the war by capturing the bridges leading to the Lower Rhine and beyond, was a bold concept: the Americans thought it unusually bold for Field Marshal Montgomery. But the cost of failure was horrendous, above all for the Dutch who risked everything to help. German reprisals were cruel and lasted until the end of the war. The British fascination for heroic failure has clouded the story of Arnhem in myths, not least that victory was possible when in fact the plan imposed by Montgomery and General 'Boy' Browning was doomed from the start. Antony Beevor, using many overlooked and new sources from Dutch, British, American, Polish and German archives, has reconstructed the terrible reality of this epic clash. Yet this book, written in Beevor's inimitable and gripping narrative style, is about much more than a single dramatic battle. It looks into the very heart of war.

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As Others See Us: The BBC Radio 4 series Audiobook

As Others See Us: The BBC Radio 4 series

Author: Neil Macgregor Narrator: Neil Macgregor Release Date: November 2019

All ten episodes of BBC Radio 4's ambitious global series, presented by Neil MacGregor 'Insightful, provocative, satisfying' Telegraph With the United Kingdom on the brink of potentially momentous change, historian and broadcaster Neil MacGregor embarks on a worldwide voyage to discover how Britain is perceived from abroad. Visiting Germany, Egypt, Nigeria, Canada, India, Singapore, the United States, Spain, Australia and Poland - all countries with significant historical links to the UK - he talks to leading opinion formers to find out how they, as individuals and members of their wider communities, see Britain. His interviewees reveal what they learnt about Britain at school, and how key events and cultural influences, as well as their own personal experiences, have shaped their impressions of the country now. Each has a defining image that symbolises the UK to them: from Shakespeare to Monty Python, the 1966 World Cup, the Suez Crisis, the Financial Times, '99' ice cream and The Crown. Throughout his travels, MacGregor uncovers tensions and frustrations, admiration and affection - along with an underlying sense of hope and a desire to retain close links with Britain as it prepares to reevaluate its relationship with Europe and the world.

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Asperger's Children: The Origins of Autism in Nazi Vienna Audiobook

Asperger's Children: The Origins of Autism in Nazi Vienna

Author: Edith Sheffer Narrator: Christa Lewis Release Date: July 2018

In 1930s and 1940s Vienna, child psychiatrist Hans Asperger sought to define autism as a diagnostic category, aiming to treat those children, usually boys, he deemed capable of participating fully in society. Depicted as a compassionate and devoted researcher, Asperger was in fact deeply influenced by Nazi psychiatry. Although he did offer individualized care to children he deemed promising, he also prescribed harsh institutionalization and even transfer to Spiegelgrund, one of the Reich's deadliest killing centers, for children with greater disabilities, who, he held, could not integrate into the community. With sensitivity and passion, Edith Sheffer's scrupulous research reveals the heartbreaking voices and experiences of many of these children, while also illuminating a Nazi regime obsessed with sorting the population into categories, cataloging people by race, heredity, politics, religion, sexuality, criminality, and biological defects?labels that became the basis of either rehabilitation or persecution and extermination.

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