Richard Aldrich - Author

About the Author

Richard Aldrich is a regular commentator on war and espionage and has written for the Evening Standard, the Guardian, The Times and the Telegraph. He is the author of several books, including 'The Hidden Hand: Britain, America and Cold War Secret Intelligence' which won the Donner Book Prize in 2002.

Featured books by Richard Aldrich

GCHQ

GCHQ

Author: Richard Aldrich Format: Paperback Release Date: 07/07/2011

A gripping exploration of the last great unknown realm of the British secret service: Government Communication Headquarters (GCHQ). GCHQ is the successor to the famous Bletchley Park wartime code-breaking organisation and is the largest and most secretive intelligence organisation in the country. During the war, it commanded more staff than MI5 and MI6 combined and has produced a number of intelligence triumphs, as well as some notable failures. Since the end of the Cold War, it has played a pivotal role in shaping Britain's secret state. Still, we know almost nothing about it. In this ground-breaking new book, Richard Aldrich traces GCHQ's evolvement from a wartime code-breaking operation based in the Bedfordshire countryside, staffed by eccentric crossword puzzlers, to one of the world leading espionage organisations. It is packed full of dramatic spy stories that shed fresh light on Britain's role in the Cold War -- from the secret tunnels dug beneath Vienna and Berlin to tap Soviet phone lines, and daring submarine missions to gather intelligence from the Soviet fleet, to the notorious case of Geoffrey Pine, one of the most damaging moles ever recruited by the Soviets inside British intelligence. The book reveals for the first time how GCHQ operators based in Cheltenham affected the outcome of military confrontations in far-flung locations such as Indonesia and Malaya, and exposes the shocking case of three GCHQ workers who were killed in an infamous shootout with terrorists while working undercover in Turkey. Today's GCHQ struggles with some of the most difficult issues of our time. A leading force of the state's security efforts against militant terrorist organisations like Al-Qaeda, they are also involved in fundamental issues that will mould the future of British society. Compelling and revelatory, Aldrich's book is the crucial missing link in Britain's intelligence history.

Other books by Richard Aldrich

A Guide to Parsifal

A Guide to Parsifal

Author: Richard Aldrich Format: Paperback Release Date: 18/08/2017

The Black Door Spies, Secret Intelligence and British Prime Ministers

The Black Door Spies, Secret Intelligence and British Prime Ministers

Author: Richard Aldrich, Rory Cormac Format: Paperback Release Date: 20/04/2017

The Black Door explores the evolving relationship between successive British prime ministers and the intelligence agencies, from Asquith's Secret Service Bureau to Cameron's National Security Council. Intelligence can do a prime minister's dirty work. For more than a century, secret wars have been waged directly from Number 10. They have staved off conflict, defeats and British decline through fancy footwork, often deceiving friend and foe alike. Yet as the birth of the modern British secret service in 1909, prime ministers were strangers to the secret world - sometimes with disastrous consequences. During the Second World War, Winston Churchill oversaw a remarkable revolution in the exploitation of intelligence, bringing it into the centre of government. Chruchill's wartime regime also formed a school of intelligence for future prime ministers, and its secret legacy has endured. Margaret Thatcher, Tony Blair and David Cameron all became great enthusiasts for spies and special forces. Although Britain's political leaders have often feigned ignorance about what one prime minister called this `strange underworld', some of the most daring and controversial intelligence operations can be traced straight back to Number 10.

The Black Door Spies, Secret Intelligence and British Prime Ministers

The Black Door Spies, Secret Intelligence and British Prime Ministers

Author: Richard Aldrich, Rory Cormac Format: Hardback Release Date: 28/03/2017

The Black Door explores the evolving relationship between successive British prime ministers and the intelligence agencies, from Asquith's Secret Service Bureau to Cameron's National Security Council. Intelligence can do a prime minister's dirty work. For more than a century, secret wars have been waged directly from Number 10. They have staved off conflict, defeats and British decline through fancy footwork, often deceiving friend and foe alike. Yet as the birth of the modern British secret service in 1909, prime ministers were strangers to the secret world - sometimes with disastrous consequences. During the Second World War, Winston Churchill oversaw a remarkable revolution in the exploitation of intelligence, bringing it into the centre of government. Chruchill's wartime regime also formed a school of intelligence for future prime ministers, and its secret legacy has endured. Margaret Thatcher, Tony Blair and David Cameron all became great enthusiasts for spies and special forces. Although Britain's political leaders have often feigned ignorance about what one prime minister called this `strange underworld', some of the most daring and controversial intelligence operations can be traced straight back to Number 10.

Dictionary of British Educationists

Dictionary of British Educationists

Author: Richard Aldrich, Peter Gordon Format: Paperback Release Date: 20/06/2016

This dictionary provides the reader with an easily accessible guide to the biographies of approximately 450 educationists. It covers the period from 1800 to the present day and includes a wide range of people who were active in promoting education at different levels.

The Black Door Spies, Secret Intelligence and British Prime Ministers

The Black Door Spies, Secret Intelligence and British Prime Ministers

Author: Richard Aldrich, Rory Cormac Format: Paperback Release Date: 21/04/2016

The Black Door explores the evolving relationship between successive British prime ministers and the intelligence agencies, from Asquith's Secret Service Bureau to Cameron's National Security Council. Intelligence can do a prime minister's dirty work. For more than a century, secret wars have been waged directly from Number 10. They have staved off conflict, defeats and British decline through fancy footwork, often deceiving friend and foe alike. Yet as the birth of the modern British secret service in 1909, prime ministers were strangers to the secret world - sometimes with disastrous consequences. During the Second World War, Winston Churchill oversaw a remarkable revolution in the exploitation of intelligence, bringing it into the centre of government. Chruchill's wartime regime also formed a school of intelligence for future prime ministers, and its secret legacy has endured. Margaret Thatcher, Tony Blair and David Cameron all became great enthusiasts for spies and special forces. Although Britain's political leaders have often feigned ignorance about what one prime minister called this `strange underworld', some of the most daring and controversial intelligence operations can be traced straight back to Number 10.

Black Door

Black Door

Author: Richard Aldrich, Rory Cormac Format: eBook Release Date: 21/04/2016

'The Black Door' explores the evolving relationship between successive British prime ministers and the intelligence agencies, from Asquith's Secret Service Bureau to Cameron's National Security Council. At the beginning of the 20th Century the British intelligence system was underfunded and lacked influence in government. But as the new millennium dawned, intelligence had become so integral to policy that it was used to make the case for war. Now, covert action is incorporated seamlessly into government policy, and the Prime Minister is kept constantly updated by intelligence agencies. But how did intelligence come to influence our government so completely?'The Black Door' explores the murkier corridors of No. 10 Downing Street, chronicling the relationships between intelligence agencies and the Prime Ministers of the last century. From Churchill's code-breakers feeding information to the Soviets to Eden's attempts to assassinate foreign leaders, from Wilson's paranoia of an MI5-led coup d'etat to Thatcher's covert wars in Central America, Aldrich and Cormac entertain and enlighten as they explain how our government came to rely on intelligence to the extent that it does today.

The Black Door Spies, Secret Intelligence and British Prime Ministers

The Black Door Spies, Secret Intelligence and British Prime Ministers

Author: Richard Aldrich, Rory Cormac Format: Hardback Release Date: 21/03/2016

The Black Door explores the evolving relationship between successive British prime ministers and the intelligence agencies, from Asquith's Secret Service Bureau to Cameron's National Security Council. Intelligence can do a prime minister's dirty work. For more than a century, secret wars have been waged directly from Number 10. They have staved off conflict, defeats and British decline through fancy footwork, often deceiving friend and foe alike. Yet as the birth of the modern British secret service in 1909, prime ministers were strangers to the secret world - sometimes with disastrous consequences. During the Second World War, Winston Churchill oversaw a remarkable revolution in the exploitation of intelligence, bringing it into the centre of government. Chruchill's wartime regime also formed a school of intelligence for future prime ministers, and its secret legacy has endured. Margaret Thatcher, Tony Blair and David Cameron all became great enthusiasts for spies and special forces. Although Britain's political leaders have often feigned ignorance about what one prime minister called this `strange underworld', some of the most daring and controversial intelligence operations can be traced straight back to Number 10.

A Guide to Parsifal

A Guide to Parsifal

Author: Richard Aldrich Format: Hardback Release Date: 08/08/2015

A Guide to the Ring of the Nibelung

A Guide to the Ring of the Nibelung

Author: Richard Aldrich Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 09/07/2013

Institute of Education 1902-2002

Institute of Education 1902-2002

Author: Richard Aldrich Format: eBook Release Date: 03/10/2012

This centenary history provides the first comprehensive study of the Institute of Education, University of London, the United Kingdom's premier institution for the study of education. The story is essentially one of change. Founded in 1902 as the London Day Training College to provide teachers for the capital's elementary schools, a century later the Institute has become a college of the University of London, a national and international postgraduate centre for educational enquiry with 4,400 students from 80 countries. Drawing upon a wide range of sources, including previously unused archival material and formal interviews with key figures, Richard Aldrich sets the Institute's own story within metropolitan, national and international contexts. The result is an elegantly written history, characterized by substantial scholarship and analysis and enlivened by illustrations and anecdote. Above all, the pages of this book are peopled with some of the most influential, and at times controversial, figures of the twentieth-century world of education - including Sidney Webb, John Adams, Sophie Bryant, Percy Nunn, Cyril Burt, Susan Isaacs, Marion Richardson, Fred Clarke, Joseph Lauwerys, Richard Peters, Basil Bernstein, William Taylor, Ann Oakley and Peter Mortimore. This book will appeal not only to all those connected with the Institute of Education, past, present and future, but also to anyone with an interest in teaching and learning, higher education, educational research and the making of educational policy.

School and Society in Victorian Britain Joseph Payne and the New World of Education

School and Society in Victorian Britain Joseph Payne and the New World of Education

Author: Richard Aldrich Format: Hardback Release Date: 08/12/2011

Drawing on hitherto-unused sources this book represents a shift in the historiography of British education. At the centre of the investigation is Joseph Payne. He was one of the group of pioneers who founded the College of Preceptors in 1846 and in 1873 he was appointed to the first professorship of education in Britain, established by the College of Preceptors. By that date Payne had acquired a considerable reputation. He was a classroom practitioner of rare skill, the founder of two of the most successful Victorian private schools, the author of best-selling text-books, a scholar of note despite his lack of formal education, and a leading member of the College of Preceptors and such bodies as the Scholastic Registration Association, the Girls' Public Day School Trust, the Women's Education Union and the Social Science Association.

GCHQ

GCHQ

Author: Richard Aldrich Format: Paperback Release Date: 07/07/2011

A gripping exploration of the last great unknown realm of the British secret service: Government Communication Headquarters (GCHQ). GCHQ is the successor to the famous Bletchley Park wartime code-breaking organisation and is the largest and most secretive intelligence organisation in the country. During the war, it commanded more staff than MI5 and MI6 combined and has produced a number of intelligence triumphs, as well as some notable failures. Since the end of the Cold War, it has played a pivotal role in shaping Britain's secret state. Still, we know almost nothing about it. In this ground-breaking new book, Richard Aldrich traces GCHQ's evolvement from a wartime code-breaking operation based in the Bedfordshire countryside, staffed by eccentric crossword puzzlers, to one of the world leading espionage organisations. It is packed full of dramatic spy stories that shed fresh light on Britain's role in the Cold War -- from the secret tunnels dug beneath Vienna and Berlin to tap Soviet phone lines, and daring submarine missions to gather intelligence from the Soviet fleet, to the notorious case of Geoffrey Pine, one of the most damaging moles ever recruited by the Soviets inside British intelligence. The book reveals for the first time how GCHQ operators based in Cheltenham affected the outcome of military confrontations in far-flung locations such as Indonesia and Malaya, and exposes the shocking case of three GCHQ workers who were killed in an infamous shootout with terrorists while working undercover in Turkey. Today's GCHQ struggles with some of the most difficult issues of our time. A leading force of the state's security efforts against militant terrorist organisations like Al-Qaeda, they are also involved in fundamental issues that will mould the future of British society. Compelling and revelatory, Aldrich's book is the crucial missing link in Britain's intelligence history.

Public or Private Education? Lessons from History

Public or Private Education? Lessons from History

Author: Richard Aldrich Format: Paperback Release Date: 05/02/2004

This collection of essays, edited by the distinguished historian of education Richard Aldrich, examines past, present and future relationships between the private and public dimensions of knowledge and education. Following the introduction, it is divided into three sections: * key themes and turning points in Britain in the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries * examples from the twentieth century of non formal education with particular reference to girls and women, the care and education of pre-school children, sex education and family history * an analysis of the private and public dimensions associated with globalization and international education and of examples drawn from Australia and the USA. This book will become required reading not only in respect of contemporary and historical debates about private and public spheres in education, but also with reference to the wider themes of the creation, diffusion and ownership of knowledge.

Century of Education

Century of Education

Author: Richard Aldrich Format: eBook Release Date: 01/11/2002

The Institute of Education 1902-2002 A centenary history

The Institute of Education 1902-2002 A centenary history

Author: Richard Aldrich Format: Paperback Release Date: 01/10/2002

Public or Private Education? Lessons from History

Public or Private Education? Lessons from History

Author: Richard Aldrich Format: Hardback Release Date: 22/07/2002

This collection of essays, edited by the distinguished historian of education Richard Aldrich, examines past, present and future relationships between the private and public dimensions of knowledge and education. Following the introduction, it is divided into three sections: * key themes and turning points in Britain in the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries * examples from the twentieth century of non formal education with particular reference to girls and women, the care and education of pre-school children, sex education and family history * an analysis of the private and public dimensions associated with globalization and international education and of examples drawn from Australia and the USA. This book will become required reading not only in respect of contemporary and historical debates about private and public spheres in education, but also with reference to the wider themes of the creation, diffusion and ownership of knowledge.

A Century of Education

A Century of Education

Author: Richard Aldrich Format: Hardback Release Date: 22/11/2001

Education is a country's biggest business and the most important shared experience of those who live in it. A Century of Education provides an accessible, authoritative and fascinating overview of the role and nature of education in the twentieth century. Eminent historian of education, Professor Richard Aldrich has assembled a team of contributors, all noted experts in their respective fields, to review the successes and failures of education in the last century and to look forward to the next. A succinct overview of twentieth century social, economic, political and intellectual developments in the first chapter is followed by chapters on ten key topics. Each chapter has four sections: a review of the educational situation in 2000; a similar assessment in 1900; changes and continuities throughout the century; and a conclusion reviewing the lessons for today and tomorrow. This is a work of information, interpretation and reference, which demonstrates the strengths and weaknesses of education during the twentieth century and identifies educational priorities for the twenty first. For anyone interested in what has become the most important Issue of our time, this unique book is set to become a classic text.

A Century of Education

A Century of Education

Author: Richard Aldrich Format: Paperback Release Date: 15/11/2001

Education is a country's biggest business and the most important shared experience of those who live in it. A Century of Education provides an accessible, authoritative and fascinating overview of the role and nature of education in the twentieth century. Eminent historian of education, Professor Richard Aldrich has assembled a team of contributors, all noted experts in their respective fields, to review the successes and failures of education in the last century and to look forward to the next. A succinct overview of twentieth century social, economic, political and intellectual developments in the first chapter is followed by chapters on ten key topics. Each chapter has four sections: a review of the educational situation in 2000; a similar assessment in 1900; changes and continuities throughout the century; and a conclusion reviewing the lessons for today and tomorrow. This is a work of information, interpretation and reference, which demonstrates the strengths and weaknesses of education during the twentieth century and identifies educational priorities for the twenty first. For anyone interested in what has become the most important Issue of our time, this unique book is set to become a classic text.

Education and Policy in England in the Twentieth Century

Education and Policy in England in the Twentieth Century

Author: Richard Aldrich, Dennis Dean, Peter Gordon Format: Hardback Release Date: 28/03/1991

In the 1990s education has become one of the major social and political questions of the day. This book has been written to provide an authoritative guide to the issues which underlie the formulation of educational policy. It stands both as a substantial historical study in its own right and as an essential background and introduction to the current educational debate.

Dictionary of British Educationists

Dictionary of British Educationists

Author: Richard Aldrich, Peter Gordon Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/04/1989

This dictionary provides the reader with an easily accessible guide to the biographies of approximately 450 educationists. It covers the period from 1800 to the present day and includes a wide range of people who were active in promoting education at different levels.

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