LoveReading

Becoming a member of the LoveReading community is free.

No catches, no fine print just unadulterated book loving, with your favourite books saved to your own digital bookshelf.

New members get entered into our monthly draw to win £100 to spend in your local bookshop Plus lots lots more…

Find out more

LoveReading - Editorial Expert

Latest Reviews By LoveReading

Any adult who deals with children, and not just teachers and others who work in school settings, would find this enlightening, thought provoking and revealing.  As we learn from the little snippets from the school reports of Paul Dix at the end of each chapter, the author has direct experience of being one of the ‘bad boys’ and now has more than 25 years of working to transform the most challenging behaviour in schools, referral units and colleges to call upon. As a 14-year-old he vowed he would change the way adults deal with behaviour and I defy ... View Full Review
This is a book which any adult who deals with children, and not just teachers and others who work in school settings, would find enlightening, thought provoking and revealing.  As we learn from the little snippets from the school reports of Paul Dix at the end of each chapter, the author has direct experience of being one of the ‘bad boys’ and now has more than 25 years of working to transform the most challenging behaviour in schools, referral units and colleges to call upon. As a 14-year-old he vowed he would change the way adults deal with ... View Full Review
Fiercely told, this is a powerful coming-of-age story told in verse, from one of the UK's leading poets, Dean Atta. Perfect for fans of Sarah Crossan and The Poet X. A boy comes to terms with his identity as a mixed-race gay teen - then at university he finds his wings as a drag artist, The Black Flamingo. A bold story about the power of embracing your uniqueness. Sometimes, we need to take charge, to stand up wearing pink feathers - to show ourselves to the world in bold colour. View Full Review
This light-hearted, easy-to-read tale set in the USA, is told through emails, texts, diary entries, and extracts from stories. When her relationship falters Crystal finds herself living back with her loving but interfering Mom. Crystal decides her mum needs a boyfriend and signs her up for a lifelike experimental robot, what on earth could go wrong?! I started reading with a slight hesitation but soon settled down as I got used to the texts and emails laid out on the page in front of me. The characters are inventively introduced by Crystal Hemmingway through different forms of electronic communication. The ... View Full Review
An exciting thriller with a lot of surprises. I wasn’t expecting this crime thriller to be as good as it was, especially taking into account that Robin Driscoll is more well known as being the writer for Mr. Bean. The Unborn, his first novel in the Josie King Detective series, is a relatively short novel and only took me a day to read once I had started it. It is a real page-turner. The title, The Unborn relates to embryos and foeti that are aborted. The crime thriller deals with a religious fanatical group, Nondum Natus, who regard ... View Full Review
What’s Left Unsaid touched me deeply and kept me reading till deep into the night. It is beautifully written and a lot of care has gone into making each character truly come to life on the pages. The novel takes us into the life of Sasha, wife to Jeremy and Mum to 17-year-old Zac, daughter of Annie and Joe. On the surface she seems to have it all, a lovely house, decent job and the most wonderful and loving dog Stanley (prepare to fall in love with him!). But all is not as it seems. Secrets and lies ... View Full Review
This is one of the best books that I have read in a long time.  For sci-fi, thriller, adventure, futuristic the list of genres that can be applied to this novel is first class.  It is similar in style to George Orwell's '1984', only this novel is more terrifying for those living in forty year's time in 2059. More aspects of the United Kingdom's citizens' lives are under Government control and society as we know it today is falling dangerously apart.  The storyline follows the life of one such citizen, Toli, of the mishaps that befall her, ... View Full Review
An interesting and thought-provoking memoir based on Ruth Hartley’s escape to London, and the ordeal she went through to get here in the early 1960’s while pregnant with her first born.  I’m not one to get emotional over books but this is one of those rare occasions where I went through a whole roller-coaster of emotions, ranging from Sadness to happiness to even angry about some of the attitudes that people had in the early 60’s. I know some of these prejudices and stigmas still exist to this day but these day’... View Full Review
Wow! For the Love of Alison had me hooked from the very first chapter on and it just kept giving.  The main character, David, a journalist, gets an unexpected phone call one day to meet his university friend Alison after not having seen her for about 30 years. He jumps at the chance as he used to be obsessed with her in the past to the extent that he had to be hospitalized in a mental institution for a while. The meeting will change his life forever and get him accused of a crime for which there is apparently only ... View Full Review
This has been a very interesting book to read and has a good story line throughout the book. Initially when I started reading it, other sci-fi books and films came to mind as there were scenes in the book and seemed similar to other books and films I have read and seen. As an avid sci-fi fan I thought that it was just a typical distopian novel with survivors such as Jared and nanotechnology but I was wrong. Once I got into the book it turned out to be a very good read and the author's writing flow and descriptive ... View Full Review
Readers less interested in speculating about who Jack the Ripper was in favour of learning more about the women murdered in London’s East End have had little reason to clear shelf space – until now. Finally, a decade on from Neal Shelden’s book, which skims the surface of victims’ stories, Hallie Rubenhold offers a deep-dive into their lives. Divided chronologically in terms of their deaths in 1888, parts covering ‘Polly’, ‘Annie’, ‘Elizabeth’ and ‘Kate’ contain four chapters each; the fifth, ‘Mary Jane’, contains two and is ... View Full Review
I do think the author is a remarkable story teller and I very much enjoyed reading the book. It was very pleasing to see how quickly the action was launched and how the novel maintained its pace. The first sentences almost had the rhythm of the horse’s feet and I loved the fact there were no wasted words. Reading and enjoying the first few paragraphs of a new novel is often key to whether the reader reads on and I loved this first chapter, which could have belonged to many genres.  The novel has a clear story ... View Full Review