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Audiobooks Narrated by Peter Marinker

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LoveReading Top 10

  1. Miss Austen: One of the best novels of 2020 according to the Times, Mail, Observer, Stylist and more Audiobook Miss Austen: One of the best novels of 2020 according to the Times, Mail, Observer, Stylist and more
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  2. Cleanness Audiobook Cleanness
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  3. Don't Hold My Head Down Audiobook Don't Hold My Head Down
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  4. You're Not Listening: What You're Missing and Why It Matters Audiobook You're Not Listening: What You're Missing and Why It Matters
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  5. The Hopes and Triumphs of the Amir Sisters Audiobook The Hopes and Triumphs of the Amir Sisters
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  6. The Other People Audiobook The Other People
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  7. Surrounded by Idiots: The Four Types of Human Behaviour (or, How to Understand Those Who Cannot Be U Audiobook Surrounded by Idiots: The Four Types of Human Behaviour (or, How to Understand Those Who Cannot Be U
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  8. Mr Nobody Audiobook Mr Nobody
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  9. Love Her or Lose Her: A Novel Audiobook Love Her or Lose Her: A Novel
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  10. The Bear and The Nightingale: (Winternight Trilogy) Audiobook The Bear and The Nightingale: (Winternight Trilogy)
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On Rumours: How Falsehoods Spread, Why We Believe Them, What Can Be Done Audiobook

On Rumours: How Falsehoods Spread, Why We Believe Them, What Can Be Done

Author: Cass R. Sunstein Narrator: Peter Marinker Release Date: December 2019

Rumours are as old as human history, but with the rise of the internet it's now possible to spread stories about anyone, anywhere, instantly. In the 2008 US election many Americans believed Barack Obama was a Muslim. The conspiracy theory book 9/11: The Big Lie has become a bestseller. Hearsay has fuelled economic boom and bust - so much so that in many places it's now a crime to circulate false rumours about banks. Why do ordinary people accept rumours, even untrue, bizarre or damaging ones? Does it matter? And, if so, what should we do about it? As Cass Sunstein shows in his brilliant analysis of the phenomenon, there are many different ways in which rumours are dispersed. He reveals how some people have pre-exisiting prejudices that make them particularly susceptible to certain falsehoods, but also why all of us (even the most sceptical) have a tipping point at which we will come to accept a rumour as true. He looks at why some groups, even different nations, believe different things (for example, many Germans think that drinking water after eating cherries is deadly), and he shows why some rumours spread faster than others. Even if we don't realize it, the most open-minded among us are subject to extraordinary biases. This groundbreaking book will make us think harder about the information we are given, and could help us move towards a more open-minded and fair culture. "Compelling...full of insights." GUARDIAN 'More than just a book: It's a manifesto.' PROSPECT

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How Change Happens Audiobook

How Change Happens

Author: Cass R. Sunstein Narrator: Peter Marinker Release Date: November 2019

The different ways that social change happens, from unleashing to nudging to social cascades. How does social change happen? When do social movements take off? Sexual harassment was once something that women had to endure; now a movement has risen up against it. White nationalist sentiments, on the other hand, were largely kept out of mainstream discourse; now there is no shortage of media outlets for them. In this book, with the help of behavioral economics, psychology, and other fields, Cass Sunstein casts a bright new light on how change happens. Sunstein focuses on the crucial role of social norms-and on their frequent collapse. When norms lead people to silence themselves, even an unpopular status quo can persist. Then one day, someone challenges the norm-a child who exclaims that the emperor has no clothes; a woman who says 'me too.' Sometimes suppressed outrage is unleashed, and long-standing practices fall. Sometimes change is more gradual, as 'nudges' help produce new and different decisions-apps that count calories; texted reminders of deadlines; automatic enrollment in green energy or pension plans. Sunstein explores what kinds of nudges are effective and shows why nudges sometimes give way to bans and mandates. Finally, he considers social divisions, social cascades, and 'partyism,' when identification with a political party creates a strong bias against all members of an opposing party-which can both fuel and block social change. 'Sunstein's book is illuminating because it puts norms at the center of how we think about change.' DAVID BROOKS, The New York Times

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The Cost-Benefit Revolution Audiobook

The Cost-Benefit Revolution

Author: Cass R. Sunstein Narrator: Peter Marinker Release Date: November 2019

Why policies should be based on careful consideration of their costs and benefits rather than on intuition, popular opinion, interest groups, and anecdotes. Opinions on government policies vary widely. Some people feel passionately about the child obesity epidemic and support government regulation of sugary drinks. Others argue that people should be able to eat and drink whatever they like. Some people are alarmed about climate change and favor aggressive government intervention. Others don't feel the need for any sort of climate regulation. In The Cost-Benefit Revolution, Cass Sunstein argues our major disagreements really involve facts, not values. It follows that government policy should not be based on public opinion, intuitions, or pressure from interest groups, but on numbers-meaning careful consideration of costs and benefits. Will a policy save one life, or one thousand lives? Will it impose costs on consumers, and if so, will the costs be high or negligible? Will it hurt workers and small businesses, and, if so, precisely how much? As the Obama administration's 'regulatory czar,' Sunstein knows his subject in both theory and practice. Drawing on behavioral economics and his well-known emphasis on 'nudging,' he celebrates the cost-benefit revolution in policy making, tracing its defining moments in the Reagan, Clinton, and Obama administrations (and pondering its uncertain future in the Trump administration). He acknowledges that public officials often lack information about costs and benefits, and outlines state-of-the-art techniques for acquiring that information. Policies should make people's lives better. Quantitative cost-benefit analysis, Sunstein argues, is the best available method for making this happen-even if, in the future, new measures of human well-being, also explored in this book, may be better still.

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Constitutional Personae: Heroes, Soldiers, Minimalists, and Mutes (Inalienable Rights) Audiobook

Constitutional Personae: Heroes, Soldiers, Minimalists, and Mutes (Inalienable Rights)

Author: Cass R. Sunstein Narrator: Peter Marinker Release Date: November 2019

Since America's founding, the U.S. Supreme Court had issued a vast number of decisions on a staggeringly wide variety of subjects. And hundreds of judges have occupied the bench. Yet as Cass R. Sunstein, the eminent legal scholar and bestselling co-author of Nudge, points out, almost every one of the Justices fits into a very small number of types regardless of ideology: the hero, the soldier, the minimalist, and the mute. Heroes are willing to invoke the Constitution to invalidate state laws, federal legislation, and prior Court decisions. They loudly embrace first principles and are prone to flair, employing dramatic language to fundamentally reshape the law. Soldiers, on the other hand, are skeptical of judicial power, and typically defer to decisions made by the political branches. Minimalists favor small steps and only incremental change. They worry that bold reversals of long-established traditions may be counterproductive, producing a backlash that only leads to another reversal. Mutes would rather say nothing at all about the big constitutional issues, and instead tend to decide cases on narrow grounds or keep controversial cases out of the Court altogether by denying standing. As Sunstein shows, many of the most important constitutional debates are in fact contests between the four Personae. Whether the issue involves slavery, gender equality, same-sex marriage, executive power, surveillance, or freedom of speech, debates have turned on choices made among the four Personae?choices that derive as much from psychology as constitutional theory. Sunstein himself defends a form of minimalism, arguing that it is the best approach in a self-governing society of free people. More broadly, he casts a genuinely novel light on longstanding disputes over the proper way to interpret the constitution, demonstrating that behind virtually every decision and beneath all of the abstract theory lurk the four Personae. By emphasizing the centrality of character types, Sunstein forces us to rethink everything we know about how the Supreme Court works. 'Cass Sunstein provides an enlightening look at the different ways to approach the Constitution. In doing so, he transcends ideology and helps us appreciate different perspectives. He also shows the virtue of his own favorite approach, that of minimalism, which seeks to respect traditions and long-settled practices.' -Walter Isaacson, President and CEO of the Aspen Institute, and author of The Innovators 'In this remarkable addition to Oxford University Press' 'Inalienable Rights' series on the American Constitution, Cass Sunstein persuasively speaks not to theories of constitutional interpretation, but to four archetypical judicial personalities reflected in opinion-writing, and in doing so he opens up an imaginative new perspective for appreciating our constitutional history.' -Peter L. Strauss, Betts Professor of Law, Columbia Law School 'In Constitutional Personae, Cass Sunstein analyzes judicial review in the United States in terms of four personalities or archetypes. He shows how this model illuminates a wide range of questions, and he offers a subtle restatement and defense of his favorite persona, the constitutional minimalist. Filled to the brim with insights, this is a splendid and imaginative contribution to constitutional theory.' -Jack Balkin, Knight Professor of Constitutional Law, Yale Law School 'A novel approach...carefully reasoned and clearly explained, Sunstein's approach offers a more insightful way of analyzing the positions of individual justices than resorting to simplistic ideologies.' - Kirkus Reviews '[A] valuable study of the different approaches that Supreme Court justices take in deciding cases...Given the significance of recent Supreme Court decisions on such issues as campaign finance, health care coverage, and marriage equality, Sunstein has performed a public service by enabling a better comprehension of how these judgments are reached.' -Publishers Weekly 'Constitutional Personae has all sorts of treasures in it. Its classifications are illuminating.' - The New York Review of Books

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Choosing Not to Choose: Understanding the Value of Choice Audiobook

Choosing Not to Choose: Understanding the Value of Choice

Author: Cass R. Sunstein Narrator: Peter Marinker Release Date: November 2019

Our ability to make choices is fundamental to our sense of ourselves as human beings, and essential to the political values of freedom-protecting nations. Whom we love; where we work; how we spend our time; what we buy; such choices define us in the eyes of ourselves and others, and much blood and ink has been spilt to establish and protect our rights to make them freely. Choice can also be a burden. Our cognitive capacity to research and make the best decisions is limited, so every active choice comes at a cost. In modern life the requirement to make active choices can often be overwhelming. So, across broad areas of our lives, from health plans to energy suppliers, many of us choose not to choose. By following our default options, we save ourselves the costs of making active choices. By setting those options, governments and corporations dictate the outcomes for when we decide by default. This is among the most significant ways in which they effect social change, yet we are just beginning to understand the power and impact of default rules. Many central questions remain unanswered: When should governments set such defaults, and when should they insist on active choices? How should such defaults be made? What makes some defaults successful while others fail? Cass R. Sunstein has long been at the forefront of developing public policy and regulation to use government power to encourage people to make better decisions. In this major new book, Choosing Not to Choose, he presents his most complete argument yet for how we should understand the value of choice, and when and how we should enable people to choose not to choose. The onset of big data gives corporations and governments the power to make ever more sophisticated decisions on our behalf, defaulting us to buy the goods we predictably want, or vote for the parties and policies we predictably support. As consumers we are starting to embrace the benefits this can bring. But should we? What will be the long-term effects of limiting our active choices on our agency? And can such personalized defaults be imported from the marketplace to politics and the law? Confronting the challenging future of data-driven decision-making, Sunstein presents a manifesto for how personalized defaults should be used to enhance, rather than restrict, our freedom and well-being.

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Why Nudge?: The Politics of Libertarian Paternalism Audiobook

Why Nudge?: The Politics of Libertarian Paternalism

Author: Cass R. Sunstein Narrator: Peter Marinker Release Date: November 2019

The bestselling author of Simpler offers a powerful, provocative, and convincing argument for protecting people from their own mistakes Based on a series of pathbreaking lectures given at Yale University in 2012, this powerful, thought-provoking work by national best-selling author Cass R. Sunstein combines legal theory with behavioral economics to make a fresh argument about the legitimate scope of government, bearing on obesity, smoking, distracted driving, health care, food safety, and other highly volatile, high-profile public issues. Behavioral economists have established that people often make decisions that run counter to their best interests-producing what Sunstein describes as 'behavioral market failures.' Sometimes we disregard the long term; sometimes we are unrealistically optimistic; sometimes we do not see what is in front of us. With this evidence in mind, Sunstein argues for a new form of paternalism, one that protects people against serious errors but also recognizes the risk of government overreaching and usually preserves freedom of choice. Against those who reject paternalism of any kind, Sunstein shows that 'choice architecture'-government-imposed structures that affect our choices-is inevitable, and hence that a form of paternalism cannot be avoided. He urges that there are profoundly moral reasons to ensure that choice architecture is helpful rather than harmful-and that it makes people's lives better and longer.

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Redemption Falls Audiobook

Redemption Falls

Author: Joseph O'Connor Narrator: Peter Marinker Release Date: May 2015

1865: The American Civil War is ending. Eighteen years after the famine ship 'Star of the Sea' docked at New York, the daughter of two of its passengers sets out from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Eliza Duane Mooney is searching for her younger brother who she has not seen in four years. It's a walk that will have consequences for many...

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Star of the Sea Audiobook

Star of the Sea

Author: Joseph O'Connor Narrator: Peter Marinker Release Date: May 2015

In the bitter winter of 1847, from an Ireland torn by injustice and natural disaster, the Star of the Sea sets sail for New York. On board are hundreds of fleeing refugees, all braving the Atlantic in search of a new home. But a camouflaged killer is stalking the decks, hungry for the vengeance that will bring absolution. The twenty-six day journey will see many lives end, whilst others begin afresh...

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Fugitive Pieces Audiobook

Fugitive Pieces

Author: Anne Michaels Narrator: Peter Marinker Release Date: December 2013

In 1940 a boy bursts from the mud of a war-torn Polish city, where he has buried himself to hide from the soldiers who murdered his family. His name is Jakob Beer. He is only seven years old. And although by all rights he should have shared the fate of the other Jews in his village, he has not only survived but been rescued by a Greek geologist, who does not recognize the boy as human until he begins to cry. With this electrifying image, Anne Michaels ushers us into her rapturously acclaimed novel of loss, memory, history, and redemption. As Michaels follows Jakob across two continents, she lets us witness his transformation from a half-wild casualty of the Holocaust to an artist who extracts meaning from its abyss. Filled with mysterious symmetries and rendered in heart-stopping prose, Fugitive Pieces is a triumphant work, a book that should not so much be read as it should be surrendered to. “Extraordinarily magical.”—New York Times

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The Black Russian Audiobook

The Black Russian

Author: Vladimir Alexandrov Narrator: Peter Marinker Release Date: August 2013

The Black Russian is the incredible story of Frederick Bruce Thomas, born in 1872 to former slaves who became prosperous farmers in Mississippi. A rich white planter’s attempt to steal their land forced them to flee to Memphis, where Frederick’s father was brutally murdered. After leaving the South and working as a waiter and valet in Chicago and Brooklyn, Frederick sought greater freedom in London, then crisscrossed Europe, and—in a highly unusual choice for a black American at the time—went to Russia in 1899. Because he found no color line there, Frederick made Moscow his home. He renamed himself Fyodor Fyodorovich Tomas, married twice, acquired a mistress, and took Russian citizenship. Through his hard work, charm, and guile he became one of the city’s richest and most famous owners of variety theaters and restaurants. But the Bolshevik Revolution ruined him, and he barely escaped with his life and family to Constantinople in 1919. Starting from scratch, he made a second fortune by opening celebrated nightclubs that introduced jazz to Turkey. However, the long arm of American racism, the xenophobia of the new Turkish Republic, and Frederick’s own extravagance landed him in debtors’ prison. He died in Constantinople in 1928.rnrn“A spirited tale of boundary-crossing and history-bucking, every bit as colorful as it seems improbable.”—Stacy Schiff, Pulitzer Prize–winning authorrnrn

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The Examined Life: How We Lose and Find Ourselves Audiobook

The Examined Life: How We Lose and Find Ourselves

Author: Stephen Grosz Narrator: Peter Marinker Release Date: May 2013

An extraordinary book for anyone eager to understand the hidden motives that shape our lives We are all storytellers—we create stories to make sense of our lives. But it is not enough to tell tales; there must be someone to listen. In his work as a practicing psychoanalyst, Stephen Grosz has spent the last twenty-five years uncovering the hidden feelings behind our most baffling behavior. The Examined Life distills more than fifty thousand hours of conversation into pure psychological insight without the jargon. This extraordinary book is about one ordinary process: talking, listening, and understanding. Its aphoristic and elegant stories teach us a new kind of attentiveness. They also unveil a delicate self-portrait of the analyst at work and show how lessons learned in the consulting room can reveal as much to the analyst as to the patient. These are stories about our everyday lives; they are about the people we love and the lies we tell, the changes we bear and the grief. Ultimately, they show us not only how we lose ourselves but also how we might find ourselves. “This book conveys the nuanced complexities of psychoanalysis in deceptively simple human stories. It is written with generosity toward both its subjects and its readers, with authentic wit, and with flashes of profound insight. The novelistic charm of its case histories makes it impossible to put down, but while you may read it for entertainment, it will leave you wiser about humanity than you were when you picked it up.”—Andrew Solomon, National Book Award–winning author of Far from the Tree

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Tony and Susan Audiobook

Tony and Susan

Author: Austin Wright Narrator: Lorelei King, Peter Marinker Release Date: August 2011

Fifteen years ago, Susan Morrow left her first husband Edward Sheffield, an unpublished writer. Now, she's enduring middle class suburbia as a doctor's wife, when out of the blue she receives a package containing the manuscript of her ex-husband's first novel. He writes asking her to read the book; she was always his best critic, he says. As Susan reads, she is drawn into the fictional life of Tony Hastings, a math professor driving his family to their summer house in Maine. And as we listen, we too become lost in Sheffield's thriller. As the Hastings' ordinary, civilized lives are disastrously, violently sent off course, Susan is plunged back into the past, forced to confront the darkness that inhabits her, and driven to name the fear that gnaws at her future and will change her life.

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