An Orphan's War Reader Reviews

An Orphan's War

Charlotte Walker

This historical fiction is lovely, easy to get in to and heart-warming.

A nice story about finding love in the darkest of times. Set throughout the Second World War and following the start of Maxine’s career, as a nurse.

An uplifting story set in some of the darkest times in history. As the Second World War starts, Maxine embarks on married life. Loss and turmoil seems to follow Maxine wherever she goes as she works to gain her nursing certificate. The detailed backdrop of The Blitz, blackouts and sirens excellently place this book in time and offers a historically realistic setting without pulling the focus from the main characters.

In a time when life seemed fleeting, it is heart breaking to see everyone Maxine becomes close to get pulled away. It would seem that the odds are against Maxine finding happiness and throughout the book and my heart went out to her. It was great when she finally managed to achieve her dream of working with children. The representation of women in that time is accurate, irritatingly so in places. This isn’t a negative about the book, it is a good plot device for including the struggles and pressures placed on women, and the extra problems these produce for Maxine.

This historical fiction is lovely, easy to get in to and heart-warming.

Lee Ruddin

Green is a talented novelist though the fictional series, only two books in, is fast-becoming stale, predictable even.

After losing husband Johnny in Occupied France, Maxine Grey needs to occupy her mind. With an overbearing mother and imprisoned brother, Max breaks free of the family shackles to start a nursing career in London. Despite a natural flair, she returns to Liverpool harbouring a secret after catching the eye of a flirtatious surgeon. Bereaved and burdened, she finds solace helping those in need at a Dr Barnardo’s orphanage. But how long before her past catches up?

Allowing contemporary thinking to infiltrate war-time characters gives the impression limited research has been conducted which is regretful when, in this instance, scholarly investigation into orphanages ensure protagonists are more rounded and deeper than they otherwise might be; peripheral ones nonetheless remain one-dimensional and shallow. Although meat was rationed during the war, the author serves up a feast of period-rich detail regarding the dishes children were served and what off-duty staff endured if not enjoyed. The same cannot be said about Blitz-hit Liverpool, however, since there is little sense of place notwithstanding Green’s belated visit.

While An Orphan’s War can be read standalone, readers are directed to An Orphan in the Snow because it introduces Bingham Hall and the trials and tribulations – if less so twists – therein. Green is a talented novelist though the fictional series, only two books in, is fast-becoming stale, predictable even. Let us hope the third – An Orphan’s Wish – is a page-turner given there is currently little danger of disloyalty from the readerships of Katie Flynn and Maureen Lee.

Book Information

ISBN: 9780008238971
Publication date: 3rd May 2018
Author: Molly Green
Publisher: AVON, a division of HarperCollins Publishers Ltd an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers
Format: Paperback
Pagination: 432 pages
Genres: eBook Favourites, Historical Fiction, Sagas and Romance, Free Prize Draws,
Categories: Sagas, Historical romance,