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Computers Audiobooks in Science & Technology

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LoveReading Top 10

  1. Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man Audiobook Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man
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  2. The Sin Eater Audiobook The Sin Eater
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  3. Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You: A Remix of the National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Be Audiobook Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You: A Remix of the National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Be
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  4. Near Dark: A Thriller Audiobook Near Dark: A Thriller
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  5. Coming Home to Island House Audiobook Coming Home to Island House
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  6. Outsider: A Novel of Suspense Audiobook Outsider: A Novel of Suspense
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  7. What You Wish For: A Novel Audiobook What You Wish For: A Novel
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  8. The Alchemist Audiobook The Alchemist
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  9. Relationship Goals: How to Win at Dating, Marriage, and Sex Audiobook Relationship Goals: How to Win at Dating, Marriage, and Sex
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  10. Tempt Me Audiobook Tempt Me
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The Technological Singularity Audiobook

The Technological Singularity

Author: Murray Shanahan Narrator: Tim Andres Pabon Release Date: September 2015

The idea that human history is approaching a "singularity" -- that ordinary humans will someday be overtaken by artificially intelligent machines or cognitively enhanced biological intelligence, or both -- has moved from the realm of science fiction to serious debate. Some singularity theorists predict that if the field of artificial intelligence (AI) continues to develop at its current dizzying rate, the singularity could come about in the middle of the present century. Murray Shanahan offers an introduction to the idea of the singularity and considers the ramifications of such a potentially seismic event. Shanahan's aim is not to make predictions but rather to investigate a range of scenarios. Whether we believe that singularity is near or far, likely or impossible, apocalypse or utopia, the very idea raises crucial philosophical and pragmatic questions, forcing us to think seriously about what we want as a species. Shanahan describes technological advances in AI, both biologically inspired and engineered from scratch. Once human-level AI -- theoretically possible, but difficult to accomplish -- has been achieved, he explains, the transition to superintelligent AI could be very rapid. Shanahan considers what the existence of superintelligent machines could mean for such matters as personhood, responsibility, rights, and identity. Some superhuman AI agents might be created to benefit humankind; some might go rogue. (Is Siri the template, or HAL?) The singularity presents both an existential threat to humanity and an existential opportunity for humanity to transcend its limitations. Shanahan makes it clear that we need to imagine both possibilities if we want to bring about the better outcome.

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The Internet of Things: The MIT Press Essential Knowledge Series Audiobook

The Internet of Things: The MIT Press Essential Knowledge Series

Author: Samuel Greengard Narrator: Derek Shetterly Release Date: May 2015

We turn on the lights in our house from a desk in an office miles away. Our refrigerator alerts us to buy milk on the way home. A package of cookies on the supermarket shelf suggests that we buy it, based on past purchases. The cookies themselves are on the shelf because of a "smart" supply chain. When we get home, the thermostat has already adjusted the temperature so that it's toasty or bracing, whichever we prefer. This is the Internet of Things -- a networked world of connected devices, objects, and people. In this book, Samuel Greengard offers a guided tour through this emerging world and how it will change the way we live and work. Greengard explains that the Internet of Things (IoT) is still in its early stages. Smart phones, cloud computing, RFID (radio-frequency identification) technology, sensors, and miniaturization are converging to make possible a new generation of embedded and immersive technology. Greengard traces the origins of the IoT from the early days of personal computers and the Internet and examines how it creates the conceptual and practical framework for a connected world. He explores the industrial Internet and machine-to-machine communication, the basis for smart manufacturing and end-to-end supply chain visibility; the growing array of smart consumer devices and services -- from Fitbit fitness wristbands to mobile apps for banking; the practical and technical challenges of building the IoT; and the risks of a connected world, including a widening digital divide and threats to privacy and security. Finally, he considers the long-term impact of the IoT on society, narrating an eye-opening "Day in the Life" of IoT connections circa 2025.

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Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Capture Your Data and Control Your World Audiobook

Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Capture Your Data and Control Your World

Author: Bruce Schneier Narrator: Dan John Miller Release Date: March 2015

Data is everywhere. We create it every time we go online, turn our phone in (or off), and pay with a credit card. The data is stored, studied, and bought and sold by corporations and governments for surveillance and for control. “Foremost security expert” (Wired) and best-selling author Bruce Schneier shows how this data has led to a double-edged internet – a Web that gives power that gives power to the people but is abused by the institutions on which those people depend. In DATA AND GOLIATH, Schneier reveals the full extent of surveillance, censorship, and propaganda in society today, examining the risks of cybercrime, cyberterrorism, and cyberwar. He shares technological, legal, and social solutions that can help shape a more equal, private, and secure world. This is a book everyone with an internet connection – or bank account, or smart device, or car, for that matter – needs to read.

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Future Crimes: Everything Is Connected, Everyone Is Vulnerable and What We Can Do About It Audiobook

Future Crimes: Everything Is Connected, Everyone Is Vulnerable and What We Can Do About It

Author: Marc Goodman Narrator: Marc Goodman, Robertson Dean Release Date: February 2015

One of the world’s leading authorities on global security, Marc Goodman takes readers deep into the digital underground to expose the alarming ways criminals, corporations, and even countries are using new and emerging technologies against you—and how this makes everyone more vulnerable than ever imagined. Technological advances have benefited our world in immeasurable ways, but there is an ominous flip side: our technology can be turned against us. Hackers can activate baby monitors to spy on families, thieves are analyzing social media posts to plot home invasions, and stalkers are exploiting the GPS on smart phones to track their victims’ every move. We all know today’s criminals can steal identities, drain online bank accounts, and wipe out computer servers, but that’s just the beginning. To date, no computer has been created that could not be hacked—a sobering fact given our radical dependence on these machines for everything from our nation’s power grid to air traffic control to financial services. Yet, as ubiquitous as technology seems today, just over the horizon is a tidal wave of scientific progress that will leave our heads spinning. If today’s Internet is the size of a golf ball, tomorrow’s will be the size of the sun. Welcome to the Internet of Things, a living, breathing, global information grid where every physical object will be online. But with greater connections come greater risks. Implantable medical devices such as pacemakers can be hacked to deliver a lethal jolt of electricity and a car’s brakes can be disabled at high speed from miles away. Meanwhile, 3-D printers can produce AK-47s, bioterrorists can download the recipe for Spanish flu, and cartels are using fleets of drones to ferry drugs across borders. With explosive insights based upon a career in law enforcement and counterterrorism, Marc Goodman takes readers on a vivid journey through the darkest recesses of the Internet. Reading like science fiction, but based in science fact, Future Crimes explores how bad actors are primed to hijack the technologies of tomorrow, including robotics, synthetic biology, nanotechnology, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence. These fields hold the power to create a world of unprecedented abundance and prosperity. But the technological bedrock upon which we are building our common future is deeply unstable and, like a house of cards, can come crashing down at any moment. Future Crimes provides a mind-blowing glimpse into the dark side of technological innovation and the unintended consequences of our connected world. Goodman offers a way out with clear steps we must take to survive the progress unfolding before us. Provocative, thrilling, and ultimately empowering, Future Crimes will serve as an urgent call to action that shows how we can take back control over our own devices and harness technology’s tremendous power for the betterment of humanity—before it’s too late.

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Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the World's First Digital Weapon Audiobook

Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the World's First Digital Weapon

Author: Kim Zetter Narrator: Joe Ochman Release Date: November 2014

Top cybersecurity journalist Kim Zetter tells the story behind the virus that sabotaged Iran’s nuclear efforts and shows how its existence has ushered in a new age of warfare—one in which a digital attack can have the same destructive capability as a megaton bomb. In January 2010, inspectors with the International Atomic Energy Agency noticed that centrifuges at an Iranian uranium enrichment plant were failing at an unprecedented rate. The cause was a complete mystery—apparently as much to the technicians replacing the centrifuges as to the inspectors observing them. Then, five months later, a seemingly unrelated event occurred: A computer security firm in Belarus was called in to troubleshoot some computers in Iran that were crashing and rebooting repeatedly. At first, the firm’s programmers believed the malicious code on the machines was a simple, routine piece of malware. But as they and other experts around the world investigated, they discovered a mysterious virus of unparalleled complexity. They had, they soon learned, stumbled upon the world’s first digital weapon. For Stuxnet, as it came to be known, was unlike any other virus or worm built before: Rather than simply hijacking targeted computers or stealing information from them, it escaped the digital realm to wreak actual, physical destruction on a nuclear facility. In these pages, Wired journalist Kim Zetter draws on her extensive sources and expertise to tell the story behind Stuxnet’s planning, execution, and discovery, covering its genesis in the corridors of Bush’s White House and its unleashing on systems in Iran—and telling the spectacular, unlikely tale of the security geeks who managed to unravel a sabotage campaign years in the making. But Countdown to Zero Day ranges far beyond Stuxnet itself. Here, Zetter shows us how digital warfare developed in the US. She takes us inside today’s flourishing zero-day “grey markets,” in which intelligence agencies and militaries pay huge sums for the malicious code they need to carry out infiltrations and attacks. She reveals just how vulnerable many of our own critical systems are to Stuxnet-like strikes, from nation-state adversaries and anonymous hackers alike—and shows us just what might happen should our infrastructure be targeted by such an attack. Propelled by Zetter’s unique knowledge and access, and filled with eye-opening explanations of the technologies involved, Countdown to Zero Day is a comprehensive and prescient portrait of a world at the edge of a new kind of war.

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@War: The Rise of the Military-Internet Complex Audiobook

@War: The Rise of the Military-Internet Complex

Author: Shane Harris Narrator: Stephen R. Thorne Release Date: November 2014

A surprising, page-turning account of how the wars of the future are already being fought today The United States military currently views cyberspace as the “fifth domain” of warfare—alongside land, sea, air, and space—and the Department of Defense, National Security Agency, and CIA all field teams of hackers who can—and do—launch computer virus strikes against enemy targets. In fact, as @War shows, US hackers were crucial to our victory in Iraq. Shane Harris delves into the front lines of America’s new cyberwar. As recent revelations have shown, government agencies are joining with tech giants like Google and Facebook to collect vast amounts of information. The military has also formed a new alliance with tech and finance companies to patrol cyberspace, and Harris offers a deeper glimpse into this partnership than we have ever seen before. Finally, Harris explains what the new cybersecurity regime means for all of us who spend our daily lives bound to the Internet—and are vulnerable to its dangers. “Readers will squirm as they learn how every communications enterprise cooperates with the national security establishment. Harris delivers a convincing account of the terrible cyberdisasters that loom and the intrusive nature of the fight to prevent them.”—Publishers Weekly

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More Awesome Than Money: Four Boys and Their Heroic Quest to Save Your Privacy from Facebook Audiobook

More Awesome Than Money: Four Boys and Their Heroic Quest to Save Your Privacy from Facebook

Author: Jim Dwyer Narrator: Pete Larkin Release Date: October 2014

Their idea was simple. Four NYU undergrads wanted to build a social network that would allow users to control their personal data instead of surrendering it to big businesses like Facebook. They called it Diaspora. In days they raised $200,000, and reporters, venture capitalists, and the digital community's most legendary figures were soon monitoring their progress. Max dreamed of being a CEO. Ilya was the idealist. Dan coded like a pro. And Rafi tried to keep them all on track. But as the months passed and the money ran out, the Diaspora Four fell victim to errors, bad decisions, and their own hubris. In November 2011, Ilya committed suicide. Diaspora has been tech news since day one, but the story reaches far beyond Silicon Valley to the now urgent issues about the future of the Internet. With the cooperation of the surviving partners, New York Times bestselling author Jim Dwyer tells a riveting story of four ambitious and naive young men who tried to rebottle the genie of personal privacy—and paid the ultimate price.

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Dark Pools: The rise of A.I. trading machines and the looming threat to Wall Street Audiobook

Dark Pools: The rise of A.I. trading machines and the looming threat to Wall Street

Author: Scott Patterson Narrator: Byron Wagner Release Date: October 2014

Dark Pools is the pacy, revealing, and profoundly chilling tale of how global markets have been hijacked by trading robots - many so self-directed that humans can't predict what they'll do next.It's the story of the blisteringly intelligent computer programmers behind the rise of these 'bots'. And it's a timely warning that as artificial intelligence gradually takes over, we could be on the verge of global meltdown. 'Scott Patterson has the ability to see things you and I don't notice.' Nassim Nicholas Taleb, New York Times bestselling author of Antifragile, Fooled by Randomness and The Black Swan

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Virtually Human Audiobook

Virtually Human

Author: Martine Rothblatt Narrator: Jeff Cummings, Laural Merlington Release Date: September 2014

Every day, social media is automatically uploading our thoughts, memories, preferences, beliefs, and history to a virtual existence, essentially creating a “mindfile” of users. From this mindfile, thousands of software engineers across the globe are working on “mindware” to create personalities and humanlike consciousness in computer software—or cyberconsciousness. In the next decade or two, these efforts will result in the first digital copies of our identities, which will be our “mindclones.” As we communicate with our own mindclones, and as they and we interact with mindclones of other people, even those whose bodies have died, these cyberconscious beings will become part of the fabric of our daily lives and routines. In Virtually Human, author Martine Rothblatt shares her insights into how cyberconsciousness will manifest in our lives and what we need to consider when a new, high-tech population of mindclones awakens to the rights, privileges, and obligations humans take for granted. With her passion, commitment, and continued financial investment in this emerging technology, she is poised to be a leader in the paradigm shift already under way. Virtually Human conveys in clear, positive language a profound understanding of how close we are to achieving a full simulation of the human brain via software and computer technology. It raises numerous ethical and moral questions we absolutely need to address now, before the technology becomes commercially viable and accessible to all of us. Rothblatt launches an urgent investigation into what we will all face over the coming decades as our relationship with our virtual selves evolves and deepens. She gives us the philosophical and technological tools to understand the far-reaching implications of artificial intelligence. Martine Rothblatt has been at the forefront of AI research and is a clearheaded—and optimistic—thinker when it comes to understanding the ethical concerns that will play a significant role as we move toward living side by side with our mindclones. Virtually Human will be the essential companion audiobook to the future of mankind.

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Cloud Surfing: A New Way to Think About Risk, Innovation, Scale, and Success Audiobook

Cloud Surfing: A New Way to Think About Risk, Innovation, Scale, and Success

Author: Tom Koulopoulos Narrator: Tom Koulopoulos Release Date: August 2014

When people hear "the Cloud," they think of cloud computing, just a sliver of what the Cloud is today. The Cloud has grown: it represents the consummate disruptor to structure; a pervasive social and economic network that will soon connect and define more of the world than any other political, social, or economic organization. The Cloud is the first megatrend of the twenty-first century, one that will shape the way we will address virtually every challenge we face for at least the next 100 years. It is where we will all live, work, and play in the coming decades. The Cloud is where your kids go to dive into online play. It's where you meet and make friends in social networks. It's where companies find the next big idea. It's where political campaigns are won and lost. Cloud Surfing is the groundbreaking book that will explain how to access the full value of the Cloud and how to embrace its possibilities.

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The Filter Bubble: What the Internet Is Hiding from You Audiobook

The Filter Bubble: What the Internet Is Hiding from You

Author: Eli Pariser Narrator: Kirby Heyborne Release Date: May 2014

In December 2009, Google began customizing its search results for each user. Instead of giving you the most broadly popular result, Google now tries to predict what you are most likely to click on. According to MoveOn.org board president Eli Pariser, Google's change in policy is symptomatic of the most significant shift to take place on the Web in recent years—the rise of personalization. In this groundbreaking investigation of the new hidden Web, Pariser uncovers how this growing trend threatens to control how we consume and share information as a society—and reveals what we can do about it. Though the phenomenon has gone largely undetected until now, personalized filters are sweeping the Web, creating individual universes of information for each of us. Facebook—the primary news source for an increasing number of Americans—prioritizes the links it believes will appeal to you so that if you are a liberal, you can expect to see only progressive links. Even an old-media bastion like The Washington Post devotes the top of its home page to a news feed with the links your Facebook friends are sharing. Behind the scenes, a burgeoning industry of data companies is tracking your personal information to sell to advertisers, from your political leanings to the color you painted your living room to the hiking boots you just browsed on Zappos. In a personalized world, we will increasingly be typed and fed only news that is pleasant, familiar, and confirms our beliefs—and because these filters are invisible, we won't know what is being hidden from us. Our past interests will determine what we are exposed to in the future, leaving less room for the unexpected encounters that spark creativity, innovation, and the democratic exchange of ideas. While we all worry that the Internet is eroding privacy or shrinking our attention spans, Pariser uncovers a more pernicious and far-reaching trend and shows how we can—and must—change course. With vivid detail and remarkable scope, The Filter Bubble reveals how personalization undermines the Internet's original purpose as an open platform for the spread of ideas and could leave us all in an isolated, echoing world.

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Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other Audiobook

Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other

Author: Sherry Turkle Narrator: Laural Merlington Release Date: April 2014

Consider Facebook—it's human contact, only easier to engage with and easier to avoid. Developing technology promises closeness. Sometimes it delivers, but much of our modern life leaves us less connected with people and more connected to simulations of them. In Alone Together, MIT technology and society professor Sherry Turkle explores the power of our new tools and toys to dramatically alter our social lives. It's a nuanced exploration of what we are looking for—and sacrificing—in a world of electronic companions and social networking tools, and an argument that, despite the hand-waving of today's self-described prophets of the future, it will be the next generation who will chart the path between isolation and connectivity.

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