Walter Reid - Author

About the Author

Walter Reid was educated at Oxford University, where he read history, and Edinburgh University. He is now based in the west of Scotland, but spends part of the year in France. His previous work includes 'To Arras, 1917' (Tuckwell Press), and the critically acclaimed biography of Douglas Haig, 'Architect of Victory' (Birlinn, 2006).

Featured books by Walter Reid

Other books by Walter Reid

The Meaning of Company Accounts

The Meaning of Company Accounts

Author: Walter Reid Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/09/2018

Five Days From Defeat How Britain Nearly Lost the First World War

Five Days From Defeat How Britain Nearly Lost the First World War

Author: Walter Reid Format: Hardback Release Date: 02/11/2017

On 21 March 1918 Germany initiated one of the most ferocious and offensives of the First World War. During the so-called Kaiserschlacht, German troops advanced on allied positions in a series of ferocious attacks which caused massive casualties, separated British and French forces and drove the British back towards the Channel ports. Five days later, as the German advance continued, one of the most dramatic summits of the war took place in Doullens. The outcome was to have extraordinary consequences. For the first time an allied supreme commander - the French General Foch - was appointed to command all the allied armies, while the statesmen realized that unity of purpose rather than national interest was ultimately the key to success. Within a few months a policy of defence became one of offence, and paved the way for British success at Amiens and the series of unbroken British victories that led Germany to plea for armistice. Victory in November 1918 was a matter for celebration; what was excised from history was how close Britain was to ignominious defeat just eight months earlier.

The Meaning of Company Accounts

The Meaning of Company Accounts

Author: Walter Reid Format: Hardback Release Date: 23/10/2017

The Meaning of Company Accounts first appeared in 1971 and quickly achieved recognition among managers, financial and non-financial alike. It is now seen as the standard text in the subject. It aims to help anyone using company accounts to gain a firm grasp of what they mean and how they relate to business activities. Throughout the book, ideas are developed in a logical, structured sequence, involving a high degree of reader participation, while at the same time being extremely flexible. The workbook approach, including examples to be worked through, enables readers to achieve understanding of topics they may previously have found difficult. This eighth edition has been thoroughly revised to ensure that the text and appendices are current. It includes up-to-date references of both international and UK accounting standards.

Supreme Sacrifice A Small Village and the Great War

Supreme Sacrifice A Small Village and the Great War

Author: Walter Reid, Paul Birch, Gordon Masterton Format: Paperback Release Date: 01/08/2016

The war memorial in the Scottish village of Bridge of Weir lists 72 men who died during the First World War. Their deaths occurred in almost every theatre of the war. They were awarded very few medals and their military careers were not remarkable - except in the important respect that they, like countless other peaceful civilians, answered their country's call in its time of need. This book follows the lives of these sons of Bridge of Weir, not just as soldiers, sailors and airmen, but as husbands, fathers, sons, brothers and members of a small local community which felt their loss intensely. At the same time it also paints a larger picture of the war - of the politicians and generals and military campaigns which shaped it. The brave men of Bridge of Weir know little of the wider context - their experience was of the little histories in which they fought and died. Readers of this book will understand what the 72 never knew: why and how the war was fought that claimed their lives.

Empire of Sand How Britain Made the Middle East

Empire of Sand How Britain Made the Middle East

Author: Walter Reid Format: Paperback Release Date: 05/09/2013

At the end of the First World War Britain and to a much lesser extent France created the modern Middle East. The possessions of the former Ottoman Empire were carved up with scant regard for the wishes of those who lived there. Frontiers were devised and alien dynasties imposed on the populations as arbitrarily as in medieval times. From the outset the project was destined to failure. Conflicting and ambiguous promises had been made to the Arabs during the war but were not honoured. Brief hopes for Arab unity were dashed, and a harsh belief in western perfidy persists to the present day. Britain was quick to see the riches promised by the black pools of oil that lay on the ground around Baghdad. When France too grasped their importance, bitter differences opened up and the area became the focus of a return to traditional enmity. The war-time allies came close to blows and then drifted apart, leaving a vacuum of which Hitler took advantage. Working from both primary and secondary sources, Walter Reid explores Britain's role in the creation of the modern Middle East and the rise of Zionism from the early years of the twentieth century to 1948, when Britain handed over Palestine to UN control. From the decisions that Britain made has flowed much of the instability of the region and of the world-wide tensions that threaten the twenty-first century. How far was Britain to blame?

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