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Roger Hutchinson - Author

About the Author

Roger Hutchinson is an award-winning author and journalist. After working as an editor in London, in 1977 he joined the West Highland Free Press in Skye. Since then he has published thirteen books, including Polly: the True Story Behind Whisky Galore. He is still attached to the WHFP as editorialist and columnist, and has written for BBC Radio, The Scotsman, The Guardian, The Herald and The Literary Review. His book The Soap Man (Birlinn 2003) was shortlisted for the Saltire Scottish Book of the Year (2004). Calum’s Road has been a huge bestseller, shortlisted for the Ondaatje Prize (2007) with film rights sold.

Featured books by Roger Hutchinson

The Butcher, the Baker, the Candlestick-Maker The Story of Britain Through its Census, Since 1801

The Butcher, the Baker, the Candlestick-Maker The Story of Britain Through its Census, Since 1801

Author: Roger Hutchinson Format: Hardback Release Date: 02/02/2017

At the beginning of each decade for 200 years the national census has presented a self-portrait of the British Isles. The census has surveyed Britain from the Napoleonic wars to the age of the internet, through the agricultural and industrial revolutions, possession of the biggest empire on earth and the devastation of the 20th century's two world wars. In The Butcher, the Baker, the Candlestick Maker, Roger Hutchinson looks at every census between the first in 1801 and the latest in 2011. He uses this much-loved resource of family historians to paint a vivid picture of a society experiencing unprecedented changes. Hutchinson explores the controversial creation of the British census. He follows its development from a head-count of the population conducted by clerks with quill pens, to a computerised survey which is designed to discover 'the address, place of birth, religion, marital status, ability to speak English and self-perceived national identity of every twenty-seven-year-old Welsh-speaking Sikh metalworker living in Swansea'. The Butcher, the Baker, the Candlestick Maker is as original and unique as those people and their islands on the cutting edge of Europe.

Other books by Roger Hutchinson

The Butcher, the Baker, the Candlestick-Maker The story of Britain through its census, since 1801

The Butcher, the Baker, the Candlestick-Maker The story of Britain through its census, since 1801

Author: Roger Hutchinson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 07/12/2017

At the beginning of each decade for 200 years the national census has presented a self-portrait of the British Isles. The census has surveyed Britain from the Napoleonic wars to the age of the internet, through the agricultural and industrial revolutions, possession of the biggest empire on earth and the devastation of the 20th century's two world wars. In The Butcher, the Baker, the Candlestick Maker, Roger Hutchinson looks at every census between the first in 1801 and the latest in 2011. He uses this much-loved resource of family historians to paint a vivid picture of a society experiencing unprecedented changes. Hutchinson explores the controversial creation of the British census. He follows its development from a head-count of the population conducted by clerks with quill pens, to a computerised survey which is designed to discover 'the address, place of birth, religion, marital status, ability to speak English and self-perceived national identity of every twenty-seven-year-old Welsh-speaking Sikh metalworker living in Swansea'. All human life is here, from prime ministers to peasants and paupers, from Irish rebels to English patriots, from the last native speakers of Cornish to the first professional footballers, from communities of prostitutes to individuals called 'abecedarians' who made a living from teaching the alphabet. The Butcher, the Baker, the Candlestick Maker is as original and unique as those people and their islands on the cutting edge of Europe.

The Butcher, the Baker, the Candlestick-Maker The Story of Britain Through its Census, Since 1801

The Butcher, the Baker, the Candlestick-Maker The Story of Britain Through its Census, Since 1801

Author: Roger Hutchinson Format: Hardback Release Date: 02/02/2017

At the beginning of each decade for 200 years the national census has presented a self-portrait of the British Isles. The census has surveyed Britain from the Napoleonic wars to the age of the internet, through the agricultural and industrial revolutions, possession of the biggest empire on earth and the devastation of the 20th century's two world wars. In The Butcher, the Baker, the Candlestick Maker, Roger Hutchinson looks at every census between the first in 1801 and the latest in 2011. He uses this much-loved resource of family historians to paint a vivid picture of a society experiencing unprecedented changes. Hutchinson explores the controversial creation of the British census. He follows its development from a head-count of the population conducted by clerks with quill pens, to a computerised survey which is designed to discover 'the address, place of birth, religion, marital status, ability to speak English and self-perceived national identity of every twenty-seven-year-old Welsh-speaking Sikh metalworker living in Swansea'. The Butcher, the Baker, the Candlestick Maker is as original and unique as those people and their islands on the cutting edge of Europe.

Under the Fig Tree Visual Prayers and Poems for Lent

Under the Fig Tree Visual Prayers and Poems for Lent

Author: Roger Hutchinson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 19/01/2016

* Lenten devotional journal * Well-known artist and author of The Painting Table * Resource or gift for confirmation, pilgrimages, grief, prayer In John 1:48, Nathanael says to Jesus, How do you know me? Jesus replies, with a twinkle in his eye, I saw you while you were still under the fig tree. Lent is a time to slow down and journey with Jesus through his life, death, and resurrection. Under the Fig Tree is a book of 46 drawings, photographs, and paintings inspired by Lenten themes, readings, and stories for each day of Lent and Holy Week. The images, like snapshots, are colorful, inspired, and ripe with emotion. The reader receives an opportunity to reflect, slow down, and walk with Jesus as a friend and disciple, to sit with Jesus under the fig tree and talk, listen, and glimpse the face and heart of authentic love. For all ages - children, youth, adults; Lenten resource for individuals and small groups; clergy; Christian educators; teachers; pastoral counselors; grief groups; families.

Martyrs

Martyrs

Author: Roger Hutchinson Format: eBook Release Date: 15/10/2015

In the 1830s and 1840s the district of Glendale on the island of Skye was swamped by immigrants cleared from other north Skye estates. The resultant overcrowding and over-use of land caused simmering discontent - not against the incomers, but against the landowners, who regarded their tenants as no more than chattels. This book is a definitive account of what happened when the powder-keg erupted and a full-scale land-war ensued. Pitched battles with police, factors and bailiffs, military intervention, arrests, trials, imprisonment and the personal intervention of the Prime Minister were to have huge consequences for crofters all over the Highlands, who, ultimately, were the victors. At the heart of the rising was a man named John MacPherson of Lower Milovaig in Glendale, a courageous, charismatic and articulate crofter who was twice imprisoned for leading a rebellion against a system which kept all but the wealthiest in a state of bitter servitude. MacPherson quickly became known as 'the Glendale Martyr'. Martyrs tells the story of John MacPherson, his comrades, his allies, his enemies and his final success.

Martyrs Glendale and the Revolution in Skye

Martyrs Glendale and the Revolution in Skye

Author: Roger Hutchinson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 09/10/2015

In the 1830s and 1840s the district of Glendale on the island of Skye was swamped by immigrants cleared from other north Skye estates. The resultant overcrowding and over-use of land caused simmering discontent - not against the incomers, but against the landowners, who regarded their tenants as no more than chattels. This book is a definitive account of what happened when the powder-keg erupted and a full-scale land-war ensued. Pitched battles with police, factors and bailiffs, military intervention, arrests, trials, imprisonment and the personal intervention of the Prime Minister were to have huge consequences for crofters all over the Highlands, who, ultimately, were the victors. At the heart of the rising was a man named John MacPherson of Lower Milovaig in Glendale, a courageous, charismatic and articulate crofter who was twice imprisoned for leading a rebellion against a system which kept all but the wealthiest in a state of bitter servitude. MacPherson quickly became known as 'the Glendale Martyr'. Martyrs tells the story of John MacPherson, his comrades, his allies, his enemies and his final success.

St Kilda A People's History

St Kilda A People's History

Author: Roger Hutchinson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/10/2015

St Kilda is the most romantic and most romanticised group of islands in Europe. Soaring out of the North Atlantic Ocean like Atlantis come back to life, the islands have captured the imagination of the outside world for hundreds of years. Their inhabitants, Scottish Gaels who lived off the land, the sea and by birdcatching on high and precipitous cliffs, were long considered to be the Noble Savages of the British Isles, living in a state of natural grace. St Kilda: A People's History explores and portrays the life of the St Kildans from the Stone Age to 1930, when the remaining 36 islanderswere evacuated to the Scottish mainland. Bestselling author Roger Hutchinson digs deep into the archives to paint a vivid picture of the life and death, work and play of a small, proud and self-sufficient people in the first modern book to chart the history of the most remote islands in Britain.

The Silent Weaver The Extraordinary Life and Work of Angus MacPhee

The Silent Weaver The Extraordinary Life and Work of Angus MacPhee

Author: Roger Hutchinson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/09/2011

In September 1939, groups of horsemen in battledress cantered down a broad, grassy plain on the western edge of Europe. The young men of the Western Isles were going to war again. They included a tall, shy 24-year-old called Angus MacPhee (1916-97). Angus returned from war alive but in chronic mental pain and was referred to the asylum in Inverness, where he spent the next 50 years of his life there. During his time at Craig Dunain Hospital, he retreated into his own silent world, and did not speak again until shortly before his death. But 'the quiet big man' as he was known spent his time creating a huge number of objects out of woven grass, sheep's wool and beach leaves - mostly clothes, caps and hats - which he then let decay or deliberately burned. Only when an art therapist discovered him and his miraculous creations were some of them preserved for posterity. And only then did Angus MacPhee come home to South Uist, where he died a year later. The Silent Weaver is a rich, moving and enthralling exploration of mental health, the creative process, human frailty and ancient traditions.

The Works of Roger Hutchinson

The Works of Roger Hutchinson

Author: Roger Hutchinson Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/05/2011

The Works of Roger Hutchinson

The Works of Roger Hutchinson

Author: Roger Hutchinson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/05/2011

The Toon The Complete History of Newcastle United Football Club

The Toon The Complete History of Newcastle United Football Club

Author: Roger Hutchinson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 08/10/2010

This is the full, unofficial and uncensored story of one of the greatest football clubs in the world. It brings to life the sensational early successes of the great Anglo-Scottish team before the First World War and follows the club's successes as Cup giants in the 1950s and European conquerors in the 60s, to the Macdonald and Keegan squads of the 1970s and '80s, to its rebirth in the 1990s and through its trials and tribulations of the first decade of the 21st century. Exploring and explaining the lean years as well as the successful decades, Roger Hutchinson brilliantly portrays the managers and players throughout the club's long history and brings the story right up to date as, after the relegation traumas of 2008/09, Newcastle United looks forward to a resurgence in their fortunes as they return to the Premiership in 2010.

Father Allan

Father Allan

Author: Roger Hutchinson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 23/09/2010

Early on a Sunday morning in October 1905, in Eriskay, one of the smallest and most isolated of Hebridean islands, a forty-five year old Catholic parish priest died of pleurisy. It was a disease which had claimed many of his parishioners, and Father Allan McDonald undoubtedly contracted it while ministering to his flock. He was mourned all over Scotland. Now, over a century later, his name is still remembered with reverence throughout Catholic Scotland and beyond. Father Allan - Maighstir Ailein to his Gaelic-speaking people - was a witty, accomplished, intellectual and dedicated man; one of the most renowned of Hebridean personalities and probably the most celebrated Hebridean priest since St Columba. An exceptionally effective and articulate local politician in the southern Outer Hebrides, which at the turn of the twentieth century was amongst the poorest and most neglected in Europe, he was also an accomplished Gaelic poet and writer and one of Scotland's greatest collectors of folklore. His achievements attracted attention and visitors came to his lonely parish from the United States, England and elsewhere. The compelling tale of his remarkable life is also implicitly the story of the north-west Highlands in the late nineteenth century and the Catholic Hebrides in their transcendent prime, where culture overflows with myth and adventure, colour, character and extraordinary unspoilt beauty.

Calum's Road

Calum's Road

Author: Roger Hutchinson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 27/05/2008

Calum MacLeod had lived on the northern point of Raasay since his birth in 1911. He tended the Rona lighthouse at the very tip of his little archipelago, until semi-automation in 1967 reduced his responsibilities. 'So what he decided to do', says his last neighbour, Donald MacLeod, 'was to build a road out of Arnish in his months off. With a road he hoped new generations of people would return to Arnish and all the north end of Raasay'. And so, at the age of 56, Calum MacLeod, the last man left in northern Raasay, set about single-handedly constructing the 'impossible' road. It would become a romantic, quixotic venture, a kind of sculpture; an obsessive work of art so perfect in every gradient, culvert and supporting wall that its creation occupied almost twenty years of his life. In Calum's Road , Roger Hutchinson recounts the extraordinary story of this remarkable man's devotion to his visionary project.

Prophets, Pastors and Public Choices

Prophets, Pastors and Public Choices

Author: Roger Hutchinson Format: eBook Release Date: 01/01/2006

The Mackenzie Valley natural gas pipeline debate included many actors. This is the first in-depth study in comparative religious ethics to examine the debate with a particular focus on the role of the Canadian churches. In 1974 twenty-seven of the worlds largest oil and natural gas companies applied for permission to build a pipeline through the Mackenzie Valley to transport Alaskan and northern Canadian gas to large southern markets. Many northern native peoples opposed the proposal and called for a moratorium on major northern development projects until native land claims had been settled. The mainline Canadian Christian churches supported the call for a moratorium and, through the interchurch coalition, Project North, campaigned against the pipeline. However, some native peoples supported the proposal to build the pipeline, and many of the pipelines proponents were members of churches that called for a moratorium on the project. This case study in comparative religious ethics, though written from a pro-moratorium stand, attempts to clarify the debate. Conflicting responses to the pipeline proposal are assessed in relation to hard facts concerning the need for northern gas in the South, social-scientific findings regarding the impact of the pipeline on native communities, the rights of native peoples to participate in decisions affecting their lives, assumptions about the way of life of non-native people in the South and the role of religious convictions in public choices. This thoroughly researched study reveals the inner workings and influences of the Canadian churches involved and illustrates their commitment on behalf of the northern natives opposed to the project.

The Soap Man Lewis, Harris and Lord Leverhulme

The Soap Man Lewis, Harris and Lord Leverhulme

Author: Roger Hutchinson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/11/2005

In 1918, as the First World War was drawing to a close, the eminent liberal industrial Lord Leverhulme bought - lock, stock and barrel - the Hebridean island of Lewis. His intention was to revolutionise the lives and environments of its 30,000 people, and those of neighbouring Harris, which he shortly added to his estate. For the next five years a state of conflict reigned in the Hebrides. Island seamen and servicemen returned from the war to discover a new landlord whose declared aim was to uproot their identity as independent crofter/fishermen and turn them into tenured wage-owners. They fought back, and this is the story of that fight. The confrontation resulted in riot and land seizure and imprisonment for the islanders and the ultimate defeat for one of the most powerful men of his day. The Soap Man paints a beguiling portrait of the driven figure of Lord Leverhulme, but also looks for the first time at the infantry of his opposition: the men and women of Lewis and Harris who for long hard years fought the law, their landowner, local business opinion and the entire media, to preserve the settled crofting population of their islands.

Polly The True Story Behind Whisky Galore

Polly The True Story Behind Whisky Galore

Author: Roger Hutchinson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 07/05/1998

Early on a wartime winter's morning in 1941, an 8,000-ton cargo ship loaded with whisky ran aground in the beautiful and treacherous seas of the Outer Hebrides. The events which followed became the stuff of folklore, and resulted in the famous fiction of Whisky Galore. But what really happened ...?

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