John Gribbin, Mary Gribbin - Author

About the Author

John Gribbin gained a PhD from the Institute of Astronomy in Cambridge (then under the leadership of Fred Hoyle), before working as a science journalist for Nature and later New Scientist. Mary Gribbin is a teacher with a special gift for communicating difficult concepts, and she is a previous winner of the TES Junior Information Book Award. They have co-written several titles for adults and children. John has written many bestselling popular science books, including Erwin Schrodinger and the Quantum Revolution, In Search of the Multiverse and The Universe: A Biography. John and Mary are both Visiting Fellows at the University of Sussex.

Featured books by John Gribbin, Mary Gribbin

Out of the Shadow of a Giant Hooke, Halley and the Birth of British Science

Out of the Shadow of a Giant Hooke, Halley and the Birth of British Science

Author: John Gribbin, Mary Gribbin Format: Hardback Release Date: 18/05/2017

What if Isaac Newton had never lived? Robert Hooke and Edmond Halley, whose place in history has been overshadowed by the giant figure of Newton, were pioneering scientists within their own right, and instrumental in establishing the Royal Society.

Other books by John Gribbin, Mary Gribbin

Out of the Shadow of a Giant How Newton Stood on the Shoulders of Hooke and Halley

Out of the Shadow of a Giant How Newton Stood on the Shoulders of Hooke and Halley

Author: John Gribbin, Mary Gribbin Format: Paperback Release Date: 17/05/2018

What if Isaac Newton had never lived? Robert Hooke and Edmond Halley, whose place in history has been overshadowed by the giant figure of Newton, were pioneering scientists within their own right, and instrumental in establishing the Royal Society. Whilst Newton is widely regarded as one of the greatest scientists of all time, and the father of the English scientific revolution, John and Mary Gribbin uncover the fascinating story of Robert Hooke and Edmond Halley, whose scientific achievements neatly embrace the hundred years or so during which science as we know it became established in Britain. They argue persuasively that even without Newton science in Britain would have made a great leap forward in the second half of the seventeenth century, headed by two extraordinary men, Hooke and Halley.

Richard Feynman A Life in Science

Richard Feynman A Life in Science

Author: John Gribbin, Mary Gribbin Format: Paperback Release Date: 08/02/2018

One hundred years on from his birth, and 30 since his death, Richard Feynman's discoveries in modern physics are still thoroughly relevant. Magnificently charismatic and fun-loving, he brought a sense of adventure to the study of science. His extraordinary career included war-time work on the atomic bomb at Los Alamos, a profoundly original theory of quantum mechanics, for which he won the Nobel prize, and major contributions to the sciences of gravity, nuclear physics and particle theory. Interweaving personal anecdotes and recollections with clear scientific narrative, acclaimed science writers John and Mary Gribbin reveal a fascinating man with an immense passion for life - a superb teacher, a wonderful showman and one of the greatest scientists of his generation.

Out of the Shadow of a Giant Hooke, Halley and the Birth of British Science

Out of the Shadow of a Giant Hooke, Halley and the Birth of British Science

Author: John Gribbin, Mary Gribbin Format: Hardback Release Date: 18/05/2017

What if Isaac Newton had never lived? Robert Hooke and Edmond Halley, whose place in history has been overshadowed by the giant figure of Newton, were pioneering scientists within their own right, and instrumental in establishing the Royal Society.

Out of the Shadow of a Giant

Out of the Shadow of a Giant

Author: John Gribbin, Mary Gribbin Format: eBook Release Date: 18/05/2017

What if Isaac Newton had never lived? Robert Hooke and Edmond Halley, whose place in history has been overshadowed by the giant figure of Newton, were pioneering scientists within their own right, and instrumental in establishing the Royal Society. Whilst Newton is widely regarded as one of the greatest scientists of all time, and the father of the English scientific revolution, John and Mary Gribbin uncover the fascinating story of Robert Hooke and Edmond Halley, whose scientific achievements neatly embrace the hundred years or so during which science as we know it became established in Britain. They argue persuasively that even without Newton science in Britain would have made a great leap forward in the second half of the seventeenth century, headed by two extraordinary men, Hooke and Halley.

Science A History in 100 Experiments

Science A History in 100 Experiments

Author: Mary Gribbin, John Gribbin Format: Hardback Release Date: 20/10/2016

The history of science is a fascinating and long one, covering thousands of years of history. The development of scientific experiments involves some of the most enlightened cultures in history, as well as some great scientists, philosophers and theologians. As the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman said, 'If it disagrees with experiment, it is wrong', the simplest summary of what science is all about. And science is nothing without experiments. Everything in the scientific world view is based on experiment, including observations of phenomena predicted by theories and hypotheses, such as the bending of light as it goes past the Sun.

Essential Darwin

Essential Darwin

Author: John Gribbin, Mary Gribbin Format: eBook Release Date: 01/04/2014

Charles Darwin was the epitome of the Victorian gentleman amateur scientist, living entirely off inherited wealth and the income from his books. At the same time, however, he was the most professional scientist of his day.Darwin's life is full of contrast. In his youth, he seemed likely to become a wastrel, yet he became a hard-working and renowned scientist. His family life in a small Kentish village was mostly idyllically happy; but the loss of his favourite daughter, Annie, brought him intense misery that lasted long after her death. Darwin shunned publicity; but he became the most famous scientist of his time, for an idea which shook the foundations of Victorian society.Even today, some people reject his idea - evolution by natural selection - without bothering to find out what Darwin said. But it is one of those great achievements of the human intellect with which everyone should be acquainted.

Essential Einstein

Essential Einstein

Author: John Gribbin, Mary Gribbin Format: eBook Release Date: 01/04/2014

The definitive scientific icon of the twentieth century, Albert Einstein is remember for one equation, E=mc , and the image of a white-haired, pipe-smoking professor who didn t wear socks. But the equation comes from a time when all of his great work was done. The real Albert Einstein the high school drop-out who won the Nobel Prize along with the hearts of so many young women was young, handsome, dark haired and a natty dresser. And his greatest piece of work was so poorly understood at the time that the Nobel Committee, who couldn t understand it, but in a panic felt they ought to give him a prize for something, honoured him for something else. An introduction, afterword and clear chronological table place Einstein s work in the context of the development of scientific knowledge.

Essential Galileo

Essential Galileo

Author: John Gribbin, Mary Gribbin Format: eBook Release Date: 01/04/2014

Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) was the first scientist in the modern use of the term. Instead of relying on the works of Aristotle, he actually carried out experiments to test theories legend has it that one of his experiments involved throwing weights off the Leaning Tower of Pisa. His astronomical observations with the telescope shattered the idea that the Earth was at the centre of the Universe, and led to his trial for heresy. He had a great lust for life, three children by a woman he never married, a biting, sarcastic with and the friendship of princes and (in spite of his run in with Pope Urban VIII) cardinals. An introduction, afterword and clear chronological table place Galileo s work in the context of the development of scientific knowledge.

The Men Who Measured the Universe

The Men Who Measured the Universe

Author: John Gribbin, Mary Gribbin Format: Paperback Release Date: 04/03/2004

Less than a hundred years ago, astronomers believed that the stars of the Milky Way made up the entire Universe. By the end of the twentieth century, they knew that the Milky Way is just one island galaxy among hundreds of billions of galaxies spread across thousands of billions of light years of space. With the latest telescopes, we can see up to galaxies 10 billion light years from Earth. This revolution in our understanding of the cosmos and our place in it happened within a single human lifetime, through a combination of new technology, in the form of better telescopes, and the dedication of a handful of pioneers obsessed with measuring the distance scale of the Universe. It is their story that is told here, a story that reveals our curious fascination with the night sky, and the hard work, perseverance and spirit of those who sought through their observations to unlock its secrets.

Stardust Supernovae and Life -- The Cosmic Connection

Stardust Supernovae and Life -- The Cosmic Connection

Author: John Gribbin, Mary Gribbin Format: Paperback Release Date: 01/08/2001

We are made of stardust-and so is all life as we know it. All the chemical elements on earth except hydrogen-including the ones in our bodies-have been processed inside stars, scattered across the universe in great stellar explosions, and recycled to become new stars, planets, and parts of us. In this engrossing book, John and Mary Gribbin relate the developments in twentieth-century astronomy that have led to this shattering realization. They begin their account in the 1920s, when astronomers discovered that the oldest stars are chiefly composed of the primordial elements hydrogen and helium, produced in the birth of the universe in a Big Bang. They then describe the seminal work of the 1950s and 1960s, which unlocked the secret of how elements are cooked by nuclear fusion inside stars. The heart of the story is their discussion of supernovae, only recently understood as great stellar explosions in which the resulting ash is spread far and wide through the cosmos, forming new generations of stars, planets, and people. Focusing on the relationship between the universe and the Earth, the authors eloquently explain how the physical structure of the universe has produced conditions ideal for life.

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