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P A L Vine - Author

About the Author

Books by P A L Vine

The Wey & Arun Junction Canal

The Wey & Arun Junction Canal

Author: P A L Vine Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/01/2020

Largely as a result of substantial investment by the 3rd Earl of Egremont, a keen patron of the arts and perhaps the richest man in Britain at the time, the Wey & Arun Junction Canal opened in 1816. To contemporary commentators, it seemed set for success as part of a new navigable route from London to Portsmouth and the Sussex coast. Sadly, though the countryside remained `beautiful and picturesque', the canal, after fifty-five years of modest trading, fell victim to competition from railways and problems with its own water supply. The order for closure came in 1871, and for the best part of a century the Wey & Arun lay abandoned. The derelict state of the canal as it lingered forgotten and crumbling, as well as the attempts being made since 1970 to reinstate it, are vividly evoked here by illustrations from the author's collection and those of the Wey & Arun Canal Trust.

Around Pulborough

Around Pulborough

Author: P A L Vine Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/07/2019

Around Pulborough

London's Lost Route to Portsmouth

London's Lost Route to Portsmouth

Author: P A L Vine Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/09/2008

The Portsmouth and Arundel Canal was an extraordinary speculation and an ignominious failure. Planned to complete the inland navigation between London and Portsmouth Harbour, the waterway was part barge canal, part ship canal and part open water when it opened in 1823. The navigation company suffered from poor management and lack of financial control. Contractors' accounts were left unpaid, resulting in their refusal to carry out repairs. From the Thames to Portsmouth was 115 miles and involved the passage of 52 locks. Only when there was sufficient water available could the voyage be made in less than five days. London merchants, frustrated by the need to pay tolls to six different Navigations, continued to prefer the coastal route. Nevertheless, between 1824 and 1838 barges carried many tons of bullion from Portsmouth to the Bank of England. The Chichester Ship Canal alone proved successful, and although it closed in the early 20th century, there are plans to re-open that section to Chichester Harbour for pleasure craft. This new book will receive a warm welcome from canal and waterway students everywhere and from local historians in Sussex and Hampshire.

London's Lost Route To Portsmouth (paperback)

London's Lost Route To Portsmouth (paperback)

Author: P A L Vine Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/01/2007

The Portsmouth & Arundel canal was an extraordinary speculation and an ignominious failure. Planned to complete the inland navigation between London and Portsmouth Harbour, the construction of the waterway was strongly supported by William Huskisson, M.P., and the 3rd Earl of Egremont. Built to safeguard coastal shipping from French privateers and the hazards of the Foreland passage, the outcome of Waterloo and the development of steam vessels transformed its prospects. When it opened, in 1823, it was part barge canal, part ship canal and part open water over which barges had to rely on a primitive steam tug and a favourable tide. The navigation company suffered from poor management and lack of financial control. The contractors' accounts were queried and left unpaid, resulting in their refusal to carry out repairs. The Portsea Ship Canal had to be abandoned almost as soon as it opened, because it leaked, and there was no money to put it right. From the Thames to Portsmouth was 115 miles and involved the passage of 52 locks. Only when there was sufficient water available and there were neither floods nor ice could the voyage be made in less than five days. But the London merchants, frustrated by the need to pay tolls to six different Navigations, continued to prefer the coastal route. Nevertheless, between 1824 and 1838 barges, escorted by Redcoats, carried many tons of bullion from Portsmouth to the Bank of England. Only the Chichester Ship Canal proved successful, but it had to be closed in the early 20th century. Today, plans are in hand for that section to be re-opened to Chichester Harbour for pleasure craft, whilst the Sussex Industrial Archaeology Society are making strenuous efforts to uncover the remains of the barge canal.

Wey and Arun Junction Canal

Wey and Arun Junction Canal

Author: P A L Vine Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/11/1999

This book is part of the Images of England series, which uses old photographs and archived images to show the history of various local areas in England, through their streets, shops, pubs, and people.

Pleasure Boating in the Victorian Era

Pleasure Boating in the Victorian Era

Author: P. A. L. Vine Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/01/1983