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The Lighthouse

by Alison Moore

eBooks of the Month Modern and Classic Literary Fiction

LoveReading View on The Lighthouse

Winner of the McKitterick Prize 2013.

Shortlisted for the Specsavers National Book Awards 'New Writer of the Year' 2012.

Shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2012.

This was Lovereading's favourite to win the 2012 Man Booker Prize. Just click on the 'Download Extract' button above to try it for yourself.

 

Sir Peter Stothard, Chair of Man Booker Prize 2012 judging panel, on The Lighthouse...

'The Lighthouse by Alison Moore is a first novel in which a middle-aged man crosses the channel by ferry for a summer walking holiday in Germany after the failure of his marriage. His first hotel landlady welcomes him into one of her many beds. He has his mother's perfume bottle, shaped like a lighthouse, in his pocket - and in his mind a mess of more damaging memories from childhood.  This too came from a small publisher - a bleak inner landscape, written with a temperature control set low and an acute sense of smell.'

 

“Melancholy and haunting. The sense of loneliness and discomfort and rejection is compelling, the low key prose carefully handled. It’s a serious novel with a distinctive and unsettling atmosphere.” — Margaret Drabble

The Lighthouse Synopsis

The Lighthouse begins on a North Sea ferry, on whose blustery outer deck stands Futh, a middle-aged, recently separated man heading to Germany for a restorative walking holiday.

 


Spending his first night in Hellhaus at a small, family-run hotel, he finds the landlady hospitable but is troubled by an encounter with an inexplicably hostile barman.

In the morning, Futh puts the episode behind him and sets out on his week-long circular walk along the Rhine. As he travels, he contemplates his childhood; a complicated friendship with the son of a lonely neighbour; his parents’ broken marriage and his own. But the story he keeps coming back to, the person and the event affecting all others, is his mother and her abandonment of him as a boy, which left him with a void to fill, a substitute to find.

He recalls his first trip to Germany with his newly single father. He is mindful of something he neglected to do there, an omission which threatens to have devastating repercussions for him this time around.

At the end of the week, Futh, sunburnt and blistered, comes to the end of his circular walk, returning to what he sees as the sanctuary of the Hellhaus hotel, unaware of the events which have been unfolding there in his absence.

The Lighthouse Press Reviews

“The Lighthouse is a tantalising glimpse into the circling, obsessive nature of memory and the darkness of returning. It is a tightly wound mystery, a love story, and a meditation on family and loss. A spare, slim novel that explores grief and loss, the patterns in the way we are hurt and hurt others, and the childlike helplessness we feel as we suffer rejection and abandonment. It explores the central question about leaving and being left: even when it feels inevitable, why does it hurt so much, and why is this particular kind of numbness so repellent to others? The brutal ending continues to shock after several re-readings. Stunning.” — Jenn Ashworth, Guardian

 

The Lighthouse looks simple but isn't, refusing to unscramble what seems a bleak moral about the hazards of reproduction, in the widest sense. Small wonder that it stood up to the crash-testing of a prize jury's reading and rereading. One of the year's 12 best novels? I can believe it.”Anthony Cummins The Observer

 

“Melancholy and haunting. The sense of loneliness and discomfort and rejection is compelling, the low key prose carefully handled. It’s a serious novel with a distinctive and unsettling atmosphere.” —Margaret Drabble

A haunting and accomplished novel.” —Katy Guest The Independent on Sunday

“It is this accumulation of the quotidian, in prose as tight as Magnus Mills’s, which lends Moore’s book its standout nature, and brings the novel to its ambiguous, thrilling end.” —Philip Womack The Telegraph

“No surprise that this quietly startling novel won column inches when it landed on the Man Booker Prize longlist. After all, it’s a slender debut released by a tiny independent publisher. Don’t mistake The Lighthouse for an underdog, though. For starters, it’s far too assured … Though sparely told, the novel’s simple-seeming narrative has the density of far longer work. People and places are intricately evoked with a forensic feel for mood. It’s title becomes a recurring motif, from the Morse code torch flashes of Futh’s boyhood to the lighthouse-shaped silver perfume case that he carries in his pocket, history filling the void left by its missing vial of scent. Warnings are emitted, too – by Futh’s anxious aunt and an intense man he meets on the ferry. It all stokes a sense of ominousness that makes the denouement not a bit less shocking.” —Hephzibah Anderson The Daily Mail

“This is powerful writing likely to shine in your memory for a long time.” —Emily Cleaver LITRO Magazine


“Alison Moore's writing is exquisite, the prose simple and powerful, but it's the use of imagery which really marks it out as something special. ” —Sue Magee The Bookbag

 “In The Lighthouse Alison Moore has created an unsettling, seemingly becalmed but oddly sensual, and entirely excellent novel.” —Alan Bowden Words of Mercury

“Alison Moore's debut novel has all the assurance of a veteran, a strong contender for the prize, its sense of despair will either be its making or its undoing: 9/10.” —Roz Davison Don't Read That Read This

 “Ultimately,what drew me into this bleak tale of sorrow and abandonment was the quality of the writing – so taut and economical it even looked different on the page somehow – and so effective in creating a mounting sense of menace and unease. It never flinches.” —Isabel Costello On the literary sofa

“Moore’s writing has a superb sense of the weight of memory.” —Kate Saunders The Times

“The writing in The Lighthouse is spare and deceptively simple – there is in fact nothing simple about it – it is the kind of pared down writing that hides a multitude of complexities and leaves behind it an array of images and in this case scents. Upon closing this terribly bittersweet novel, the reader is assaulted by the memory of violets, camphor and cigarette smoke. There are several returning images and motifs in the novel, such as lighthouses, bathrooms, scents and abandonment which are beautifully explored.” —Heavenali.wordpress.com

“This is a book that might have vanished had it not been picked up by the Booker judges. It deserves to be read, and reread. No laughs, no levity, just a beautiful, sad, overripe tale that lingers in the mind.” —Isabel Berwick Financial Times

“What must have gone some way to earning The Lighthouse a place on the longlist, though, is the admirable simplicity of Moore’s prose. Like Futh, its without flourishes, yet beneath its outward straightforwardness lies a hauntingly complex exploration of the recurring patterns that life inevitably follows, often as a consequence of one’s past.” —Francesca Angelini The Sunday Times

 

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All versions of this book

ISBN: 9781907773174
Publication date: 15/08/2012
Publisher: Salt Publishing
Format: Paperback

Book Information

ISBN: 9781907773174
Publication date: 15th August 2012
Author: Alison Moore
Publisher: Salt Publishing
Format: Paperback
Pagination: 192 pages
Genres: eBook Favourites, Literary Fiction,
Categories: Modern & contemporary fiction (post c 1945),

About Alison Moore

Alison Moore's first novel, The Lighthouse, was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and the National Book Awards (New Writer of the Year), winning the McKitterick Prize. Both The Lighthouse and her second novel, He Wants, were Observer Books of the Year. Her shorter fiction has been included in Best British Short Stories and Best British Horror anthologies, broadcast on BBC Radio 4 Extra and collected in The Pre-War House and Other Stories. Born in Manchester in 1971, she lives near Nottingham with her husband Dan and son Arthur.

More About Alison Moore

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