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Tom Wood - Author

About the Author

Tom Wood was born and raised in Staffordshire and now lives in London. Before taking up writing he was employed as a bookseller, cleaner, factory worker, labourer, supermarket cashier and video editor.

Featured books by Tom Wood

Better off Dead

Better off Dead

Author: Tom Wood Format: Paperback Release Date: 20/11/2014

Victor is the face in the crowd you don't see, a perfect assassin with nothing to live for. But when an old friend turns to him for help, he finds he can't refuse. For once his objective isn't to kill, but to protect. Hunted through the streets of London by ruthless enemies, Victor needs to be more than just a bodyguard...but his every move leads danger closer to the very person he's vowed to defend.

ebook of the month

Other books by Tom Wood

The Hunter (Victor the Assassin 1)

The Hunter (Victor the Assassin 1)

Author: Tom Wood Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 12/05/2011

His name is a cover He has no home And he kills for a living Victor is a hitman, a man with no past and no surname. His world is one of paranoia and obsessive attention to detail; his morality lies either dead or dying. No one knows what truly motivates the hunter. No one gets close enough to ask. When a Paris job goes spectacularly wrong, Victor finds himself running for his life across four continents, pursued by a kill squad and investigated by secret services from more than one country. With meticulous style, Victor plans his escape . . . and takes the fight to his would-be killers. In this first novel in the explosive Victor series, it's not about right and wrong - only about who lives and who dies.

Claptrap A Comedy in Two Acts

Claptrap A Comedy in Two Acts

Author: Tom Wood Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/09/1998

Late spring in Oslo, Ontario. The annual Ibsen Festival begins with auditions, then rehearsals, and, finally, performances. This year, the Ibfest features productions of five classic plays: The Twins, a renaissance play in the, er, tradition of Shakespeare; Virtue Slandered, a restoration comedy in the, um, fashion of Sheridan; The Raj, a nineteen century look at those quirky, madcap, but well-meaning Brits in a backward society (it's a musical!); Pantilous in Crete, a classic Greek tragedy about an Athenian, having offended Zeus, who is doomed to live a life of horrors; and the Canadian classic, Frozen Wheat, about a Quebucois couple stranded on the prairies in the dead of winter, their son growing up Anglais, their daughter pregnant, with relatives from Newfoundland causing havoc and humorous but touching situations. The actors in the company include (among many others) Dirk Hart, the gorgeous American film star, making an attempt at serious theatre; Simon Webber-Douglas, Canadian-born but British-trained, which makes him almost good; and Julia Hudson, talented, Canadian-born and trained, and the target of the Ibfestos sarcasm, sadism, and cruelty. Antony Manley-Dunn presides over the Ibfest as one imagines Cecil Rhodes did the continent of Africa. Claptrap is a grand satire of the colonial mentality that governs the theatre festivals of Canada. Anyone who has worked at, performed in, been to, or even heard about the Stratford or Shaw festivals will laugh heartily and with recognition. Although a play, Claptrap reads much like a comic novel; here is Tom Wood's description of the development of the festival: Oslo's biggest claim to fame before the Festival was the Hastverk Fish Pickling Plant (Herring and Smelt). When the town was floundering in the early 1960s, the city fathers hit upon the idea of having a summer festival of Norwegian culture. Dancing, food, sports, and the community players performed A Doll's House at the town hall. The cultural festival failed miserably, but the play was a modest success. The town fathers decided to follow in the footsteps of two other theatrical festivals and gussied up the town to look more period. 1850s Norway, to be exact. Local businesses slapped on facades and adopted Ibsenesque names: the hair salon became Hedda Hair; the pub, Gabbler's; the funeral parlor, Ghosts; the hotel and convention centre, Gynt Pier Inn.