Catherine Hall - Author

About the Author

Catherine Hall was born in the Lake District in 1973. She worked in documentary film production before becoming a freelance writer and editor for a range of charities specialising in human rights and development. Her first novel was Days of Grace (Portobello, 2008).

 

Author Photo © Beth Crosland

Featured books by Catherine Hall

The Repercussions

The Repercussions

Author: Catherine Hall Format: Paperback Release Date: 15/04/2015

When war photographer Jo returns from her latest assignment in Afghanistan and moves into the Brighton flat she's just inherited, she hopes to restore equilibrium to her chaotic life. But images and events of her recent past and the reading of her great-grandmother Elizabeth's diary haunt her night and day, forcing Jo to come to terms with demons she thought she could leave behind.

The Repercussions

The Repercussions

Author: Catherine Hall Format: Paperback Release Date: 25/09/2014

When war photographer Jo returns from her latest assignment in Afghanistan and moves into the Brighton flat she's just inherited, she hopes to restore equilibrium to her chaotic life. But images and events of her recent past and the reading of her great-grandmother Elizabeth's diary haunt her night and day, forcing Jo to come to terms with demons she thought she could leave behind.

Other books by Catherine Hall

The Repercussions

The Repercussions

Author: Catherine Hall Format: Paperback Release Date: 15/04/2015

When war photographer Jo returns from her latest assignment in Afghanistan and moves into the Brighton flat she's just inherited, she hopes to restore equilibrium to her chaotic life. But images and events of her recent past and the reading of her great-grandmother Elizabeth's diary haunt her night and day, forcing Jo to come to terms with demons she thought she could leave behind.

Emancipation and the Remaking of the British Imperial World

Emancipation and the Remaking of the British Imperial World

Author: Catherine Hall Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/08/2014

Slavery and the slavery business have cast a long shadow over British history. In 1833, abolition was heralded as evidence of Britain's claim to be the modern global power. Yet much is still unknown about the significance of the slavery business and emancipation in the formation of modern imperial Britain. This book engages with current work exploring the importance of slavery and slave-ownership in the re-making of the British imperial world after abolition in 1833. The contributors to this collection, drawn from Britain, the Caribbean and Mauritius, include some of the most distinguished writers in the field: Clare Anderson, Robin Blackburn, Heather Cateau, Mary Chamberlain, Chris Evans, Pat Hudson, Richard Huzzey, Zoe Laidlaw, Alison Light, Anita Rupprecht, Verene A. Shepherd, Andrea Stuart and Vijaya Teelock. The impact of slavery and slave-ownership is once again becoming a major area of historical and contemporary concern: this book makes a vital contribution to the subject. -- .

Macaulay and Son

Macaulay and Son

Author: Catherine Hall Format: eBook Release Date: 14/09/2012

Thomas Babington Macaulay's History of England was a phenomenal Victorian best-seller which shaped much more than the literary culture of the times: it defined a nation's sense of self, charting the rise of the British Isles to its triumph as a homogenous nation, a safeguard of the freedom of belief and expression, and a central world power. In this book Catherine Hall explores the emotional, intellectual, and political roots of Thomas Macaulay's vision of England, tracing the influence of his father's career as a colonial governor and drawing illuminating comparisons between the two men.

Macaulay and Son Architects of Imperial Britain

Macaulay and Son Architects of Imperial Britain

Author: Catherine Hall Format: Hardback Release Date: 04/09/2012

Thomas Babington Macaulay's History of England was a phenomenal Victorian best-seller defining a nation's sense of self, its triumphant rise to a powerfully homogenous nation built on a global empire and its claim to be the modern nation, marking the route to civilization for all others. In this book Catherine Hall explores the emotional, intellectual, and political roots of Zachary Macaulay, the leading abolitionist, and his son Thomas's visions of race, nation, and empire. The contrasting moments of evangelical humanitarianism and liberal imperialism are read through the writings and careers of the two men.

Race, Nation and Empire Making Histories, 1750 to the Present

Race, Nation and Empire Making Histories, 1750 to the Present

Author: Catherine Hall Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/07/2010

The essays in this collection show how histories written in the past, in different political times, dealt with, considered, or avoided and disavowed Britain's imperial role and issues of difference. Ranging from enlightenment historians to the present, these essays consider both individual historians, including such key figures as E. A. Freeman, G. M. Trevelyan and Keith Hancock, and also broader themes such as the relationship between liberalism, race and historiography and how we might re-think British history in the light of trans-national, trans-imperial and cross-cultural analysis. 'Britishness' and what 'British' history is have become major cultural and political issues in our time. But as these essays demonstrate, there is no single national story: race, empire and difference have pulsed through the writing of British history. The contributors include some of the most distinguished historians writing today: C. A. Bayly, Antoinette Burton, Saul Dubow, Geoff Eley, Theodore Koditschek, Marilyn Lake, John M. MacKenzie, Karen O'Brien, Sonya O. Rose, Bill Schwarz, Kathleen Wilson. -- .

Days of Grace

Days of Grace

Author: Catherine Hall Format: Paperback Release Date: 28/01/2010

My memories of Grace never added up to how she really was. She was always impossible to pin down, dancing just out of my reach, exactly as she did when she was alive. Nora was a girl of twelve when the war broke out and she was forced to join the train-loads of evacuees leaving London's East End for rural Kent. Her surrogate family, the Rivers family, are unlike anyone she has met before and she soon comes to love her new life with them, and in particular with twelve-year old Grace. Over the next few years, as the dog-fights rage ever more fiercely over head and it becomes clear that the Rivers marriage contains deep and irreparable cracks, Nora and Grace grow as close as sisters - though, to Nora's confusion, even this is not quite as close as she would like - What happened next is a secret that will gnaw away at Nora for the rest of her life - a secret that she can only begin to tell when she is certain that she is approaching the end.

White, Male and Middle Class Explorations in Feminism and History

White, Male and Middle Class Explorations in Feminism and History

Author: Catherine Hall Format: Paperback Release Date: 02/05/2002

First Published in 1992. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Civilising Subjects Metropole and Colony in the English Imagination 1830 - 1867

Civilising Subjects Metropole and Colony in the English Imagination 1830 - 1867

Author: Catherine Hall Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/04/2002

Winner of the Morris D. Forkasch prize for the best book in British history 2002 Civilising Subjects argues that the empire was at the heart of nineteenth--century Englishness. English men and women in the mid--nineteenth century imagined themselves at the centre of a great empire: their mental and emotional maps encompassed a Aboriginesa in Australia, a negroesa in Jamaica, a cooliesa in the Indies. This sense of the other provided boundaries and markers of difference: ways of knowing who was a civiliseda and who was a savagea . This fascinating book tells intertwined stories of a particular group of Englishmen and women who constructed themselves as colonisers. Hall then uses these studies as a means of exploring wider colonial and cultural issues. One story focuses on the Baptist missionaries in Jamaica and their efforts to build a new society in the wake of emancipation. Their hope was to make Afro--Jamaican men and women into people like themselves. Disillusionment followed as it emerged that the making of a new selvesa was not as simple as they had thought, and that black men and women had minds and cultural resources of their own. The second story tells the tale of a the midland metropolisa , Birmingham, and the ways in which its culture was infused with empire. Abolitionist enthusiasm dominated the town in the 1830s but by the 1860s the identity of a friend of the negroa had been superseded by a harsher racial vocabulary. Birminghama s a manly citizensa imagined the non--white subjects of empire as different kinds of men from themselves. These two detailed studies, of Birmingham and Jamaica, are set within their wider context: the making of metropole and colony and of coloniser and colonised. The result is an absorbing study of the a racinga of Englishness, which will be invaluable for students and scholars of British imperial and cultural history.

Civilising Subjects Metropole and Colony in the English Imagination 1830 - 1867

Civilising Subjects Metropole and Colony in the English Imagination 1830 - 1867

Author: Catherine Hall Format: Paperback Release Date: 05/04/2002

Winner of the Morris D. Forkasch prize for the best book in British history 2002 Civilising Subjects argues that the empire was at the heart of nineteenth-century Englishness. English men and women in the mid-nineteenth century imagined themselves at the centre of a great empire: their mental and emotional maps encompassed 'Aborigines' in Australia, 'negroes' in Jamaica, 'coolies' in the Indies. This sense of the other provided boundaries and markers of difference: ways of knowing who was 'civilised' and who was 'savage'. This fascinating book tells intertwined stories of a particular group of Englishmen and women who constructed themselves as colonisers. Hall then uses these studies as a means of exploring wider colonial and cultural issues. One story focuses on the Baptist missionaries in Jamaica and their efforts to build a new society in the wake of emancipation. Their hope was to make Afro-Jamaican men and women into people like themselves. Disillusionment followed as it emerged that the making of 'new selves' was not as simple as they had thought, and that black men and women had minds and cultural resources of their own. The second story tells the tale of 'the midland metropolis', Birmingham, and the ways in which its culture was infused with empire. Abolitionist enthusiasm dominated the town in the 1830s but by the 1860s the identity of 'friend of the negro' had been superseded by a harsher racial vocabulary. Birmingham's 'manly citizens' imagined the non-white subjects of empire as different kinds of men from themselves. These two detailed studies, of Birmingham and Jamaica, are set within their wider context: the making of metropole and colony and of coloniser and colonised. The result is an absorbing study of the 'racing' of Englishness, which will be invaluable for students and scholars of British imperial and cultural history.

White, Male and Middle Class Explorations in Feminism and History

White, Male and Middle Class Explorations in Feminism and History

Author: Catherine Hall Format: Paperback Release Date: 28/05/1992

What are the relations between feminism and history, feminist politics and historical practice? What are the connections between gender and class? What part have racial identities and ethnic difference played in the construction of Englishness? Through a series of provocative and richly detailed essays, Catherine Hall explores these questions. She argues that feminism has opened up vital new questions for history and transformed familiar historical narratives. Class can no longer be understood outside of gender, or gender outside of class. But English identities have also been rooted in imperial power. White, Male and Middle Class explores the ways in which middle--class masculinities were rooted in conceptions of power over dependants -- whether black or female.

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