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Robert Garland - Author

About the Author

Books by Robert Garland

Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar

Author: Robert Garland Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/10/2018

Julius Caesar was, as this book maintains, quite simply the most famous Roman who ever lived. His influence endures to the present day: in our 'Julian' calendar of 365.25 days, which he introduced; in the geographical entity we call France, whose boundaries he established; and, thanks to his 'invasion' of 55 BCE, his is virtually the earliest familiar name in the history of Britain. This introductory book seeks to explore the many facets of his complex character - his vanity and his vitality, his charisma and his cruelty. It seeks to set his astounding career and accomplishments against the background of late republican Rome, so enabling the reader to understand not only Caesar himself but also the violent and destructive world in which he grew up. It traces in detail the sources of his phenomenal rise to power and the deep unpopularity which ultimately made him 'one of the loneliest men alive'. Garland pays particular attention to the day of Caesar's death, which can, like no other day of the ancient world, be re-constructed on an almost hour-by-hour basis. Caesar's powerful legacy is also examined, as is his 'reception' in European thought and culture from antiquity to the present day in a variety of media, including epic poetry, drama, fiction and film. The book includes a guide to further reading.

Wandering Greeks The Ancient Greek Diaspora from the Age of Homer to the Death of Alexander the Great

Wandering Greeks The Ancient Greek Diaspora from the Age of Homer to the Death of Alexander the Great

Author: Robert Garland Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 13/09/2016

Most classical authors and modern historians depict the ancient Greek world as essentially stable and even static, once the so-called colonization movement came to an end. But Robert Garland argues that the Greeks were highly mobile, that their movement was essential to the survival, success, and sheer sustainability of their society, and that this wandering became a defining characteristic of their culture. Addressing a neglected but essential subject, Wandering Greeks focuses on the diaspora of tens of thousands of people between about 700 and 325 BCE, demonstrating the degree to which Greeks were liable to be forced to leave their homes due to political upheaval, oppression, poverty, warfare, or simply a desire to better themselves. Attempting to enter into the mind-set of these wanderers, the book provides an insightful and sympathetic account of what it meant for ancient Greeks to part from everyone and everything they held dear, to start a new life elsewhere--or even to become homeless, living on the open road or on the high seas with no end to their journey in sight. Each chapter identifies a specific kind of wanderer, including the overseas settler, the deportee, the evacuee, the asylum-seeker, the fugitive, the economic migrant, and the itinerant, and the book also addresses repatriation and the idea of the portable polis. The result is a vivid and unique portrait of ancient Greece as a culture of displaced persons.

Wandering Greeks The Ancient Greek Diaspora from the Age of Homer to the Death of Alexander the Great

Wandering Greeks The Ancient Greek Diaspora from the Age of Homer to the Death of Alexander the Great

Author: Robert Garland Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/07/2014

Most classical authors and modern historians depict the ancient Greek world as essentially stable and even static, once the so-called colonization movement came to an end. But Robert Garland argues that the Greeks were highly mobile, that their movement was essential to the survival, success, and sheer sustainability of their society, and that this wandering became a defining characteristic of their culture. Addressing a neglected but essential subject, Wandering Greeks focuses on the diaspora of tens of thousands of people between about 700 and 325 BCE, demonstrating the degree to which Greeks were liable to be forced to leave their homes due to political upheaval, oppression, poverty, warfare, or simply a desire to better themselves. Attempting to enter into the mind-set of these wanderers, the book provides an insightful and sympathetic account of what it meant for ancient Greeks to part from everyone and everything they held dear, to start a new life elsewhere--or even to become homeless, living on the open road or on the high seas with no end to their journey in sight. Each chapter identifies a specific kind of wanderer, including the overseas settler, the deportee, the evacuee, the asylum-seeker, the fugitive, the economic migrant, and the itinerant, and the book also addresses repatriation and the idea of the portable polis. The result is a vivid and unique portrait of ancient Greece as a culture of displaced persons.

Daily Life of the Ancient Greeks

Daily Life of the Ancient Greeks

Author: Robert Garland Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/03/2014

Significantly expanded and updated in light of the most recent scholarship, the second edition of Garland's engaging introduction to ancient Greek society brings this world vividly to life--and, in doing so, explores the perspectives and morals of typical ancient Greek citizens across a wide range of societal levels. Food and drink, literacy, the plight of the elderly, the treatment of slaves, and many more aspects of daily life in ancient Greece also come into sharp focus. More than sixty illustrations are included, as are maps, a chronology, a glossary of Greek terms, and suggestions for further reading.

Ancient Greece Everyday Life in the Birthplace of Western Civilization

Ancient Greece Everyday Life in the Birthplace of Western Civilization

Author: Robert Garland Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/10/2013

Ancient Greece comes alive in this vibrant portrait of the daily lives of ordinary people: men and women, children and the elderly, slaves and foreigners, rich and poor. Robert Garland presents a wealth of fascinating, sometimes surprising information about our spiritual, cultural and intellectual ancestors during this influential period. Did Greeks share our notion of romantic love? Why was it more desirable to be a slave than a day labourer? Were they really more cultivated than we are? Unique and descriptive, this attractive volume includes images throughout, as well as maps.

Hannibal

Hannibal

Author: Robert Garland Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 26/02/2010

Few people in history have achieved more yet with such fatal consequences for the cause that they supported than Hannibal. In this lively and accessible study Robert Garland explores Hannibal's fascinating but complex personality in the light of his extraordinary military and political career, which made him one of history's greatest survivors. He was certainly Rome's most formidable adversary, and the man who came closest to destroying her power base in Italy. At the same time Hannibal did more than anyone else to bring Carthage to the edge of ruin. His endurance in guiding his army and his elephants over the Alps tested the limits of what is humanly possible. And even at the end of his life, he never yielded an inch to his enemies. Garland investigates Hannibal's unintended yet powerful legacy and concludes that he is both an inspiration and a warning to anyone who dreams big dreams.

Introducing New Gods The Politics of Athenian Religion

Introducing New Gods The Politics of Athenian Religion

Author: Robert Garland Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 05/02/2009

The religious imagination of the Greeks, Robert Garland observes, was populated by divine beings whose goodwill could not be counted upon, and worshipers faced a heavy burden of choice among innumerable deities to whom they might offer their devotion. These deities-and Athenian polytheism itself-remained in constant flux as cults successively came into favor and waned. Examining the means through which the Athenians established and marketed cults, this handsomely illustrated book is the first to illuminate the full range of motives-political and economic, as well as spiritual-that prompted them to introduce new gods.

Celebrity in Antiquity From Media Tarts to Tabloid Queens

Celebrity in Antiquity From Media Tarts to Tabloid Queens

Author: Robert Garland Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 22/09/2006

What sort of people were able to grab the attention of the public in the ancient world? How was celebrity achieved? What methods did people use to achieve it? Robert Garland turns the spotlight on the careers of some of the most successful and colourful self-promoters ever to have lived, including Alcibiades, Socrates, Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Augustus, Jesus, Nero and Theodosia, and investigates the secrets of their success. He also looks at ways in which other highly talented individuals turned themselves into celebrities, including sports personalities, entertainers, philosophers, founders of new religions, and internationally renowned prostitutes. The reader may be forgiven for supposing that celebrity is a phenomenon that has no equivalent in antiquity. This book proves that it did!

Surviving Greek Tragedy

Surviving Greek Tragedy

Author: Robert Garland Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 25/03/2004

Surviving Greek Tragedy is a history of the physical survival to the present day of the thirty-two extant tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. Beginning with the first revival of the plays in the fourth century BC, it charts the course of their transmission down the centuries as they passed through the hands of actors, readers, scholars, schoolteachers, monks, publishers, translators, theatre directors, and so on. Over the course of this 2,400-year period, the plays were at different times performed, copied, quoted, emended, excerpted, analysed, taught, translated, censored, adapted, or merely left to moulder in a library, as each successive culture charged with their safe-keeping saw fit. In the last thirty years Greek tragedy has become the medium through which most people encounter the classical heritage, and in the book Garland gives extensive coverage to modern stagings of the plays all over the world, taking this story right up to the present.

The Greek Way of Death

The Greek Way of Death

Author: Robert Garland Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 05/07/2001

Surveying funerary rites and attitudes toward death from the time of Homer to the fourth century B.C., Robert Garland seeks to show what the ordinary Greek felt about death and the dead. The Second Edition features a substantial new prefatory essay in which Garland addresses recent questions and debates about death and the early Greeks. The book also includes an updated Supplementary Bibliography. Praise for the first edition: This [volume] contains a rich and remarkably complete collection of the abundant but scattered literary, artistic, and archaeological evidence on death in the ancient world as well as an extensive bibliography on the subject. Robert Garland conceives of death as a process, a rite of passage, a mutual but changing relationship between the deceased and [his or her] survivors. . . . A most useful collection of evidence, sensibly organized (no small feat) and lucidly presented. . . . A valuable source on the Greeks and on the always-lively subject of death. -American Historical Review Much can be learned from this engaging survey of popular attitudes toward death, the dying, and the dead in Greece down to the end of the Classical period. . . . Appealing to scholars and the general audience. -Religious Studies Review

The Piraeus From the Fifth to the First Century BC

The Piraeus From the Fifth to the First Century BC

Author: Robert Garland Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 24/05/2001

The Piraeus was one of the largest and most impressive ancient ports in the Mediterranean. During the fifth century BC it was laid out on a grid pattern by the urban planner Hippodamos and linked by the Long Walls with the city of Athens, some 8km away. It served as headquarters for the Athenian navy during the time of Athens' Aegean empire. Its emporion or commercial sector handled the bulk of Athenian imports, especially the grain on which the Athenians were wholly dependent. In conventional histories the story of the Piraeus is mostly hidden amidst material centred almost exclusively on Athens herself. Here Garland treats the Piraeus in its own right as an integral yet idiosyncratic component of Attika - one which exercised a decisive influence on Athenian history: its demographic profile linked it indissolubly with radical democracy; its Long Walls enabled Athenian leaders to pursue a policy which abandoned the Attic countryside in favour of a predominantly maritime strategy; later its Macedonian garrison could exercise control over Athens by threatening to cut off her essential imports. Garland analyses the demography of the Piraeus, its separate administrative organisation, its crucial economic and commercial importance, its key strategic and naval role, and its distinctive religious identity. He also traces the layout of the ancient town which lies largely buried beneath its no less vital modern successor.

Religion and the Greeks

Religion and the Greeks

Author: Robert Garland Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/01/1998

The Greek Way of Life

The Greek Way of Life

Author: Robert Garland Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/03/1996

Introducing New Gods The Politics of Athenian Religion

Introducing New Gods The Politics of Athenian Religion

Author: Robert Garland Format: Hardback Release Date: 16/01/1992

The religious imagination of the Greeks, Robert Garland observes, was populated by divine beings whose goodwill could not be counted upon, and worshipers faced a heavy burden of choice among innumerable deities to whom they might offer their devotion. These deities-and Athenian polytheism itself-remained in constant flux as cults successively came into favor and waned. Examining the means through which the Athenians established and marketed cults, this handsomely illustrated book is the first to illuminate the full range of motives-political and economic, as well as spiritual-that prompted them to introduce new gods.