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Steph Gillett - Author

About the Author

Books by Steph Gillett

The Midland & Great Northern Joint Railway Through Time

The Midland & Great Northern Joint Railway Through Time

Author: Steph Gillett Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/09/2019

Almost the entire network of the former Midland & Great Northern Joint Railway system closed at the end of February 1959. Some short sections of the railway were retained for passenger services until the mid-1960s and freight continued to run on a few others, one surviving into the 1980s. Only the passenger service between Cromer and Sheringham on the north Norfolk coast survives as part of the national network, which is now reached by the route of one-time competitor the Great Eastern Railway. Over sixty years after closure, interest in the M&GNJR and its predecessors remains high. The North Norfolk Railway runs its steam trains from the original station at Sheringham to a new one at Holt, a railway heritage centre has been established at Whitwell & Reepham station, and the M&GN Circle continues to research and celebrate this long-closed railway. There is much remaining evidence of the railway and sections of the trackbed provide pleasant walking and cycling routes. Utilising a range of rare and previously unpublished images, Steph Gillett offers a fascinating and nostalgic look back at this fondly remembered line.

The Midland & South Western Junction Railway Through Time

The Midland & South Western Junction Railway Through Time

Author: Steph Gillett Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/08/2018

The Midland & South Western Junction Railway was formed in 1884 by amalgamation of the Swindon, Marlborough & Andover and the Swindon & Cheltenham Extension railways. It provided a north-south link between the Midland and the London & South Western railways through the heartland of the Great Western Railway. It also served several military establishments in Wiltshire. It joined the Banbury & Cheltenham Direct Railway at Andoversford with running rights to Cheltenham; its junction with the L&SWR was at Andover. Passing west of the GWR station at Swindon, it is sometimes referred to as `Swindon's Other Railway' but was absorbed by the GWR in 1923. The line was closed by British Railways in 1961, apart from a few freight sections that had gone by 1970. The Swindon & Cricklade heritage railway is recreating some of the line from its base at Blunsdon. Several sections of the trackbed have been converted to pleasant walking and cycling routes.

Bristol and Gloucestershire Aerospace Industry

Bristol and Gloucestershire Aerospace Industry

Author: Steph Gillett Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/10/2017

The British & Colonial Aeroplane Company was established in 1910 at Filton on a site that is now an Airbus design and engineering centre. BAE Systems also has facilities at Filton. Bristol aircraft engines were first built at the nearby Patchway site in the 1920s, part of which Rolls-Royce uses to manufacture aero engines. From Boxkite to Concorde, many famous aircraft were built at Bristol. Beginning with fighter aircraft manufactured during the First World War, Gloster Aircraft went on to produce aircraft until closure in 1964, including the RAF's last biplane and its first jet fighter. Dowty developed landing gear and fuel control systems and acquired Rotol Airscrews. Parnall constructed aircraft and gun turrets at sites in Bristol and Yate. This book covers the wider aspects of the aerospace industry, including its industrial heritage, social impacts, technological developments, and continuing significance, utilising a number of archives to create a unique and well-illustrated view of aviation around Bristol and Gloucestershire.

Somerset & Dorset Railway Through Time

Somerset & Dorset Railway Through Time

Author: Steph Gillett Format: eBook Release Date: 15/02/2016

The Somerset & Dorset Railway, known as the S&D (said to also stand for 'Slow and Dirty' or 'Serene and Delightful'), ran from Bath across the Mendip hills to Bournemouth on the south coast. Never a high-speed line, the main traffic for the Somerset & Dorset during the winter months was freight and local passenger traffic. In the summer, however, there was heavy traffic as Saturday holiday services from the northern industrial towns passed along the line. In 1962, John Betjeman travelled along the Somerset & Dorset from Evercreech Junction to Highbridge and Burnham-on-Sea, making a BBC documentary called Branch Line Railway, in which he pleaded for the line to be spared from the Beeching cuts. However, despite an active campaign to save it, and the promise by the new Labour government that there would be no more railway cutbacks, on 7 March 1966 the whole line was closed. 2016 will see the fiftieth anniversary of the closure of this much-mourned railway; here in this well-illustrated book, the history of the line is preserved.

The Somerset & Dorset Railway Through Time

The Somerset & Dorset Railway Through Time

Author: Steph Gillett Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 11/02/2016

The Somerset & Dorset Railway, known as the S&D (said to also stand for `Slow and Dirty' or `Serene and Delightful'), ran from Bath across the Mendip hills to Bournemouth on the south coast. Never a high-speed line, the main traffic for the Somerset & Dorset during the winter months was freight and local passenger traffic. In the summer, however, there was heavy traffic as Saturday holiday services from the northern industrial towns passed along the line. In 1962, John Betjeman travelled along the Somerset & Dorset from Evercreech Junction to Highbridge and Burnham-on-Sea, making a BBC documentary called Branch Line Railway, in which he pleaded for the line to be spared from the Beeching cuts. However, despite an active campaign to save it, and the promise by the new Labour government that there would be no more railway cutbacks, on 7 March 1966 the whole line was closed. 2016 will see the fiftieth anniversary of the closure of this much-mourned railway; here in this well-illustrated book, the history of the line is preserved.