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Revelation Space by Alastair Reynolds
  

Revelation Space

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A Special Edition of Revelation Space by Alastair Reynolds to celebrate Orion's 20th anniversary.

REVELATION SPACE: a huge, magnificent space opera that ranges acrioss the known and unknown universe ...towards the most terrifying of destinations.

If you like Alastair Reynolds you might also like to read books by Neal Asher, Kevin J. Anderson and Peter F. Hamilton.

Synopsis

Revelation Space by Alastair Reynolds

Below is a video of Ben Twiston-Davies discussing the sculptures he made for the 20th anniversay edtions of the Orion classics, specifically The Reader by Bernhard Schlink.

Nine hundred thousand years ago, something wiped out the Amarantin. For the human colonists now settling the Amarantin homeworld Resurgam, it's of little more than academic interest, even after the discovery of a long-hidden, almost perfect Amarantin city and a colossal statue of a wingest Amarantin. For brilliant but ruthloess scientist Dan Sylveste, it's more than merelty intellectual curiosity - and he will stop at nothing to get at the truth. Even if the truth costs him everything. But the Amarantin were wiped out for a reason, and that danger is closer and greater than even Syveste imagines ...

Celebrating Orion's 20th Anniversary in chronological order by original publication date are:

1992 The Copper Beech by Maeve Binchy
The first novel published by Orion. A million copy seller from the world’s favourite storyteller.
1992 The Six Wives of Henry VIII by Antonia Fraser
Narrative non-fiction from one of our leading historians. This ground-breaking title is still the definitive book on the subject.
1993 The Black Ice by Michael Connelly
The first Michael Connelly title published by Orion, showcasing our ability to build quality commercial crime brands.
1994 Horrid Henry by Francesca Simon
The original Horrid Henry book was the start of a massive multi-platform entertainment brand demonstrating the breadth of our Children’s list.
1995 Sophie’s World by Jostein Gaarder
A publishing sensation which brought translated literary fiction to the mass market and formed the kernel of the W&N literary fiction list.
1997 Black and Blue by Ian Rankin

Winner of the CWA Gold Dagger, this novel cemented Ian Rankin’s status as the gold standard of British crime.
1997 The Reader by Bernhard Schlink
Translated fiction which sold a million copies and became an award-winning film release, bringing recent history into sharp and unforgettable focus.
2000 A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer
The original Misery memoir, Dave Pelzer’s story was shocking and controversial and founded a genre.
2000 Revelation Space by Alastair Reynolds
Science fiction on the grandest and most commercial scale from Gollancz, redefining space opera for the new century.
2001 Tell No One by Harlan Coben

The event publication which made SUNDAY TIMES No.1 bestseller Harlan Coben a household name and cemented Orion’s ability to create commercial brands.
2003 Stalin by Simon Sebag Montefiore
Winner of the Best History Book at the British Book Awards 2004, this narrative character-based history broke new ground.
2004 The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon
A massive million plus bestseller in the UK and one of the bestselling books of all time in Spain – making translated fiction truly accessible.
2004 Himalaya by Michael Palin
Selling over half a million copies in hardback and staying at No.1 for 11 consecutive weeks, this is the book that proved Michael Palin was not only a beloved television and film personality, he was a formidable travel writer as well.
2004 Wolf Brother by Michelle Paver
Selling over half a million copies at the height of the Harry Potter years and with massive rights sales internationally, this title is one of the stars of our impressive Children’s list.
2005 Labyrinth by Kate Mosse
A huge SUNDAY TIMES No.1 bestseller, this engrossing ‘time-slip’ novel combines brilliant storytelling and strong characters with a puzzle that has obsessed men for centuries: the secret of the Grail.
2007 Salmon Fishing in the Yemen by Paul Torday
Winner of the PG Wodehouse Award, Torday is a unique and indefinable author whose debut won him a substantial, dedicated fan base.
2008 No Time for Goodbye by Linwood Barclay
A true must-read and a Richard and Judy favourite, this title announced the arrival of an exciting new thriller bestseller from Orion.
2009 Dead Until Dark by Charlaine Harris
The first True Blood TV tie-in novel showing the diversity and commercial potential of the Gollancz list.
2010 Life by Keith Richards
This once-in-a-generation memoir of a true rock legend was a formidable No. 1 SUNDAY TIMES bestseller.
2011 The Tiger’s Wife by Téa Obreht
Winner of the 2011 Orange Prize for Fiction, this debut novel has been almost universally praised as a triumph of modern literature and introduced a star of the future.

About the Author

Alastair Reynolds

Alastair Reynolds was born in Barry, South Wales, in 1966. He studied at Newcastle and St Andrews Universities and has a Ph.D. in astronomy. Since 1991 he has lived in the Netherlands, near Leiden. He gave up working as an astrophysicist for the European Space Agency to become a full-time writer. Revelation Space and Pushing Ice were shortlisted for the Arthur C. Clarke Award; Revelation Space, Absolution Gap and Century Rain were shortlisted for the British Science Fiction Award, and Chasm City won the BSFA, and Diamond Dogs was shortlisted for the British Fantasy Award.

Below is a Q & A with this author.

Who’s your favourite author? Considering his career as a whole, and the effect his writing has had on me, I would probably say Arthur C. Clarke. I can still remember the unbearable excitement of reading The City and the Stars for the first time.

Typewriter, word processor or pen? A computer if it's available, but I've written a lot on a typewriter, and am quite happy to write in longhand if necessary. I get a lot of inspiration from doodles and random word-association, so I tend to have a lot of paper around when I'm writing.

What educational qualifications do you have? Have you had any formal tuition in creative writing? If so, where and what? Did you find it useful? I have the usual science-graduate background: degree and doctorate. I wanted to keep studying English (and Art, which I was also good at), but it wasn't possible – it was one or the other. I still bitterly resent that! I've never had any formal tuition in creative writing, but I'm open-minded as to the usefulness of it.

Name your top five pieces of music. Really difficult, this one. When I'm in a classical mood I tend to listen to Vaughan Williams, Shostakovich, Sibelius, but picking one or two choices would be impossible. When I want to rock out I listen to everything from early Who through to recent stuff like Grandaddy and The Flaming Lips. My favourite defunct band is probably The Chameleons, a British group from Manchester who made some fine records. My favourite solo artist would probably be Neil Young.

What were the first pieces of writing that you produced? e.g. short stories, school magazine etc. I wrote stories as soon as I could write. I used to illustrate them myself and staple them up into little books. I wrote two novels before I was 18, and vast numbers of short stories. A story of mine was published in a South Wales regional schools magazine in 1984 – that was a big boost to my confidence. Someone compared it to Malcolm Bradbury, so I went away and read all Bradbury's novels (and then David Lodge). That was good for me as it encouraged me to read beyond science fiction.

Tell us about your best or worst holiday experience. Best experience was probably horse-riding up a precarious mountain pass in Chile. Amazing views, with the sun going down.

How do you write each novel – i.e. do you block out the narrative first, take each page at a time, create the central character, build a cast of characters? I just dive on into it, like a bulldozer rampaging through a shopping mall, leaving a trail of chaos in my wake, and making most of it up as I go along. This entails a huge amount of rewriting, and throwing away of surplus material, but I find it preferable to working to a rigid plan. My characters need to grow organically through their interactions with other people in the story – they don't have any reality for me until I'm at least halfway into the project.

What is a typical writing day? Get up. Have breakfast. Check email and surf the web. Aim to get a good chunk of work done by lunchtime – say a thousand words. Two to three thousand a day is my usual target. I usually break the afternoon up by going for a run or a swim. Drink vast amounts of coffee. After years of doing all my work in the evenings, I really like having them back now – although I'll often write just because I feel like it. I also tend to be a tiny bit more creative in the evening, for some reason.

What do you do when you are not writing? How do you relax? What are your hobbies? I do some sports: running, swimming, cycling and a bit of horse-riding. My partner and I watch a lot of films, in the cinema and on DVD. I like scratchy British black-and-white films, mainly. I'm also a great fan of anything to do with trains. I'm an anorak, basically, but at 38 I've long stopped caring.

Have you started your next book? Can you tell us a little bit about it? I've made a tentative start on something, which may or may not become the next book. It's a far-future, hard-SF space opera, with lots of interacting alien cultures. The main characters are people from near our own time, catapulted into the distant future. I have every intention of doing another book in the Revelation Space universe, but it won't be the next one.

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Book Info

Publication date

20th February 2012

Author

Alastair Reynolds

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Author's Website

voxish.tripod.com/

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Publisher

Orion (an Imprint of The Orion Publishing Group Ltd ) an imprint of Orion Publishing Co

Format

Paperback

Categories

Science Fiction
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ISBN

9781409138457

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