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Sharon Hartman Strom - Author

About the Author

Books by Sharon Hartman Strom

Fortune, Fame, and Desire Promoting the Self in the Long Nineteenth Century

Fortune, Fame, and Desire Promoting the Self in the Long Nineteenth Century

Author: Sharon Hartman Strom Format: Hardback Release Date: 19/09/2016

In the middle decades of the nineteenth century, a widening set of opportunities in the public sphere opened up for ambitious men and women in the loosely structured stratum of the middle class. Much of the attention to the marketplace between 1820 and 1910 has described entrepreneurship and the beginnings of a more sophisticated economy, but not much has been paid to the commodification of the self. This book sets out to explore the promotion of the self in the rapidly growing economy and political flux of the nineteenth century. Its geography extends through New England, New York, the new states of the Midwest, and the great cities of the Mid-Atlantic, with an occasional trip to New Orleans, San Francisco and Los Angeles. The approach is biographical, using representative middle class figures to illuminate cultural and social history. Aided by more cheaply produced print and the clamor of the American public for entertainment both high and low brow, the figures described in this book strove for fame, sometimes achieved good fortune, and acted out desires for sexual pleasure, political success, and achieving the ideal in society. In doing so they questioned and rearranged the ideas of the early Republic. Poised between the dying class structure of the late eighteenth century and the rise of a more hierarchical one in the early twentieth, they took advantage of a society in flux to make their mark on American culture.

Confederates in the Tropics Charles Swett's Travelogue of 1868

Confederates in the Tropics Charles Swett's Travelogue of 1868

Author: Sharon Hartman Strom, Frederick Stirton Weaver Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/03/2013

Charles Swett (1828-1910) was a prosperous Vicksburg merchant and small plantation owner who was reluctantly drawn into secession but then rallied behind the Confederate cause, serving with distinction in the Confederate Army. After the war some of Swett's peers from Mississippi and other southern states invited him to explore the possibility of settling in British Honduras or the Republic of Honduras.Confederates in the Tropics uses Swett's 1868 travelogue to explore the motives of would-be Confederate migrants' fleeing defeat and Reconstruction in the United States South. The authors make a comparative analysis of Confederate communities in Latin America and use Charles Swett's life to illustrate the travails and hopes of the period for both blacks and whites.Swett's diary is presented here in its entirety in a clear, accessible format, edited for contemporary readers. Swett's style, except for his passionate prefatory remarks, is a remarkably unsentimental, even scientific look at Belize and Honduras, more akin to a field report than a romantic travel account. In a final section, the authors suggest why the expatriate communities of white southerners nearly always failed, and follow up on Swett's life in Mississippi in a way that sheds light on why disgruntled Confederates decided to remain in or eventually to return to the U.S. South.

Confederates in the Tropics Charles Swett's Travelogue

Confederates in the Tropics Charles Swett's Travelogue

Author: Sharon Hartman Strom, Frederick Stirton Weaver Format: Hardback Release Date: 26/04/2011

Charles Swett (1828-1910) was a prosperous Vicksburg merchant and small plantation owner who was reluctantly drawn into secession but then rallied behind the Confederate cause, serving with distinction in the Confederate Army. After the war some of Swett's peers from Mississippi and other southern states invited him to explore the possibility of settling in British Honduras or the Republic of Honduras.Confederates in the Tropics uses Swett's 1868 travelogue to explore the motives of would-be Confederate migrants' fleeing defeat and Reconstruction in the United States South. The authors make a comparative analysis of Confederate communities in Latin America, and use Charles Swett's life to illustrate the travails and hopes of the period for both blacks and whites.Swett's diary is presented here in its entirety in a clear, accessible format, edited for contemporary readers. Swett's style, except for his passionate prefatory remarks, is a remarkably unsentimental, even scientific look at Belize and Honduras, more akin to a field report than a romantic travel account. In a final section, the authors suggest why the expatriate communities of white Southerners nearly always failed, and follow up on Swett's life in Mississippi in a way that sheds light on why disgruntled Confederates decided to remain in or eventually to return to the U.S. South.

Women's Rights

Women's Rights

Author: Sharon Hartman Strom Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/01/2003

Women's rights issues have been a part of the political and social fabric of the United States since the Declaration of Independence. In fact, women's rights activists have often wielded principles enunciated in the Declaration as they struggled to secure equality. This reference source examines 15 controversial issues concerning women's rights in the United States. A historical overview introduces each issue, followed by the presentation of primary documents that illustrate the various positions women and men have taken in support of or opposition to the issue at hand. Chapters highlight such landmark issues as the Declaration of the Rights of Women, women in the labor movement, women's suffrage, the politics of birth control and abortion, and Title IX. Each chapter concludes with an annotated list of sources to direct students in further research, making this a perfect starting point for students interested in examining the drama, impact, and constant national influence of women's issues.

BEYOND THE TYPEWRITER GENDER, CLASS, AND THE ORIGINS OF MODER

BEYOND THE TYPEWRITER GENDER, CLASS, AND THE ORIGINS OF MODER

Author: Sharon Hartman Strom Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/06/1994

By World War I, managers wanted young women with some high school education for new light manufacturing jobs in the office. Women could be paid significantly less than men with equivalent educations and the marriage bar --the practice of not hiring or retaining married women--ensured that most of them would leave the workplace before the issue of higher salaries arose. Encouraged by free training gained in high schools and by working conditions better than those available in factories, young working-class women sought out office jobs. Facing sexual discrimination in most of the professions and higher-level office jobs, middle-class women often found themselves falling into clerical positions. Sharon Hartman Strom details office working conditions and practices, drawing upon archival and anecdotal data. She analyzes women office-workers' ambitions and explores how the influences of scientific management, personnel management, and secondary vocational education affected office workplaces and hierarchies. Strom illustrates how businessmen manipulated concepts of scientific management to maintain male dominance and professional status and to confine women to supportive positions. She finds that women's responses to the reorganized workplace were varied; although they were able to advance professionally in only limited ways, they used their jobs as a means of pursuing friendships, education, and independence.