LoveReading

Becoming a member of the LoveReading community is free.

No catches, no fine print just unadulterated book loving, with your favourite books saved to your own digital bookshelf.

New members get entered into our monthly draw to win £100 to spend in your local bookshop Plus lots lots more…

Find out more

Audiobooks by Margaret MacMillan

Browse audiobooks by Margaret MacMillan, listen to samples and when you're ready head over to Audiobooks.com where you can get 3 FREE audiobooks on us

LoveReading Top 10

  1. Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man Audiobook Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man
    1
  2. The Sin Eater Audiobook The Sin Eater
    2
  3. Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You: A Remix of the National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Be Audiobook Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You: A Remix of the National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Be
    3
  4. Near Dark: A Thriller Audiobook Near Dark: A Thriller
    4
  5. Coming Home to Island House Audiobook Coming Home to Island House
    5
  6. Outsider: A Novel of Suspense Audiobook Outsider: A Novel of Suspense
    6
  7. What You Wish For: A Novel Audiobook What You Wish For: A Novel
    7
  8. The Alchemist Audiobook The Alchemist
    8
  9. Relationship Goals: How to Win at Dating, Marriage, and Sex Audiobook Relationship Goals: How to Win at Dating, Marriage, and Sex
    9
  10. Tempt Me Audiobook Tempt Me
    10
Filter
The War That Ended Peace Audiobook

The War That Ended Peace

Author: Margaret MacMillan Narrator: Richard Burnip Release Date: October 2013

From the bestselling and award-winning author of Paris 1919 comes a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, a fascinating portrait of Europe from 1900 up to the outbreak of World War I. The century since the end of the Napoleonic wars had been the most peaceful era Europe had known since the fall of the Roman Empire. In the first years of the twentieth century, Europe believed it was marching to a golden, happy, and prosperous future. But instead, complex personalities and rivalries, colonialism and ethnic nationalisms, and shifting alliances helped to bring about the failure of the long peace and the outbreak of a war that transformed Europe and the world. The War That Ended Peace brings vividly to life the military leaders, politicians, diplomats, bankers, and the extended, interrelated family of crowned heads across Europe who failed to stop the descent into war: in Germany, the mercurial Kaiser Wilhelm II and the chief of the German general staff, Von Moltke the Younger; in Austria-Hungary, Emperor Franz Joseph, a man who tried, through sheer hard work, to stave off the coming chaos in his empire; in Russia, Tsar Nicholas II and his wife; in Britain, King Edward VII, Prime Minister Herbert Asquith, and British admiral Jacky Fisher, the fierce advocate of naval reform who entered into the arms race with Germany that pushed the continent toward confrontation on land and sea. There are the would-be peacemakers as well, among them prophets of the horrors of future wars whose warnings went unheeded: Alfred Nobel, who donated his fortune to the cause of international understanding, and Bertha von Suttner, a writer and activist who was the first woman awarded Nobel’s new Peace Prize. Here too we meet the urbane and cosmopolitan Count Harry Kessler, who noticed many of the early signs that something was stirring in Europe; the young Winston Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty and a rising figure in British politics; Madame Caillaux, who shot a man who might have been a force for peace; and more. With indelible portraits, MacMillan shows how the fateful decisions of a few powerful people changed the course of history. Taut, suspenseful, and impossible to put down, The War That Ended Peace is also a wise cautionary reminder of how wars happen in spite of the near-universal desire to keep the peace. Destined to become a classic in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman’s The Guns of August, The War That Ended Peace enriches our understanding of one of the defining periods and events of the twentieth century. Advance praise for The War That Ended Peace “[A] richly textured narrative about World War I . . . addressing the war’s build-up . . . MacMillan tells this familiar story with panache. A major contribution, however, is her presentation of its subtext, as Europe’s claims to be the world’s most advanced civilization ‘were being challenged from without and undermined from within.’ . . . MacMillan eloquently shows that ‘turning out the lights’ was not inevitable, but a consequence of years of decisions and reactions: a slow-motion train wreck few wanted but none could avoid.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review) “The War That Ended Peace tells the story of how intelligent, well-meaning leaders guided their nations into catastrophe. These epic events, brilliantly described by one of our era’s most talented historians, warn of the dangers that arise when we fail to anticipate the consequences of our actions. This is one of the finest books I have ever read on the causes of World War I.”—Madeleine Albright, former secretary of state

Show more
Dangerous Games Audiobook

Dangerous Games

Author: Margaret MacMillan Narrator: Barbara Caruso Release Date: October 2009

The author behind the New York Times best-sellers Paris 1919 and Nixon & Mao, Margaret MacMillan presents a remarkable treatise on history's importance.

Show more
Nixon and Mao: The Week That Changed the World Audiobook

Nixon and Mao: The Week That Changed the World

Author: Margaret MacMillan Narrator: Barbara Caruso Release Date: February 2007

With the publication of her landmark bestseller Paris 1919, Margaret MacMillan was praised as "a superb writer who can bring history to life" (The Philadelphia Inquirer). Now she brings her extraordinary gifts to one of the most important subjects today-the relationship between the United States and China-and one of the most significant moments in modern history. In February 1972, Richard Nixon, the first American president ever to visit China, and Mao Tse-tung, the enigmatic Communist dictator, met for an hour in Beijing. Their meeting changed the course of history and ultimately laid the groundwork for the complex relationship between China and the United States that we see today. That monumental meeting in 1972-during what Nixon called "the week that changed the world"-could have been brought about only by powerful leaders: Nixon himself, a great strategist and a flawed human being, and Mao, willful and ruthless. They were assisted by two brilliant and complex statesmen, Henry Kissinger and Chou En-lai. Surrounding them were fascinating people with unusual roles to play, including the enormously disciplined and unhappy Pat Nixon and a small-time Shanghai actress turned monstrous empress, Jiang Qing. And behind all of them lay the complex history of two countries, two great and equally confident civilizations: China, ancient and contemptuous yet fearful of barbarians beyond the Middle Kingdom, and the United States, forward-looking and confident, seeing itself as the beacon for the world. Nixon thought China could help him get out of Vietnam. Mao needed American technology and expertise to repair the damage of the Cultural Revolution. Both men wanted an ally against an aggressive Soviet Union. Did they get what they wanted? Did Mao betray his own revolutionary ideals? How did the people of China react to this apparent change in attitude toward the imperialist Americans? Did Nixon make a mistake in coming to China as a supplicant? And what has been the impact of the visit on the United States ever since? Weaving together fascinating anecdotes and insights, an understanding of Chinese and American history, and the momentous events of an extraordinary time, this brilliantly written book looks at one of the transformative moments of the twentieth century and casts new light on a key relationship for the world of the twenty-first century.

Show more
Six Months That Changed the World: The Paris Peace Conference of 1919 Audiobook

Six Months That Changed the World: The Paris Peace Conference of 1919

Author: Margaret MacMillan Narrator: Margaret MacMillam, Margaret Macmillan Release Date: December 2003

The world will never see another peace conference like the one that took place in Paris in 1919. For six months, the world's major leaders - including Woodrow Wilson, president of the United States, David Lloyd George, prime minister of Great Britain, and Georges Clemenceau, prime minister of France - met to discuss the peace settlements to end World War I. They faced huge issues and, as the weeks went by, their agenda grew. **Contact Customer Service for Additional Material**

Show more
Paris 1919 Audiobook

Paris 1919

Author: Margaret MacMillan Narrator: Suzanne Toren Release Date: July 2003

Winner of the Samuel Johnson Prize, renowned historian Margaret MacMillan's best-selling Paris 1919 is the story of six remarkable months that changed the world. At the close of WWI, between January and July of 1919, delegates from around the world converged on Paris under the auspices of peace. New countries were created, old empires were dissolved, and for six months, Paris was the center of the world. Bringing to vivid life the individuals who participated in the great Peace Conference--including Woodrow Wilson, Winston Churchill, Lawrence of Arabia, and Ho Chi Minh--Paris 1919 is a landmark work of narrative history.

Show more