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Denise Riley - Author

About the Author

Denise Riley is a critically acclaimed writer of both philosophy and poetry. She is currently Professor of the History of Ideas and of Poetry at UEA. Her visiting positions have included A.D. White Professor at Cornell University in the US, Writer in Residence at the Tate Gallery in London, and Visiting Fellow at Birkbeck College in the University of London. She has taught philosophy, art history, poetics, and creative writing. Denise Riley lives in London.

Featured books by Denise Riley

Say Something Back

Say Something Back

Author: Denise Riley Format: Paperback Release Date: 19/05/2016

Say Something Back will allow readers to see just why the name of Denise Riley has been held in such high regard by her fellow poets for so long. The book reproduces A Part Song, a profoundly moving document of grieving and loss, and one of the most widely admired long poems of recent years. Elsewhere these poems become a space for contemplation of the natural world and of physical law, and for the deep consideration of what it is to invoke those who are absent. But finally, they extend our sense of what the act of human speech can mean - and especially what is drawn forth from us when we address our dead.

Other books by Denise Riley

Backpockets

Backpockets

Author: Denise Riley Format: Paperback Release Date: 31/05/2016

Say Something Back

Say Something Back

Author: Denise Riley Format: Paperback Release Date: 19/05/2016

Say Something Back will allow readers to see just why the name of Denise Riley has been held in such high regard by her fellow poets for so long. The book reproduces A Part Song, a profoundly moving document of grieving and loss, and one of the most widely admired long poems of recent years. Elsewhere these poems become a space for contemplation of the natural world and of physical law, and for the deep consideration of what it is to invoke those who are absent. But finally, they extend our sense of what the act of human speech can mean - and especially what is drawn forth from us when we address our dead.

Say Something Back

Say Something Back

Author: Denise Riley Format: eBook Release Date: 19/05/2016

Say Something Back will allow readers to see just why the name of Denise Riley has been held in such high regard by her fellow poets for so long. The book reproduces A Part Song, a profoundly moving document of grieving and loss, and one of the most widely admired long poems of recent years. Elsewhere these poems become a space for contemplation of the natural world and of physical law, and for the deep consideration of what it is to invoke those who are absent. But finally, they extend our sense of what the act of human speech can mean - and especially what is drawn forth from us when we address our dead. Lyric, intimate, acidly witty, unflinchingly brave, Say Something Back is a deeply moving book by one of our finest poets, and one destined to introduce Riley's name to a wide new readership.

Impersonal Passion Language as Affect

Impersonal Passion Language as Affect

Author: Denise Riley Format: Hardback Release Date: 08/04/2005

Denise Riley is renowned as a feminist theorist and a poet and for her remarkable refiguring of familiar but intransigent problems of identity, expression, language, and politics. In Impersonal Passion, she turns to everyday complex emotional and philosophical problems of speaking and listening. Her provocative meditations suggest that while the emotional power of language is impersonal, this impersonality paradoxically constitutes the personal. In nine linked essays, Riley deftly unravels the rhetoric of life's absurdities and urgencies, its comforts and embarrassments, to insist on the forcible affect of language itself. She teases out the emotional complexities of such quotidian matters as what she ironically terms the right to be lonely in the face of the imperative to be social or the guilt associated with feeling as if you're lying when you aren't. Impersonal Passion reinvents questions from linguistics, the philosophy of language, and cultural theory in an illuminating new idiom: the compelling emotion of the language of the everyday.

The Force of Language

The Force of Language

Author: Denise Riley, Jean-Jacques Lecercle Format: Hardback Release Date: 20/10/2004

The Force of Language illustrates how the philosophy of Language, if differently conceived, can directly incorporate questions of political thought and of emotionality, and offers the practical case of defensive strategies against the abusive speech. This follows a broad consideration of the inner voice or inner speech as a test case for a new approach to language, in particular as a way of radically rethinking the usual contrast between inner and outer through furnishing an account of how we internalize speech. The book's core offers a substantial critique of orthodox approaches to the philosophy of language form Chomsky and others; drawing on European political thought from Marx to Deleuze, it will move beyond this inheritance to explain and demonstrate its fresh conception of language at work.

The Language, Discourse, Society Reader

The Language, Discourse, Society Reader

Author: Denise Riley Format: Hardback Release Date: 13/08/2004

For the last twenty-five years, Language, Discourse, Society has been the most intellectually challenging series in English. Its titles range across the disciplines from linguistics to biology, from literary criticism to law, combining vigorous scholarship and theoretical analysis at the service of a broad political engagement. This anniversary reader brings together a fascinating group of thinkers from both sides of the Atlantic with an introductory overview from the editors which considers the development of theory and scholarship over the past two decades.

The Language, Discourse, Society Reader

The Language, Discourse, Society Reader

Author: Denise Riley Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 10/08/2004

For the last twenty-five years, Language, Discourse, Society has been the most intellectually challenging series in English. Its titles range across the disciplines from linguistics to biology, from literary criticism to law, combining vigorous scholarship and theoretical analysis at the service of a broad political engagement. This anniversary reader brings together a fascinating group of thinkers from both sides of the Atlantic with an introductory overview from the editors which considers the development of theory and scholarship over the past two decades.

The Words of Selves Identification, Solidarity, Irony

The Words of Selves Identification, Solidarity, Irony

Author: Denise Riley Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/07/2000

Marlene Dietrich had the last line in Orson Welles's A Touch of Evil: What does it matter what you say about other people? The author ponders the question: What does it matter what you say about yourself? She wonders why the requirement to be a something-or-other should be so hard to satisfy in a manner that rings true in the ears of its own subject. She decides that some hesitations and awkwardness in inhabiting many categories of the person-including those celebrated by what is sometimes termed identity politics-need not evidence either psychological weakness or political lack of nerve.Neither an identity nor a nonidentity can quite convince. But if this discomfort inhering in self-characterization needs to be fully admitted and registered-as something that is simultaneously linguistic and affective-it can also be cheerfully tolerated. Here language is not treated as a guileful thing that leads its speakers astray. Though the business of being called something, and of being positioned by that calling, is often an unhappy affair, irony can offer effective therapy. Even if uncertain and volatile categorizations do trouble the politics that they also shape, they hardly weaken the empathetic solidarity that is distinct from identification. The verbal irony of self-presentation can be politically helpful. Questioning the received diction of the self cannot be dismissed merely as a luxury of those in secure positions, but instead can move toward a conception of a constructive nonidentity.This extended meditation on the language of the self within contemporary social politics also considers the lyrical I and linguistic emotionality, the historical status of irony, and the possibilities of a nonidentitarian solidarity that is unapologetically alert to the affect of language.

The Words of Selves Identification, Solidarity, Irony

The Words of Selves Identification, Solidarity, Irony

Author: Denise Riley Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/06/2000

Marlene Dietrich had the last line in Orson Welles's A Touch of Evil: What does it matter what you say about other people? The author ponders the question: What does it matter what you say about yourself? She wonders why the requirement to be a something-or-other should be so hard to satisfy in a manner that rings true in the ears of its own subject. She decides that some hesitations and awkwardness in inhabiting many categories of the person-including those celebrated by what is sometimes termed identity politics-need not evidence either psychological weakness or political lack of nerve.Neither an identity nor a nonidentity can quite convince. But if this discomfort inhering in self-characterization needs to be fully admitted and registered-as something that is simultaneously linguistic and affective-it can also be cheerfully tolerated. Here language is not treated as a guileful thing that leads its speakers astray. Though the business of being called something, and of being positioned by that calling, is often an unhappy affair, irony can offer effective therapy. Even if uncertain and volatile categorizations do trouble the politics that they also shape, they hardly weaken the empathetic solidarity that is distinct from identification. The verbal irony of self-presentation can be politically helpful. Questioning the received diction of the self cannot be dismissed merely as a luxury of those in secure positions, but instead can move toward a conception of a constructive nonidentity.This extended meditation on the language of the self within contemporary social politics also considers the lyrical I and linguistic emotionality, the historical status of irony, and the possibilities of a nonidentitarian solidarity that is unapologetically alert to the affect of language.

Poets on Writing Britain, 1970-1991

Poets on Writing Britain, 1970-1991

Author: Denise Riley Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 02/06/1992

A collection of essays and some related poems by almost 30 contemporary poets who have worked for years outside the mainstream of British publishing. Many are or have been small-press publishers and editors too.

`Am I That Name?' Feminism and the Category of `Women' in History

`Am I That Name?' Feminism and the Category of `Women' in History

Author: Denise Riley Format: Hardback Release Date: 28/10/1988

Writing about changes in the notion of womanhood, Denise Riley examines, in the manner of Foucault, shifting historical constructions of the category of women in relation to other categories central to concepts of personhood: the soul, the mind, the body, nature, the social. Feminist movements, Riley argues, have had no choice but to play out this indeterminacy of women. This is made plain in their oscillations, since the 1790s, between concepts of equality and of difference. To fully recognize the ambiguity of the category of women is, she contends, a necessary condition for an effective feminist political philosophy.

`Am I That Name?' Feminism and the Category of `Women' in History

`Am I That Name?' Feminism and the Category of `Women' in History

Author: Denise Riley Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/10/1988

Writing about changes in the notion of womanhood, Denise Riley examines, in the manner of Foucault, shifting historical constructions of the category of women in relation to other categories central to concepts of personhood: the soul, the mind, the body, nature, the social. Feminist movements, Riley argues, have had no choice but to play out this indeterminacy of women. This is made plain in their oscillations, since the 1790s, between concepts of equality and of difference. To fully recognize the ambiguity of the category of women is, she contends, a necessary condition for an effective feminist political philosophy.

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