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Audiobooks Narrated by David Bernard

Browse audiobooks narrated by David Bernard, listen to samples and when you're ready head over to Audiobooks.com where you can get 3 FREE audiobooks on us

LoveReading Top 10

  1. How to Own the Room: Women and the Art of Brilliant Speaking Audiobook How to Own the Room: Women and the Art of Brilliant Speaking
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  2. Between the World and Me Audiobook Between the World and Me
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  3. The Gates of Athens: Book One of Athenian Audiobook The Gates of Athens: Book One of Athenian
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  4. Written in Blood Audiobook Written in Blood
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  5. The Giver of Stars: Fall in love with the enchanting Sunday Times bestseller from the author of Me B Audiobook The Giver of Stars: Fall in love with the enchanting Sunday Times bestseller from the author of Me B
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  6. The Last Widow Audiobook The Last Widow
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  7. Daughters of Cornwall Audiobook Daughters of Cornwall
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  8. How Do We Know We're Doing It Right?: Essays on Modern Life Audiobook How Do We Know We're Doing It Right?: Essays on Modern Life
    8
  9. The Facilitator Audiobook The Facilitator
    9
  10. The Lying Life of Adults Audiobook The Lying Life of Adults
    10
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Crypto: The Future of Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, and Other Altcoins Audiobook

Crypto: The Future of Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, and Other Altcoins

Author: Johnnie Alberts Narrator: David Bernard Release Date: December 2019

Before you decide to get rid of all your money in some vague belief in cryptocurrencies like the Dutch “Bitcoin family,” consider that there are risks attached. I’m not saying that you shouldn’t invest in cryptos at all, but that you should know what you’re doing. To assist you with that knowledge, I’ve put together a guide that warns against scams and risks of bitcoin, shows opportunities and some events that have helped, and point out a bunch of other interesting stuff as well. You’ll learn more about Ripple and XRP, the one coin I put some of my savings into (and I’ll tell you why). And as the cherry on the top of the cake, I’ll show you what ICOs are and why some people have decided to invest in those as well. Don’t wait and get started now!

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Crypto: Learning How to Invest and Estimate with Cryptocurrencies Audiobook

Crypto: Learning How to Invest and Estimate with Cryptocurrencies

Author: Johnnie Alberts Narrator: David Bernard Release Date: December 2019

Cryptocurrencies are back! After the enormous rise of bitcoin and other coins at the end of 2017, we are looking at an industry that won’t go away. In the summer of 2019, bitcoin rose from 3,000 dollars to around 12,000 dollars. Since then, the other coins have equally risen and dropped, and fluctuating values are now hot and fascinatingly bullish. For those who want to learn more about this crazy, risky but worthy industry of coin trading or passive investing, there is this guide, filled with more information so you can understand what you’re getting yourself into. Doing some research before putting your hard-earned money into something, is mandatory for success in 99% of the cases. So do yourself a favor and get educated.

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Cantre'r Gwaelod: The Mysterious Legend of the Ancient Sunken Kingdom Known as the Welsh Atlantis Audiobook

Cantre'r Gwaelod: The Mysterious Legend of the Ancient Sunken Kingdom Known as the Welsh Atlantis

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: David Bernard Release Date: October 2019

"We can trace almost all the disasters of English history to the influence of Wales." - Evelyn Waugh, English novelist Wales is a whimsical country with a powerful, complex, myth-filled and oft disputed history. In 2004, geneticists working with geographers and archaeological colleagues undertook a "People of the British Isle" study. They sought out thousands of volunteers, all four of whose grandparents had been born in the same place, and they analyzed their genetic make-up. "Modern genetic analysis can read the patterns of variation in our complete set of DNA . . . that change subtly over time," producing a genetic signature that reveals geographical origins. This provides a window into history and helps explain why Wales is so singular and self contained. (Settlers: Genetics, geography and the peopling of Britain N D). The results of this project confirmed that the Welsh are unique, despite the common belief that the term "Celtic" is an homogenous concept that can be used as an overall term that includes the Irish, the Welsh, the Scottish clans, and Cornwellians. "Celtic" is much more nuanced. The study revealed that there are 17 distinct genetic clusters of people in the modern United Kingdom: the dominant clusters are in Central and Southern England; nine smaller clusters are identified in England and Wales; Western Scotland and Northern Ireland share a great deal of genetic material; and Cornish, Welsh, Irish and Scottish, normally thought of as "Celtic," are significantly genetically diverse. The real kicker is that the present Welsh are much more closely related to the original Britons than the rest of the inhabitants of the United Kingdom. The "settlers" project concludes that "the Welsh are the true, pure Britons, according to the research that has produced the first genetic map of the UK." (Settlers: Genetics, geography and the peopling of Britain. N D)

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Uluru: The History and Legacy of the Australian Landmark Considered Sacred by the Local Aborigines Audiobook

Uluru: The History and Legacy of the Australian Landmark Considered Sacred by the Local Aborigines

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: David Bernard Release Date: September 2019

The magnificent monolith the locals call "Uluru," situated in the heart of Australia, hovers over a patchy bed of desert poplars and spinifex grasslands. The pleasant, but otherwise unexceptional surroundings of the spellbinding sandstone landform only further accentuates its majesty, one that can be appreciated from a variety of angles. To lime-colored budgerigars, mighty brown falcons, passengers in planes and helicopters, and other creatures blessed with the gift of flight, the free-form rock is reminiscent of the fossil of a spiky fish, a misshapen arrowhead, or perhaps a peculiar, ocher-tinged seashell peeking out of the sand. To those gazing upon the natural gem on solid ground, the flat-topped, burnt sienna beauty, marked with character-forming dimples, ripples, and ridges, looks more like a sleeping, thousand-year-old turtle, particularly through squinted eyes.   Its striking appearance aside, Uluru, also known as "Ayers Rock," is far more than an unmissable landmark. Uluru represents an inimitable symbol of life and culture, and a place of worship sacred to the region's aboriginal inhabitants. Given the long and riveting history attached to this hallowed rock, the aura of mysticality and mystery that clings to Uluru should come as no surprise. Not only does the rock's flaky surface change color throughout the day - going from a deep violet with hints of gray to a light lilac, to a fiery orange-red during sunrise, and from its usual apricot-gold to a faded orange, to a dreamy purplish-pink at dusk - Uluru, they say, is an endless source of inexplicable happenings and paranormal occurrences.  

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Patrice Lumumba: The Life and Legacy of the Pan-African Politician Who Became Congo's First Prime Mi Audiobook

Patrice Lumumba: The Life and Legacy of the Pan-African Politician Who Became Congo's First Prime Mi

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: David Bernard Release Date: September 2019

As was the case across Africa, the political mood in the Congo colony remained stable until the end of World War II, but in 1947, India achieved independence and triggered a domino effect that led to the rapid decolonization of Africa. The first sub-Saharan territory to win independence was Ghana, which was handed over in 1957, followed in quick succession by the French territories of Guinea, Cameroon, Senegal, Togo and Mali. As far as Belgium was concerned, the writing was on the wall. As civil unrest began to break out in the major cities, and as the countryside became increasingly less secure, the Belgian authorities began to sense the possibility of a civil war, and arrangements were made to quit the territory as quickly and cleanly as possible. It was in the nature of Belgium's withdrawal from Africa that power was essentially handed over to the first in line to receive it. Very little of the careful preparation that characterized the British withdrawal from Africa was evident in Congo, in major part due to the fact that the Belgian system of administration allowed for no phased entry of Congolese employees into the executive level, so there was no one trained or experienced in running a government who was in a position to take over from the departing Belgians. The same, indeed, was true in the armed forces. As it turned out, the first in line to take power was a tall, stern-featured ideologue by the name of Patrice Lumumba. Though he was still just 35, his life story was already one full of ideology, politics, and chaos, and things would only get more turbulent once he became the Congo's leader. Patrice Lumumba: The Life and Legacy of the Pan-African Politician Who Became Congo's First Prime Minister looks at one of the most important African leaders of the 20th century. 

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Mamluks, The: The History and Legacy of the Medieval Slave Soldiers Who Established a Dynasty in Egy Audiobook

Mamluks, The: The History and Legacy of the Medieval Slave Soldiers Who Established a Dynasty in Egy

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: David Bernard Release Date: September 2019

Egypt in the 14th century was a glorious kingdom to behold. Spice merchants from Europe, Asia and Africa sailed up the Nile River to the great port city of Alexandria, carrying riches such as silk, jewels and spices. Cairo, the capital of Egypt, was the greatest city in the Islamic world, with a larger population and more wealth and splendor than any city in Europe. Cairo was a shining pinnacle of cosmopolitan splendor in the medieval world, and besides being a major trading hub, Cairo was famous for its scholars and intellectual class, offering countless academic opportunities for scholars across the Islamic world. The culture of Cairo was dynamic and famous for its wide range of intellectual debates on Islamic sciences and other academic fields, all of which far surpassed any contemporary city at the time. From across the Islamic world, scholars from all the major schools of thought were represented in Cairo. Spirited lectures occurred frequently in public squares and madrasas were often packed with patrons eagerly listening to readings by famed scholars. Cairo was a city filled with art, trade and knowledge. However, there was another factor that made Cairo infamous. The city represented the last bastion of the Muslim world - a great Islamic caliphate, centered in Iraq, had once stretched from the edges of Central Asia to Spain, but invasions by outside enemies had mostly overrun this once mighty empire. The Mongol armies, pouring forth from their grasslands in Asia, had sacked Baghdad in 1258, destroying the caliphate and sending the Islamic world into a state of deep peril. Moreover, European crusaders had launched multiple invasions into Palestine and the Levant, threatening the very existence of the Muslim world. Ultimately these foreign invaders were all stopped by one group: the Mamluks of Egypt, a group of warriors, slaves, and kings. 

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Sac and Fox, The: The History and Legacy of the Native American Tribe Forcibly Removed from the Midw Audiobook

Sac and Fox, The: The History and Legacy of the Native American Tribe Forcibly Removed from the Midw

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: David Bernard Release Date: August 2019

The development of North America as a series of British colonies prior to the end of the 18th century went ahead without any definitive policy in regards to the Native Americans who were impacted, displaced and not infrequently overwhelmed by the process. The vast majority of Native American people continued to live in a state of grace long after the formation of the colonies and did not begin to feel the impact until the expansion west. Likewise, there could never be a coordinated, pan-tribal unity to confront this gathering invasion, since the indigenous population of the land was heterogeneous, speaking some 300 separate languages, and thousands of regional dialects, and very often they were at war with one another. Some saw an advantage in collaboration with the forces of colonization, and some not. The fate of the former was usually some form of unequal assimilation, and of the latter, removal or extermination, and often both.  On August 4, 1824, a treaty was signed between the Sac and Fox and the government of the United States whereby both relinquished all claim to land in Missouri lying between the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, in exchange for a mere $1,000 annuity running for 10 years and a provision by the government to provide a blacksmith and other laborers, farming implements, and cattle. Then, a year later, the federal government decided to deal once and for all with the ongoing inter-tribal warfare along the upper Mississippi by creating defined borders between the various tribal territories. In August 1825, a grand council was convened at Prairie du Chein, situated more or less at the confluence of the Mississippi and Wisconsin Rivers, where members of the Ojibwe, Dakota, Sauk, Fox, Winnebago, Menominee, Iowa, Ottawa, and Potawatomi attended, and it has often been remarked that the feat of gathering together a convention of so many mutually antagonistic groups was an achievement in itself. 

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Modern Balloons and Airships: The History and Legacy of Dirigibles during the 20th Century Audiobook

Modern Balloons and Airships: The History and Legacy of Dirigibles during the 20th Century

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: David Bernard Release Date: August 2019

The Wright Brothers initially underestimated the difficulties involved in flying, and they were apparently surprised by the fact that so many others were working on solving the "problem of human flight" already. Decades before their own historic plane would end up in the National Air & Space Museum, Wilbur and Orville asked the Smithsonian for reading materials and brushed up on everything from the works of their contemporaries to Leonardo Da Vinci. Undeterred by the work, and the fact that several would-be pioneers died in crashes trying to control gliders, the Wright Brothers tested out gliding at Kitty Hawk in North Carolina for several years, working to perfect pilot control before trying powered flight. In December 1903, the brothers had done enough scientific work with concepts like lift to help their aeronautical designs, and they had the technical know-how to work with engines. On December 17, the brothers took turns making history's first successful powered flights. The fourth and final flight lasted nearly a minute and covered nearly 900 feet. The Wright Flyer I had just made history, and minutes later it would be permanently damaged after wind gusts tipped it over; it would never fly again. A decade later, aircraft appeared in the skies over the battlefields of World War I, but they did not represent a complete novelty in warfare either, at least not during the early months of World War I. While airplanes had never before appeared above the field of war, other aerial vehicles had already been in use for decades, and balloons had carried soldiers above the landscape for centuries to provide a high observation point superior to most geological features. The French used a balloon for this purpose at the Battle of Fleurus in 1794, and by the American Civil War, military hydrogen balloons saw frequent use, filled from wagons generating hydrogen from iron filings and sulfuric acid.

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Havana: The History and Legacy of Cuba's Capital Audiobook

Havana: The History and Legacy of Cuba's Capital

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: David Bernard Release Date: August 2019

"As far as cities go, Havana is a festering treasure chest, a primary color..." - Brin-Jonathan Butler, Cuban-Canadian author A trip to Havana, Cuba, otherwise known as the "City of Columns," tops many bucket lists for good reason. The mere mention of this once-hidden gem of a city, situated on the western part of the largest Caribbean island nation, evokes the breathtaking imagery of sun-soaked streets and sprawling, golden-sand beaches surrounded by twinkling, almost impossibly crystalline waters, reminiscent of pastel sapphires. Nostalgic types are more likely to envision the time capsule-like qualities of Havana, namely the delightful rows of brightly-colored buildings painted in various shades of canary-yellow, watermelon-pink, and tangerine-orange, and the funky, non-ironic collection of vintage '50s cars cruising the streets. The stunning murals and mosaics, ranging from realistic and beautifully poignant black-and-white pieces to fantastical abstract works and uniquely traditional, stylized opuses, only add to the intoxicating vibrancy of the city. Even those who aren't there can practically imagine the robust bouquet of classic Cuban cigars mingling with the mouthwatering aroma of freshly brewed, home-grown coffee. Havana: The History and Legacy of Cuba's Capital chronicles the rise of the Cuban city, and the turbulent history that has made it one of the world's most interesting locations. 

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Famous Dirigibles: The History and Legacy of Lighter than Air Vehicles from the Renaissance to Today Audiobook

Famous Dirigibles: The History and Legacy of Lighter than Air Vehicles from the Renaissance to Today

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: David Bernard Release Date: August 2019

Aircraft appeared in the skies over the battlefields of World War I, but they did not represent a complete novelty in warfare either, at least not during the early months of World War I. While airplanes had never before appeared above the field of war, other aerial vehicles had already been in use for decades, and balloons had carried soldiers above the landscape for centuries to provide a high observation point superior to most geological features. The French used a balloon for this purpose at the Battle of Fleurus in 1794, and by the American Civil War, military hydrogen balloons saw frequent use, filled from wagons generating hydrogen from iron filings and sulfuric acid. The balloonist Thaddeus Lowe persuaded President Abraham Lincoln to use the airships for observation, communicating troop movements to the ground with a telegraph wire.  Indeed, with advances in dirigible technology, many military thinkers and even aeronautical enthusiasts believed that blimps would remain the chief military aerial asset more or less forever. These men thought airplanes would play a secondary role at best, and that they might even prove a uselessly expensive gimmick soon to fade back into obscurity, leaving the majestic bulk of the dirigible as sole master of the skies. While this obviously did not prove true, dirigibles proved popular in a variety of different ways throughout the 20th century, and they continued to be complements even as airplane technologies rapidly advanced. Famous Dirigibles: The History and Legacy of Lighter than Air Vehicles from the Renaissance to Today looks at the development of the balloons and airships, and how they were primarily used. 

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