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Audiobooks Narrated by William Andrew Quinn

Browse audiobooks narrated by William Andrew Quinn, listen to samples and when you're ready head over to Audiobooks.com where you can get 3 FREE audiobooks on us

LoveReading Top 10

  1. The Final Twist Audiobook The Final Twist
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  2. The Bomber Mafia: A Dream, a Temptation, and the Longest Night of the Second World War Audiobook The Bomber Mafia: A Dream, a Temptation, and the Longest Night of the Second World War
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  3. Soundtracks: The Surprising Solution to Overthinking Audiobook Soundtracks: The Surprising Solution to Overthinking
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  4. Win at Work and Succeed at Life: 5 Principles to Free Yourself from the Cult of Overwork Audiobook Win at Work and Succeed at Life: 5 Principles to Free Yourself from the Cult of Overwork
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  5. Left You Dead Audiobook Left You Dead
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  6. Protector: The epic new adventure through the battlefields of ancient Greece Audiobook Protector: The epic new adventure through the battlefields of ancient Greece
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  7. Because of You: The instant Sunday Times bestseller 2020 Audiobook Because of You: The instant Sunday Times bestseller 2020
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  8. The Wife Who Got a Life Audiobook The Wife Who Got a Life
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  9. Covet Audiobook Covet
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  10. The Power of Geography: Ten Maps That Reveal the Future of Our World Audiobook The Power of Geography: Ten Maps That Reveal the Future of Our World
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Africans and Native Americans: The Language of Race and the Evolution of Red-Black Peoples Audiobook

Africans and Native Americans: The Language of Race and the Evolution of Red-Black Peoples

Author: Jack D. Forbes Narrator: William Andrew Quinn Release Date: May 2021

This volume will revise the way we look at the modern populations of Latin America and North America by providing a totally new view of the history of Native American and African American peoples throughout the hemisphere. Africans and Native Americans explores key issues relating to the evolution of racial terminology and European colonialists' perceptions of color, analyzing the development of color classification systems and the specific evolution of key terms such as black, mulatto, and mestizo, which no longer carry their original meanings. Jack Forbes presents strong evidence that Native American and African contacts began in Europe, Africa, and the Caribbean and that Native Americans may have crossed the Atlantic long before Columbus.

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Capitalism and Slavery: Third Edition Audiobook

Capitalism and Slavery: Third Edition

Author: Eric Williams Narrator: William Andrew Quinn Release Date: April 2021

Slavery helped finance the Industrial Revolution in England. Plantation owners, shipbuilders, and merchants connected with the slave trade accumulated vast fortunes that established banks and heavy industry in Europe and expanded the reach of capitalism worldwide. Eric Williams advanced these powerful ideas in Capitalism and Slavery, published in 1944. Years ahead of its time, his profound critique became the foundation for studies of imperialism and economic development. Binding an economic view of history with strong moral argument, Williams's study of the role of slavery in financing the Industrial Revolution refuted traditional ideas of economic and moral progress and firmly established the centrality of the African slave trade in European economic development. He also showed that mature industrial capitalism in turn helped destroy the slave system. Establishing the exploitation of commercial capitalism and its link to racial attitudes, Williams employed a historicist vision that set the tone for future studies. William A. Darity Jr.'s new foreword highlights Williams's insights for a new generation, and Colin Palmer's introduction assesses the lasting impact of Williams's groundbreaking work and analyzes the heated scholarly debates it generated when it first appeared.

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The Education of Blacks in the South, 1860-1935 Audiobook

The Education of Blacks in the South, 1860-1935

Author: James D. Anderson Narrator: William Andrew Quinn Release Date: March 2021

James Anderson critically reinterprets the history of southern black education from Reconstruction to the Great Depression. By placing black schooling within a political, cultural, and economic context, he offers fresh insights into black commitment to education, the peculiar significance of Tuskegee Institute, and the conflicting goals of various philanthropic groups, among other matters. Initially, ex-slaves attempted to create an educational system that would support and extend their emancipation, but their children were pushed into a system of industrial education that presupposed black political and economic subordination. This conception of education and social order-supported by northern industrial philanthropists, some black educators, and most southern school officials-conflicted with the aspirations of ex-slaves and their descendants, resulting at the turn of the century in a bitter national debate over the purposes of black education. Because blacks lacked economic and political power, white elites were able to control the structure and content of black elementary, secondary, normal, and college education during the first third of the twentieth century. Nonetheless, blacks persisted in their struggle to develop an educational system in accordance with their own needs and desires.

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Nothing to Lose: Unlikely Allies in the Struggle for a Better Black America Audiobook

Nothing to Lose: Unlikely Allies in the Struggle for a Better Black America

Author: Pastor Darrell Scott Narrator: William Andrew Quinn Release Date: March 2021

Pastor Darrell Scott demolishes entrenched stereotypes and political boundaries with his candid, revealing, and often surprising story: how a devout Christian and African American has become one of President Donald Trump's leading supporters and advisors. 'What makes you think black people will vote for you? Because the word on the street is, you're a racist.' With those blunt words to then-presidential candidate Donald Trump, Pastor Darrell Scott began a journey he never expected to take-becoming the future president's most prominent African-American supporter and advisor. In Nothing to Lose, Pastor Scott recounts how and why he boarded 'the Trump Train,' revealing the considerable difficulties he experienced along the way. As his story progresses, Pastor Scott highlights the accomplishments he, his allies, and members of the Trump administration have worked so hard to earn on behalf of the black community in the United States. Pastor Scott also provides a surprising portrait of President Donald Trump himself-his candor; his support for policies, issues, and initiatives important to the African-American community; and his little-understood relationship with Christianity.

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Unsung: Unheralded Narratives of American Slavery & Abolition Audiobook

Unsung: Unheralded Narratives of American Slavery & Abolition

A new historical anthology from transatlantic slavery to the Reconstruction curated by the Schomburg Center, that makes the case for focusing on the histories of Black people as agents and architects of their own lives and ultimate liberation, with a foreword by Kevin Young This is the first Penguin Classics anthology published in partnership with the Schomburg Center, a world-renowned cultural institution documenting black life in America and worldwide. A historic branch of NYPL located in Harlem, the Schomburg holds one of the world's premiere collections of slavery material within the Lapidus Center for Historical Analysis of Transatlantic Slavery. Unsung will place well-known documents by abolitionists alongside lesser-known life stories and overlooked or previously uncelebrated accounts of the everyday lives and activism that were central in the slavery era, but that are mostly excised from today's master accounts. Unsung will also highlight related titles from founder Arturo Schomburg's initial collection: rare histories and first-person narratives about slavery that assisted his generation in understanding the roots of their contemporary social struggles. Unsung will draw from the Schomburg's rich holdings in order to lead a dynamic discussion of slavery, rebellion, resistance, and anti-slavery protest in the United States.

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The Black Holocaust For Beginners Audiobook

The Black Holocaust For Beginners

Author: S.E. Anderson Narrator: William Andrew Quinn Release Date: February 2021

Virtually anyone, anywhere knows that six million Jewish human beings were killed in the Jewish Holocaust. But how many African human beings were killed in the Black Holocaust-from the start of the European slave trade (c. 1500) to the Civil War (1865)? And how many were enslaved? The Black Holocaust, a travesty that killed millions of African human beings, is the most underreported major event in world history. A major economic event for Europe and Asia, a near fatal event for Africa, the seminal event in the history of every African American-if not every American!-and most of us cannot answer the simplest question about it. Here is a sample of what you will get from the painstakingly researched, painfully honest The Black Holocaust For Beginners: 'The total number of slaves imported is not known. It is estimated that nearly 900,000 came to America in the 16th Century, 2.75 million in the 17th Century, 7 million in the 18th, and over 4 million in the 19th-perhaps 15 million in total. Probably every slave imported represented, on average, five corpses in Africa or on the high seas. The American slave trade, therefore, meant the elimination of at least 60 million Africans from their fatherland.'

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The Deacons for Defense: Armed Resistance and the Civil Rights Movement Audiobook

The Deacons for Defense: Armed Resistance and the Civil Rights Movement

Author: Lance Hill Narrator: William Andrew Quinn Release Date: December 2020

In 1964 a small group of African American men in Jonesboro, Louisiana, defied the nonviolence policy of the mainstream civil rights movement and formed an armed self-defense organization-the Deacons for Defense and Justice-to protect movement workers from vigilante and police violence. With their largest and most famous chapter at the center of a bloody campaign in the Ku Klux Klan stronghold of Bogalusa, Louisiana, the Deacons became a popular symbol of the growing frustration with Martin Luther King Jr.'s nonviolent strategy and a rallying point for a militant working-class movement in the South. Lance Hill offers the first detailed history of the Deacons for Defense and Justice. In his analysis of this important yet long-overlooked organization, Hill challenges what he calls 'the myth of nonviolence'-the idea that a united civil rights movement achieved its goals through nonviolent direct action led by middle-class and religious leaders. In contrast, Hill constructs a compelling historical narrative of a working-class armed self-defense movement that defied the entrenched nonviolent leadership and played a crucial role in compelling the federal government to neutralize the Klan and uphold civil rights and liberties.

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The Untold Story of Shields Green: The Life and Death of a Harper's Ferry Raider Audiobook

The Untold Story of Shields Green: The Life and Death of a Harper's Ferry Raider

Author: Louis A. Decaro Jr. Narrator: William Andrew Quinn Release Date: November 2020

Explores the life of Shields Green, one of the black men who followed John Brown to Harper's Ferry in 1859 When John Brown decided to raid the federal armory in Harper's Ferry as the starting point of his intended liberation effort in the South, some closest to him thought it was unnecessary and dangerous. Frederick Douglass, a pioneering abolitionist, refused Brown's invitation to join him in Virginia, believing that the raid on the armory was a suicide mission. Yet in front of Douglass, 'Emperor' Shields Green, a fugitive from South Carolina, accepted John Brown's invitation. When the raid failed, Emperor was captured with the rest of Brown's surviving men and hanged on December 16, 1859. 'Emperor' Shields Green was a critical member of John Brown's Harper's Ferry raiders but has long been overlooked. Louis DeCaro, Jr., a veteran scholar of John Brown, presents the first effort to tell Emperor's story based upon extensive research, restoring him to his rightful place in this fateful raid at the origin of the American Civil War. Starting from his birth in Charleston, South Carolina, Green's life as an abolitionist freedom-fighter, whose passion for the liberation of his people outweighed self-preservation, is extensively detailed in this compact history.

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The Black Romantic Revolution: Abolitionist Poets at the End of Slavery Audiobook

The Black Romantic Revolution: Abolitionist Poets at the End of Slavery

Author: Matt Sandler Narrator: William Andrew Quinn Release Date: October 2020

The prophetic poetry of slavery and its abolition During the pitched battle over slavery in the United States, Black writers-enslaved and free-allied themselves with the cause of abolition and used their art to advocate for emancipation and to envision the end of slavery as a world-historical moment of possibility. These Black writers borrowed from the European tradition of Romanticism-lyric poetry, prophetic visions-to write, speak, and sing their hopes for what freedom might mean. At the same time, they voiced anxieties about the expansion of global capital and US imperial power in the aftermath of slavery. They also focused on the ramifications of slavery's sexual violence. Authors like Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, George Moses Horton, Albery Allson Whitman, and Joshua McCarter Simpson conceived the Civil War as a revolutionary upheaval on par with Europe's stormy Age of Revolutions. The Black Romantic Revolution proposes that the Black Romantics' cultural innovations have shaped Black radical culture to this day, from the blues and hip hop to Black nationalism and Black feminism. Their expressions of love and rage, grief and determination, dreams and nightmares, still echo into our present.

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Thinking Like a Lawyer: A Framework for Teaching Critical Thinking to All Students Audiobook

Thinking Like a Lawyer: A Framework for Teaching Critical Thinking to All Students

Author: Colin Seale Narrator: William Andrew Quinn Release Date: October 2020

Critical thinking is the essential tool for ensuring that students fulfill their promise. But, in reality, critical thinking is still a luxury good, and students with the greatest potential are too often challenged the least. Thinking Like a Lawyer: - Introduces a powerful but practical framework to close the critical thinking gap. - Gives teachers the tools and knowledge to teach critical thinking to all students. - Helps students adopt the skills, habits, and mindsets of lawyers. - Empowers students to tackle twenty-first-century problems. - Teaches students how to compete in a rapidly changing global marketplace. Colin Seale, a teacher-turned-attorney-turned-education-innovator and founder of thinkLaw, uses his unique experience to introduce a wide variety of concrete instructional strategies and examples that teachers can use in all grade levels and subject areas. Individual chapters address underachievement, the value of nuance, evidence-based reasoning, social-emotional learning, equitable education, and leveraging families to close the critical thinking gap.

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The Legend of the Black Mecca: Politics and Class in the Making of Modern Atlanta Audiobook

The Legend of the Black Mecca: Politics and Class in the Making of Modern Atlanta

Author: Maurice J. Hobson Narrator: William Andrew Quinn Release Date: September 2020

For more than a century, the city of Atlanta has been associated with black achievement in education, business, politics, media, and music, earning it the nickname 'the black Mecca.' Atlanta's long tradition of black education dates back to Reconstruction, and produced an elite that flourished in spite of Jim Crow, rose to leadership during the civil rights movement, and then took power in the 1970s by building a coalition between white progressives, business interests, and black Atlantans. But as Maurice J. Hobson demonstrates, Atlanta's political leadership-from the election of Maynard Jackson, Atlanta's first black mayor, through the city's hosting of the 1996 Olympic Games-has consistently mishandled the black poor. Drawn from vivid primary sources and unnerving oral histories of working-class city-dwellers and hip-hop artists from Atlanta's underbelly, Hobson argues that Atlanta's political leadership has governed by bargaining with white business interests to the detriment of ordinary black Atlantans. In telling this history through the prism of the black New South and Atlanta politics, policy, and pop culture, Hobson portrays a striking schism between the black political elite and poor city-dwellers, complicating the long-held view of Atlanta as a mecca for black people.

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God of the Oppressed Audiobook

God of the Oppressed

Author: James H. Cone Narrator: William Andrew Quinn Release Date: September 2020

In his reflections on God, Jesus, suffering, and liberation, James H. Cone relates the gospel message to the experience of the black community. But a wider theme of the book is the role that social and historical context plays in framing the questions we address to God as well as the mode of the answers provided.

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