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Audiobooks Narrated by Daniel Houle

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LoveReading Top 10

  1. Troy: Our Greatest Story Retold Audiobook Troy: Our Greatest Story Retold
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  2. A Christmas to Remember: The enchanting new novel from Sunday Times bestselling author Anton Du Beke Audiobook A Christmas to Remember: The enchanting new novel from Sunday Times bestselling author Anton Du Beke
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  3. A Del of a Life: The hilarious new memoir from the national treasure Audiobook A Del of a Life: The hilarious new memoir from the national treasure
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  4. Hungry: The Highly Anticipated Memoir from One of the Greatest Food Writers of All Time Audiobook Hungry: The Highly Anticipated Memoir from One of the Greatest Food Writers of All Time
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  5. I Wish It Could Be Christmas Every Day Audiobook I Wish It Could Be Christmas Every Day
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  6. Ghosts Audiobook Ghosts
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  7. Rag-and-Bone Christmas Audiobook Rag-and-Bone Christmas
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  8. 19th Christmas: (Women's Murder Club 19) Audiobook 19th Christmas: (Women's Murder Club 19)
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  9. Why Mummy’s Sloshed: The Bigger the Kids, the Bigger the Drink Audiobook Why Mummy’s Sloshed: The Bigger the Kids, the Bigger the Drink
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  10. Tomorrow Will Be A Good Day: My Autobiography Audiobook Tomorrow Will Be A Good Day: My Autobiography
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Albigensian Crusade, The: The History and Legacy of the Catholic Campaign against the Cathars in Fra Audiobook

Albigensian Crusade, The: The History and Legacy of the Catholic Campaign against the Cathars in Fra

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Daniel Houle Release Date: October 2020

After the fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century, when Western Europe was governed by a Germanic warrior-caste, the theory of a just and virtuous war took root. The Roman Church enhanced its authority by sanctifying oaths taken for just military purposes, and Bishop Anselm of Lucca (d. 1086) was the first to suggest that military action for the cause of religion could remit sin. At the Council of Clermont in July 1095, Pope Urban II canonized religious war by urging Western Europe's nobility to take up arms in defense of the Byzantine Empire against the Muslims, thus launching the Crusades. Religious military orders such as the Knights of Saint John, the Templars, and the Hospitallers arose, ostensibly founded to protect the weak and the sick but also to extend the boundaries of Christianity and the power of the Church. In Europe, the knight, originally a mounted warrior, became a consecrated soldier of Christ, dedicated to the defense of the Church by solemn vows made before an altar. It was not long before the concept of the holy crusade was applied beyond the holy land. The conflict between the Christian states and the Muslim Moors in the Iberian Peninsula became a holy war, as did the forced settlement of Pagan Slav lands on Germany's eastern frontier. At the beginning of the 13th century, the Knights Hospitaller and the Knights of Livonia began the conquest of heathen Baltic lands while Sweden invaded Finland. Naturally, the question remained concerning the use of arms against other Christians. Eastern Christians did not acknowledge the Pope's supremacy, and many held that it was lawful for him to declare a crusade to bring schismatics back to the obedience of Rome. When the “heresy” of Catharism began to take root in southeastern France toward the end of the 12th century, both Church and State considered the use of force to extirpate it.

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What if Carthage Won the Punic Wars? An Alternative History of the Conflict Between Rome and Carthag Audiobook

What if Carthage Won the Punic Wars? An Alternative History of the Conflict Between Rome and Carthag

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Daniel Houle Release Date: September 2020

The Punic Wars spanned more than a century, brought the loss of approximately 400,000 lives, and eventually led to the utter defeat and destruction of Carthage, but it was no easy victory for Rome, and on several occasions the young Roman Republic was close to annihilation. Given what happened in the wake of the Punic Wars, historians have long been left to ponder what might have happened had the Carthaginians won, especially given how close Hannibal came to accomplishing such a victory against Rome during the Second Punic War. What if Carthage Won the Punic Wars? An Alternative History of the Conflict Between Rome and Carthage profiles the conflict and examines how events may have gone quite differently for Europe if Rome had been defeated. 

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Haitian Revolution, The: The History and Legacy of the Slave Uprising that Led to Haiti’s Independen Audiobook

Haitian Revolution, The: The History and Legacy of the Slave Uprising that Led to Haiti’s Independen

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Daniel Houle Release Date: September 2020

Hispaniola entered the European record in 1492 when Christopher Columbus made landfall on its southern shore during his first trans-Atlantic voyage, and he named his discovery in honor of the Spanish Crown that had funded and sponsored the voyage. Leaving the crew of the wrecked Santa Maria on the island, he returned to Europe, leaving his men to establish the foundations of the settlement of La Navidad and the first beachhead of the European seizure of the Caribbean and the New World. Columbus would revisit the island three times, leading a vanguard of pioneer colonists to commence the exploitation of the New World. The indigenous people of Hispaniola, the Tainos and Arawak, initially greeted the landing with ambivalence, but as more and more of them were enslaved, and as their country was occupied, they entered a period of precipitous decline. Through a combination of disease, the violence associated with enslavement and general assimilation, they had virtually disappeared from the landscape within a century. Meanwhile, as the Spanish colonists looked around them, searching for a means to exploit this great discovery, and as the occupation spread to the mainland and the interior of South America, the early search for minerals yielded to the establishment of a plantation economy, with an emphasis initially on sugar, and later cotton, coffee, indigo and other crops.  Thus, even by the 16th century, slaves were being imported to Hispaniola, and over the next few centuries, the population of African slaves came to represent a sizable majority of the population there. This would set the stage for one of history’s most unique revolutions. 

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Domestication of Cats, The: The History of the Only Domesticated Felidae Species and Their Relations Audiobook

Domestication of Cats, The: The History of the Only Domesticated Felidae Species and Their Relations

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Daniel Houle Release Date: September 2020

Mankind's obsession with felines is an enigma in and of itself. Unlike dogs, famously known as man's most excitable, trustworthy, and loyal friend, cats are oftentimes indifferent, guarded, and yet finicky little furry creatures who only yearn for attention and affection when one is neck-deep in work or otherwise preoccupied. And still, people adore them all the same. In a recent poll that surveyed 600 American college students, 60% of the participants identified themselves as “dog lovers,” whereas only 11% pledged their love for cats. The remaining 29% regarded themselves as fans of both critters or fans of neither. Be that as it may, there is said to be anywhere between a staggering 88=94 million pet cats in the United States alone, which eclipses the roughly 84-90 million pet dogs in the country. In the same breath, while more households around the world share a roof with a canine companion, as reflected in the results of this particular survey and most other similar polls, more cat owners have taken it upon themselves to look after more than one pet. This just goes to show that the passion that cat lovers have for their feline friends is evidently comparable with, if not arguably greater than that of dog lovers as a whole.  The Domestication of Cats: The History of the Only Domesticated Felidae Species and Their Relationship with Humans examines the origins of this exceptional bond, including scientific and mythical theories, and explores how cats were domesticated. 

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Krishna: The History and Legacy of the Popular Hindu Deity Audiobook

Krishna: The History and Legacy of the Popular Hindu Deity

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Daniel Houle Release Date: September 2020

Hinduism as a religion spans more than 3,000 years, and now it includes nearly 1 billion people. At the same time, it is not a specific term, since there are clear sectarian boundaries, the same way there are differences between Protestantism and Catholicism, and even differences between the various Protestant sects and the various Catholic sects, Hinduism may be broken down into many major sub-groupings that may or may not have much in common at all. Additionally, in the same way Christianity contains many smaller, spirituality heterodox groups like Gnostic Christianity (which are sometimes called cults), Hinduism also contains many groups that have beliefs that do not fit easily within the common corpus of Hindu belief systems. All of these divisions came well after the time of the Aryans, and Hinduism likely began to divide around the 1st century CE, about 1,000 years after the arrival of the Aryans into the Indian subcontinent. Sri Krishna, believed to be the eighth incarnation of Vishnu, is without question one of the most popular and instantly recognizable deities within the Hindu pantheon, which encompasses hundreds of Puranic divine beings, coupled with approximately 33 Vedic gods and goddesses or “devas,” and a sea of other lower-ranking demigods and legendary figures. The likeness of the blue-skinned, flute-toting god, blessed with an unspeakably beautiful face and midnight-black curls, has been replicated in countless sculptures, often clad in colorful clothes and adorned with gold and silver jewelry, relief carvings, paintings, and other artistic mediums, otherwise known as “murti.” Hindus and subscribers of the Bhagavad Gita, as well as practitioners of bhakti yoga, ashtanga yoga, jñana yoga, and karma yoga are intimately familiar with this god of unconditional love, compassion, and tenderness, who has also been crowned “Yogesvara,” the master of yogis and all things mystical.

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Wall Street Bombing of 1920, The: The History and Legacy of the Notorious Anarchist Attack on New Yo Audiobook

Wall Street Bombing of 1920, The: The History and Legacy of the Notorious Anarchist Attack on New Yo

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Daniel Houle Release Date: August 2020

One September day, New York City suffered a devastating act of domestic terrorism, but that day was not the 11th, and the attack took place over 80 years before the most notorious terrorist attack on America. In 1920, an explosion in the Financial District of New York City killed 38 people, injured hundreds more, and caused damage that is still visible on some of Wall Street’s most famous buildings today. Although the attack has largely been forgotten, in terms of casualties, it was the worst act of terrorism in the United States until the bombing in Oklahoma City conducted by Timothy McVeigh in 1995. The investigation into the bombing involved 10 government agencies and extended across the world, yet after three years of intensive work, investigators were finally forced to admit that they had no idea who had planted the bomb. Subsequent investigations have uncovered many suspects, but no one was ever charged with offenses related to the explosion, even as suspicions have always fallen on anarchists, political activists who sought revolutionary change.  In America, which had large immigrant communities, these movements gained increasing numbers of followers, so when a bomb exploded on Wall Street, the heart of the American financial system, it was perhaps natural that suspicions immediately fell on anarchist movements. Was this an attempt to destabilize capitalism in America or even to assassinate leading figures in the financial world? Finding clear answers to those questions proved beyond the capacity of the agencies tasked with investigating the bombing. Even now, there is no certain answer as to who planted the Wall Street bomb, but it has long been attributed to anarchists. 

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Denisovans, The: The History of the Extinct Archaic Humans Who Spread Across Asia during the Paleoli Audiobook

Denisovans, The: The History of the Extinct Archaic Humans Who Spread Across Asia during the Paleoli

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Daniel Houle Release Date: August 2020

The study of paleoanthropology is the branch of anthropology that examines the development of humans and pre-humans, often called collectively hominins, through history. Although paleoanthropology is directly concerned with human history, it diverges from traditional historical studies in that historians use historical records as their primary sources to reconstruct history, while paleoanthropologists work with bones and other artifacts hominins left as their records. Historians deal with the last 5,000 years of human history, while paleoanthropologists go back more than four million years to when the first proto-humans walked the Earth. Although the subject of paleoanthropology covers a much longer chronology than historical studies, the study itself is actually fairly new. As soon as man discovered writing, he began engaging in historiography (historical writing and philosophy), but paleoanthropology only really began in the late 1800s. As archaeologists began finding bones in European caves of a human race that was very different than any race in the modern world, the study of paleoanthropology was born. However, the results of the DNA testing dramatically changed the course of paleoanthropology once more when it was revealed that although the hominins from what is known as the Denisova Cave were closely related to Neanderthals, much more so than modern humans are related to Neanderthals, they represented a distinct species of humans. Scholars began examining this new hominin race – which became known as “Denisovans,” “Denisovan Man,” or Homo denisovan – for connections to the Neanderthals and modern humans. Although it has been less than 10 years since the Denisovans were truly discovered, much has been learned about them, particularly about their interactions with the Neanderthals and modern humans, their range, and their culture.

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Scotch-Irish, The: The History and Legacy of the Ethnic Group in America Audiobook

Scotch-Irish, The: The History and Legacy of the Ethnic Group in America

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Daniel Houle Release Date: August 2020

“Scotch-Irish” is an American term that became popular in the latter 1800s, referring to the largely Protestant immigrants to the United States originating in the northern Irish province of Ulster. The majority of Scotch-Irish were people intentionally settled in Ulster as a counter to the native Catholic Irish, who immigrated to Ulster from the lowlands of Scotland and the borderlands between England and Scotland. The Ulster settlers were a solution to depopulation caused by the wars in Ireland, and it was hoped that the Protestant settlers would counterbalance the habitually rebellious Catholic Irish. The regions they came from had a history of violence and poverty. The heritage of violence was thought to have prepared them for withstanding Irish disorder, and poverty made migration to Ulster an attractive proposition. They were deliberately selected by various proprietors, landowners, and King James (1601-1623). The large number of Ulster immigrants to British American colonies in the 1700s were usually simply called “Irish,” but modern historians prefer the term Scots-Irish, on the grounds that “Scotch” refers to whiskey. This is unnecessarily pedantic, not to mention that Scotch-Irish is deeply embedded in the history books and in American tradition. During the colonial era, it is estimated that some 200,000 Scotch-Irish migrated to the mainland colonies. How many may have migrated to Canada (British after 1763) or various Caribbean colonies is not well-known. The colonies, particularly Pennsylvania, attracted the Scotch-Irish for several reasons, the most important of which was the ready availability of farmable land, but also, there was no established church (the official and politically dominant religion in Ireland was the Church of England) that discriminated against dissenters such as the Presbyterians.

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Black Bart: The Life and Legacy of the Wild West’s Most Notorious Gentleman Bandit Audiobook

Black Bart: The Life and Legacy of the Wild West’s Most Notorious Gentleman Bandit

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Daniel Houle Release Date: July 2020

There was no shortage of targets for thieves in the West, and some infamous criminals struck dozens of times. Billy the Kid was rumored to be responsible for 21 deaths, and Jesse James was involved in holding up at least 19 banks, trains, and stagecoaches with his vicious gang, resulting in the deaths of some 20 men. The Sam Bass Gang, captained by another hot-tempered gunslinger and seasoned bandit who terrorized the Midwest, as well as the Lone Star State, carried out what is now remembered as the largest heist in the history of the Union Pacific Railroad, fleeing with $65,000 in gold coin and valuables (equivalent to approximately $1.5 million today). Few could compare to the frightening Felipe Espinosa, the Mexican-American outlaw who killed 32 men in the Colorado Territory in the summer of 1863 alone. Among the outlaws who were known for their gun skills and crimes, a criminal of an entirely different breed emerged – the gentleman bandit. Of them, the most famous is Charles E. Boles, more commonly known by his legendary sobriquet, “Black Bart.” Black Bart reportedly committed at least 28 stagecoach robberies in a span of eight years, but his name never evoked fear or hatred; instead, he was widely respected and even somewhat admired in both criminal and civilian circles. He was, in many ways, unlike any other desperado the Wild West had ever seen, famed for his debonair appearance, his twisted, yet almost commendable sense of morality, and the way he pulled off his crimes, rounded out by his signature calling card, which came in the form of self-penned, poignant poems left behind at crime scenes. In many ways, later outlaws who were in a sense glamorized by the public in the early 20th century, such as Bonnie and Clyde, owed their reputations to the path Black Bart blazed over the course of his criminal career.

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Tony Curtis: The Life and Career of a Hollywood Golden Boy Audiobook

Tony Curtis: The Life and Career of a Hollywood Golden Boy

Author: Phaistos Publishers Narrator: Daniel Houle Release Date: July 2020

“Shining shoes as a boy, shining on-screen as a star, shining even among the blinding bright lights of Las Vegas that became his adopted home, Tony Curtis was never less than a megawatt personality, one that always seemed lit by a childlike glow of wonderment.” Start naming superstars from the enchanted Golden Age of Hollywood, and chances are that Tony Curtis shared a marquee with them—and when it comes to many of the women, he also shared a bed. Cary Grant, Jimmy Stewart, Burt Lancaster? Yup. Marilyn Monroe, Janet Leigh, Natalie Wood? Yup. Kirk Douglas, Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin? Yup. Debbie Reynolds, Yvonne De Carlo…well, you get the idea. Curtis appeared in more than 100 movies, dozens of television series, and on countless talk, variety, and game shows, but despite a prolific career spanning six decades in the ficklest business of all, Curtis could never shake the feeling that he was on the outside looking in. He always had a beautiful woman at his side, but he had trouble committing to one. He mingled with the movers and shakers in the realms of entertainment and politics, but when his phone inevitably stopped ringing, he fell hard into drug and alcohol abuse. He fathered six children, but when his end neared, he bequeathed them nothing. This book profiles how Curtis climbed from the darkest depths of poverty, reached Hollywood’s dizzying heights of fame and fortune, and clung to his pedestal through five marriages, drug, alcohol, and sex addiction, and the tragic death of a son.

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Pyramids of Ancient Egypt, The: The History of Antiquity’s Most Famous Monuments Audiobook

Pyramids of Ancient Egypt, The: The History of Antiquity’s Most Famous Monuments

Author: Phaistos Publishers Narrator: Daniel Houle Release Date: July 2020

In addition to being one of the Ancient Wonders of the World, the Great Pyramid of Giza is extraordinary for a number of reasons. It is one of the greatest feats of engineering in the ancient world, to the extent that it remained the tallest built structure in the world from the time it was finished up until the Lincoln Cathedral was completed around 1300 CE. The fact the nearly 520 feet tall spire of the cathedral was erected nearly 3,800 years after the Great Pyramid of Giza was constructed, a testament in its own way to the longevity of the pyramid itself. Even since then, it remains a monument that has stood the test of time, remaining the only one of the original seven wonders still surviving. Archaeologists have estimated that when completed, the Great Pyramid stood 480 feet tall, with each side measuring 756 feet in length, with a total mass estimated at being 5.9 million tons and a volume of approximately 2.5 million cubic meters. The Great Pyramid is only one of many pyramids at Giza, and people still associate Egypt with pyramids due to these massive monuments, but many are unaware of the long tradition of pyramid building within Egypt. There are many more pyramids in Egypt than just those at Giza - Lepsius’ expedition listed 67 “pyramids” throughout Egypt, all listed in his Denkmäler aus Aegypten und Aethiopien. Some of these monuments have since been relabeled as mastabas or other monuments, but many represented initial attempts at building pyramids by some of Egypt’s earliest kings, offering testament to the fact that the Egyptians spent several centuries trying to master the process of building such majestic monuments.

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History for Kids: The History of Saber-Toothed Tigers Audiobook

History for Kids: The History of Saber-Toothed Tigers

Author: Charles River Editors Narrator: Daniel Houle Release Date: July 2020

Imagine a feline with the spirit of a lion, the sneakiness of a puma, the terrifying walk of a black bear, and the strong arms of a gorilla. Sounds cool? Now add some huge dagger-like fangs… even cooler, right? This amazing creature was best known as the saber-toothed tiger; an animal so fearless, he could beat beasts even twice their size!  As cool as he sounds, this Ice Age feline earned quite a villainous reputation; you can even see them be the bad guys in movies! Ever watched the movie Ice Age? All saber-toothed tigers, except Diego, seemed to be dangerous; or do you remember Wolverine’s enemy, Victor Creed, “Sabertooth”? Yes, he was scary.   Beyond his reputation, this creature is an Ice Age celebrity… So what is it about the Smilodon—that is their scientific name- that makes them so interesting to learn about? How did they live like? And if they were powerful, heartless beasts, why did they stop existing? This book will teach you everything there is to know about these famous cats, from facts and pictures to their fossils and many cool theories. 

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