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Ayesha at Last

by Uzma Jalaluddin

Modern and Classic Literary Fiction Relationship Stories

LoveReading View on Ayesha at Last

Forthright, funny Ayesha harbours dreams of being a poet and occasionally performs at a literary lounge, but her ambitions are somewhat hampered by her new teaching job and familial pressure to get married, a pressure that’s intensified by her stunning younger cousin’s countless marriage proposals. But Ayesha is adamant that she doesn’t want an arranged marriage, even if it means she might be doomed to spinsterhood. Then, courtesy of her best friend and a conference at her mosque, a few twists of fate throw Ayesha into contact with hyper-critical, conservative Khalid, who dresses like a time-traveller from several centuries ago and is utterly under his wealthy mother’s control.  Cue much friction, farcical funniness and genuine soul-searching as Ayesha and Khalid embark on complex, intersecting journeys of discovery. 

Alongside serving up a sparkling love story, this debut also tackles meaty issues, from the rampant islamophobia of Khaled’s abhorrent boss, to the sexism Ayesha stands up to. Indeed, the criss-crossing sub-plots - both gritty and comic - keep the pages turning, and make this a treat for fans of romance with extra bite.

Joanne Owen

Ayesha at Last Synopsis

A big-hearted, captivating, modern-day Muslim Pride and Prejudice, with hijabs instead of top hats and kurtas instead of corsets.

AYESHA SHAMSI has a lot going on. Her dreams of being a poet have been overtaken by a demanding teaching job. Her boisterous Muslim family, and numerous (interfering) aunties, are professional naggers. And her flighty young cousin, about to reject her one hundredth marriage proposal, is a constant reminder that Ayesha is still single. Ayesha might be a little lonely, but the one thing she doesn't want is an arranged marriage. And then she meets Khalid... How could a man so conservative and judgmental (and, yes, smart and annoyingly handsome) have wormed his way into her thoughts so quickly? As for Khalid, he's happy the way he is; his mother will find him a suitable bride. But why can't he get the captivating, outspoken Ayesha out of his mind? They're far too different to be a good match, surely...

Ayesha at Last Press Reviews

Enchanting, achingly funny and uplifting, Ayesha at Last is a must read! - Randa Abdel-Fattah, author of Does My Head Look Big in This?

Ayesha At Last is a cross-cultural pleasure, a romp, a modern, Muslim salute to Pride and Prejudice. The lovely, witty writing is testimony to an excellent eye and ear at work. - Elinor Lipman, author of On Turpentine Lane and The Inn at Lake Devine

Uzma Jalaluddin blazes a brilliant new trail with Ayesha At Last, a captivating romance set in the Muslim community, brimming with humour and heart. You will fall in love with Ayesha and Khalid-an Elizabeth and Darcy for our times. - Ausma Zehanat Khan, author of A Dangerous Crossing

This is the book I've been waiting for since my long-running Jane Austen obsession. Move over Darcy, Khalid's in town. - S. K. Ali, author of Morris Award finalist, Saints and Misfits

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All versions of this book

ISBN: 9781786497949
Publication date: 04/04/2019
Publisher: Corvus an imprint of Atlantic Books
Format: Paperback

Book Information

ISBN: 9781786497949
Publication date: 4th April 2019
Author: Uzma Jalaluddin
Publisher: Corvus an imprint of Atlantic Books
Format: Paperback
Pagination: 352 pages
Genres: Literary Fiction, Relationship Stories,
Categories: Romance, Adult & contemporary romance, Islam,

About Uzma Jalaluddin

Uzma Jalaluddin attended the University of Toronto for her undergraduate and teacher's college, where she spent too much time perusing the library stacks for novels to read, and not enough time poring over textbooks. She grew up in a close knit, diverse neighbourhood in Toronto, Canada,and regularly attended events at her local mosque, even when her parents didn't make her. Today she teaches in a public high school, and writes 'Samosas and Maple Syrup,' a parenting and culture column for The Toronto Star, Canada's largest daily newspaper. All of her reading and secret novel writing eventually paid off... ...

More About Uzma Jalaluddin

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