LoveReading

Becoming a member of the LoveReading community is free.

No catches, no fine print just unadulterated book loving, with your favourite books saved to your own digital bookshelf.

New members get entered into our monthly draw to win £100 to spend in your local bookshop Plus lots lots more…

Find out more

Audiobooks Narrated by John Lee

Browse audiobooks narrated by John Lee, listen to samples and when you're ready head over to Audiobooks.com where you can get 2 FREE audiobooks on us

LoveReading Top 10

  1. Codename Villanelle: Killing Eve, Book 1 Audiobook Codename Villanelle: Killing Eve, Book 1
    1
  2. Hustle Harder, Hustle Smarter: Untitled Audiobook Hustle Harder, Hustle Smarter: Untitled
    2
  3. Just My Luck Audiobook Just My Luck
    3
  4. Girl, Woman, Other Audiobook Girl, Woman, Other
    4
  5. The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying: A simple, effective way to banish clutter forever Audiobook The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying: A simple, effective way to banish clutter forever
    5
  6. My Dark Vanessa Audiobook My Dark Vanessa
    6
  7. How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big: Kind of the Story of My Life Audiobook How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big: Kind of the Story of My Life
    7
  8. The Night Circus Audiobook The Night Circus
    8
  9. The Happy Ever After Playlist Audiobook The Happy Ever After Playlist
    9
  10. Naughty & Nasty: An Erotic Christmas Novella Audiobook Naughty & Nasty: An Erotic Christmas Novella
    10
Filter
The Double Life: Or, The Man with the Black Feather Audiobook

The Double Life: Or, The Man with the Black Feather

Author: Gaston LeRoux Narrator: John Lee Release Date: May 2020

A man named Adolphe visits Leroux at his office at the Morning Journal and delivers to him a chest that was bequeathed to him by his friend Theophraste Longuet. Leroux begins investigating its contents and relates the very strange experience of Longuet. While visiting a famous prison, Theophraste Longuet, a retired rubber stamp manufacturer, is possessed by the spirit of Cartouche, a criminal who plagued Paris in the eighteenth century. This wicked spirit overcomes Longuet more and more frequently, and Longuet begins, unwittingly, to commit the crimes for which Cartouche was known in the past.

Show more
The Pandemic Century: A History of Global Contagion from the Spanish Flu to Covid-19 Audiobook

The Pandemic Century: A History of Global Contagion from the Spanish Flu to Covid-19

Author: Mark Honigsbaum Narrator: John Lee Release Date: April 2020

Brought to you by Penguin. A Financial Times Best Book of the Year The most timely and informative history book you will read this year, tracing a century of pandemics. Ever since the 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic, scientists have dreamed of preventing catastrophic outbreaks of infectious disease. Yet, despite a century of medical progress, viral and bacterial disasters continue to take us by surprise, inciting panic and dominating news cycles. From the Spanish flu and the 1924 outbreak of pneumonic plague in Los Angeles, to the 1930 'parrot fever' pandemic and the more recent SARS, Ebola and Zika , the last 100 years have been marked by a succession of unanticipated pandemic alarms. In The Pandemic Century, Mark Honigsbaum chronicles 100 years of history in 10 outbreaks. This fast-paced, critically-acclaimed book combines science history, medical sociology and thrilling front-line reportage to deliver the story of our times. As we meet dedicated disease detectives, obstructive public health officials, and gifted scientists often blinded by their own expertise, we come face-to-face with the brilliance and medical hubris shaping both the frontier of science – and the future of humanity’s survival. © Mark Honigsbaum 2020 (P) Penguin Audio 2020

Show more
The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes: The Greatest Detective Stories: 1837–1914 Audiobook

The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes: The Greatest Detective Stories: 1837–1914

This masterful collection of seventeen classic mystery stories, dating from 1837 to 1914, traces the earliest history of popular detective fiction. Today, the figure of Sherlock Holmes towers over detective fiction like a colossus―but it was not always so. Edgar Allan Poe’s French detective Dupin, the hero of “The Murders in the Rue Morgue,” preceded Holmes’s deductive reasoning by more than forty years with his “tales of ratiocination.” In A Study in Scarlet, the first of Holmes’ adventures, Doyle acknowledged his debt to Poe―and to Émile Gaboriau, whose thief-turned-detective Monsieur Lecoq debuted in France twenty years earlier. If “Rue Morgue” was the first true detective story in English, the title of the first full-length detective novel is more hotly contested. Two books by Wilkie Collins―The Woman in White (1859) and The Moonstone (1868)―are often given that honor, with the latter showing many of the features that came to identify the genre: a locked-room murder in an English country house; bungling local detectives outmatched by a brilliant amateur detective; a large cast of suspects and a plethora of red herrings; and a final twist before the truth is revealed. Others point to Mary Elizabeth Braddon’s The Trail of the Serpent (1861) or Aurora Floyd (1862), and others still to The Notting Hill Mystery (1862–3) by the pseudonymous “Charles Felix.” As the early years of detective fiction gave way to two separate golden ages―of hard-boiled tales in America and intricately-plotted, so-called “cozy” murders in Britain―the legacy of Sherlock Holmes, with his fierce devotion to science and logic, gave way to street smarts on the one hand and social insight on the other―but even though these new sub-genres went their own ways, their detectives still required the intelligence and clear-sightedness that characterized the earliest works of detective fiction: the trademarks of Sherlock Holmes, and of all the detectives featured here.

Show more
The Dream Universe: How Fundamental Physics Lost Its Way Audiobook

The Dream Universe: How Fundamental Physics Lost Its Way

Author: David Lindley Narrator: John Lee Release Date: March 2020

A vivid and captivating narrative about how modern science broke free of ancient philosophy, and how theoretical physics is returning to its unscientific roots In the early seventeenth century Galileo broke free from the hold of ancient Platonic and Aristotelian philosophy. He drastically changed the framework through which we view the natural world when he asserted that we should base our theory of reality on what we can observe rather than pure thought. In the process, he invented what we would come to call science. This set the stage for all the breakthroughs that followed--from Kepler to Newton to Einstein. But in the early twentieth century when quantum physics, with its deeply complex mathematics, entered into the picture, something began to change. Many physicists began looking to the equations first and physical reality second. As we investigate realms further and further from what we can see and what we can test, we must look to elegant, aesthetically pleasing equations to develop our conception of what reality is. As a result, much of theoretical physics today is something more akin to the philosophy of Plato than the science to which the physicists are heirs. In The Dream Universe, Lindley asks what is science when it becomes completely untethered from measurable phenomena?

Show more
Adaptation Audiobook

Adaptation

Author: Devon C. Ford Narrator: John Lee Release Date: February 2020

The apocalypse continues in the penultimate chapter of the Toy Soldiers zombie survival series. Will anybody make it out alive?

Show more
The Mummy!: A Tale of the Twenty-Second Century Audiobook

The Mummy!: A Tale of the Twenty-Second Century

Published anonymously in three volumes in 1827, when the author was only seventeen years old, The Mummy! is, as she describes it herself, a strange, wild novel that-to an audience nearer her future than when Loudon imagined it-is filled with striking similarities to our modern world, including a form of the internet. But it is also filled with brilliant flights of fancy: her court ladies wear hair ornaments of controlled flame; surgeons and lawyers may be steam-powered automatons; people holiday by moving their entire home on rails. The visionary technological setting contrasts with a morality seemingly gone awry as it falls to the reanimated mummy Cheops to try to find a role in this corrupted society. A lost curio of Victorian futurism waiting to be discovered, The Mummy! is as bizarre and entertaining as its premise promises-and more. Its present-day appeal to fans of steampunk and Victorian settings is undeniable. This full-cast Skyboat Media production, adapted, produced, and directed by Gabrielle De Cuir, is the perfect vehicle to fully exploit Loudon's sophisticated visionary narrative, and bolster it with scenes of vivid character dialogue.

Show more
Twenty Years After Audiobook

Twenty Years After

Author: Alexandre Dumas Narrator: John Lee Release Date: December 2019

A new translation of Dumas's rousing sequel to The Three Musketeers, picking up twenty years after the conclusion of that classic novel and continuing the adventures of the valiant d'Artagnan and his three loyal friends The Three Musketeers, Alexandre Dumas's most famous and enduring novel, completed its serial publication in the summer of 1844, and by the time of its book publication at the end of that year, readers were already demanding a sequel. They got it starting in January 1845, when the first chapters of Twenty Years After began to appear?but it wasn't quite what they were expecting. When Twenty Years After opens it is 1648: the Red Sphinx, Cardinal Richelieu, is dead, France is ruled by a regency in the grip of civil war, and across the English Channel the monarchy of King Charles I hangs by a thread. As d'Artagnan will find, these are problems that can't be solved with a sword thrust. In Twenty Years After, the musketeers confront maturity and face its greatest challenge: sometimes, you fail. It's in how the four comrades respond to failure, and rise above it, that we begin to see the true characters of Dumas's great heroes. A true literary achievement, Twenty Years After is long overdue for a modern reassessment?and a new translation. As an added inducement, Lawrence Ellsworth has discovered a "lost" chapter that was overlooked in the novel's original publication, and is included in none of the available English translations to date?until now.

Show more
The Two Popes: Official Tie-in to Major New Film Starring Sir Anthony Hopkins Audiobook

The Two Popes: Official Tie-in to Major New Film Starring Sir Anthony Hopkins

Author: Anthony McCarten, Anthony Mccarten Narrator: John Lee Release Date: November 2019

Brought to you by Penguin. On 28 February 2013, a 600-year-old tradition was shattered: the conservative Pope Benedict XVI made a startling announcement. He would resign. Reeling from the news, the College of Cardinals rushed to Rome to congregate in the Sistine Chapel to pick his successor. Their unlikely choice? Francis, the first non-European pope in 1,200 years, a one time tango club bouncer, a passionate football fan, a man with the common touch. From the prize-winning screenwriter of The Theory of Everything and Darkest Hour, The Two Popes is a fascinating, revealing and often funny tale of two very different men whose destinies converge with each other - they both live in the Vatican - and the wider world. How did these two men become two of the most powerful people on Earth? What's it like to be the Pope? What does the future hold for the Catholic Church and its 1 billion followers? The Two Popes is a dual biography that masterfully combines these two popes' lives into one gripping narrative. From Benedict and Francis' experiences of war in their homelands - when they were still Joseph and Jorge - and the sexual abuse scandal that continues to rock the Church to its foundations, to the intrigue and the occasional comedy of life in the Vatican, The Two Popes glitters with the darker and the lighter details of life inside one of the world's most opaque but significant institutions.

Show more
A Conspiracy of Paper Audiobook

A Conspiracy of Paper

Author: David Liss Narrator: John Lee Release Date: October 2019

Benjamin Weaver is an outsider in eighteenth-century London: a Jew among Christians; a ruffian among aristocrats; a retired pugilist who, hired by London's gentry, travels through the criminal underworld in pursuit of debtors and thieves. In A Conspiracy of Paper, Weaver investigates a crime of the most personal sort: the mysterious death of his estranged father, a notorious stockjobber. To find the answers, Weaver must contend with a desperate prostitute who knows too much about his past, relatives who remind him of his alienation from the Jewish faith, and a cabal of powerful men in the world of British finance who have hidden their business dealings behind an intricate web of deception and violence. Relying on brains and brawn, Weaver uncovers the beginnings of a strange new economic order based on stock speculation-a way of life that poses great risk for investors but real danger for Weaver and his family. In the tradition of The Alienist and written with scholarly attention to period detail, A Conspiracy of Paper is one of the wittiest and most suspenseful historical novels in recent memory, as well as a perceptive and beguiling depiction of the origin of today's financial markets.

Show more
Notre-Dame: A Short History of the Meaning of Cathedrals Audiobook

Notre-Dame: A Short History of the Meaning of Cathedrals

Author: Ken Follett Narrator: John Lee, Ken Follett Release Date: October 2019

'Two days after Notre Dame burned, I flew to Paris to appear on the TV programme La Grande Librairie for a discussion about cathedrals. The following morning I had breakfast at the Hotel Bristol with my French publisher and she asked me to write a short book about Notre Dame and what it means to all of us. She said she would donate the publisher's profits to the rebuilding fund and, if I wished, I could do the same with my royalties. Yes, I said; of course, I'd love to.' Ken Follett In aid of the crucial restoration work to restore Paris's great cathedral, Notre-Dame: A Short History of the Meaning of Cathedrals is a moving, short piece of non-fiction celebrating the stunning history of this beloved building, from Ken Follett, author of the multi-million copy selling Kingsbridge series. A minimum of 50p per copy on each sale of this book will go to the charity La Fondation du Patrimoine.

Show more
Salvation Lost Audiobook

Salvation Lost

Author: Peter F. Hamilton Narrator: John Lee Release Date: October 2019

Humanity rises to meet a powerful alien threat, in this extraordinary sequel to Peter F. Hamilton's Salvation. This is a high-octane adventure from 'the most powerful imagination in science fiction' (Ken Follett). Fight together - or die alone . . . In the twenty-third century, humanity is enjoying a comparative utopia. Yet life on Earth is about to change, forever. Feriton Kane's investigative team has discovered the worst threat ever to face mankind - and we've almost no time to fight back. The supposedly benign Olyix plan to harvest humanity, in order to carry us to their god at the end of the universe. And as their agents conclude schemes down on earth, vast warships converge above to gather this cargo. Some factions push for humanity to flee, to live in hiding amongst the stars - although only a chosen few would make it out in time. But others refuse to break before the storm. As disaster looms, animosities must be set aside to focus on just one goal: wiping this enemy from the face of creation. Even if it means preparing for a future this generation will never see. Salvation Lost is the second book in the Salvation Sequence by Peter F. Hamilton 'Everything readers of Salvation will have hoped for. A series emerging as a modern classic' Stephen Baxter 'Brilliant and compelling. A masterclass in tension and spectacle' Gareth L. Powell

Show more
The Last Train to London: A Novel Audiobook

The Last Train to London: A Novel

Author: Meg Waite Clayton Narrator: John Lee Release Date: September 2019

The New York Times bestselling author of Beautiful Exiles conjures her best novel yet, a pre-World War II-era story with the emotional resonance of Orphan Train and All the Light We Cannot See, centering on the Kindertransports that carried thousands of children out of Nazi-occupied Europe-and one brave woman who helped them escape to safety. In 1936, the Nazi are little more than loud, brutish bores to fifteen-year old Stephan Neuman, the son of a wealthy and influential Jewish family and budding playwright whose playground extends from Vienna's streets to its intricate underground tunnels. Stephan's best friend and companion is the brilliant Žofie-Helene, a Christian girl whose mother edits a progressive, anti-Nazi newspaper. But the two adolescents' carefree innocence is shattered when the Nazis' take control. There is hope in the darkness, though. Truus Wijsmuller, a member of the Dutch resistance, risks her life smuggling Jewish children out of Nazi Germany to the nations that will take them. It is a mission that becomes even more dangerous after the Anschluss-Hitler's annexation of Austria-as, across Europe, countries close their borders to the growing number of refugees desperate to escape. Tante Truus, as she is known, is determined to save as many children as she can. After Britain passes a measure to take in at-risk child refugees from the German Reich, she dares to approach Adolf Eichmann, the man who would later help devise the "Final Solution to the Jewish Question," in a race against time to bring children like Stephan, his young brother Walter, and Žofie-Helene on a perilous journey to an uncertain future abroad.

Show more