LoveReading

Becoming a member of the LoveReading community is free.

No catches, no fine print just unadulterated book loving, with your favourite books saved to your own digital bookshelf.

New members get entered into our monthly draw to win £100 to spend in your local bookshop Plus lots lots more…

Find out more

Audiobooks by Adam Nicolson

Browse audiobooks by Adam Nicolson, listen to samples and when you're ready head over to Audiobooks.com where you can get 3 FREE audiobooks on us

LoveReading Top 10

  1. The Therapist Audiobook The Therapist
    1
  2. The Dream Weavers Audiobook The Dream Weavers
    2
  3. Working Hard, Hardly Working: How to achieve more, stress less and feel fulfilled Audiobook Working Hard, Hardly Working: How to achieve more, stress less and feel fulfilled
    3
  4. The Summer Job: The most feel-good romcom of 2021 soon to be a TV series Audiobook The Summer Job: The most feel-good romcom of 2021 soon to be a TV series
    4
  5. Dreamland Audiobook Dreamland
    5
  6. The Wolf Den Audiobook The Wolf Den
    6
  7. Transcendent Kingdom Audiobook Transcendent Kingdom
    7
  8. The Boy, The Mole, The Fox and The Horse Audiobook The Boy, The Mole, The Fox and The Horse
    8
  9. One Two Three Four: The Beatles in Time Audiobook One Two Three Four: The Beatles in Time
    9
  10. Outlander 'International Edition' Audiobook Outlander 'International Edition'
    10
Filter
The Making of Poetry: Coleridge, the Wordsworths and Their Year of Marvels Audiobook

The Making of Poetry: Coleridge, the Wordsworths and Their Year of Marvels

Author: Adam Nicolson Narrator: Roger Davis Release Date: May 2019

Wordsworth and Coleridge as you've never seen them before in this new book by Adam Nicolson, brimming with poetry, art and nature writing. Proof that poetry can change the world. It is the most famous year in English poetry. Out of it came The Ancient Mariner and 'Kubla Khan', as well as Coleridge's unmatched hymns to friendship and fatherhood, Wordsworth's revolutionary verses in Lyrical Ballads and the greatness of 'Tintern Abbey', his paean to the unity of soul and cosmos, love and understanding.  Bestselling and award-winning writer Adam Nicolson tells the story, almost day by day, of the year in the late 1790s that Coleridge, Wordsworth, his sister Dorothy and an ever-shifting cast of friends, dependants and acolytes spent together in the Quantock Hills in Somerset. To a degree never shown before, The Making of Poetry explores the idea that these poems came from this place, and that only by experiencing the physical circumstances of the year, in all weathers and all seasons, at night and at dawn, in sunlit reverie and moonlit walks, can the genesis of the poetry start to be understood.   What emerges is a portrait of these great figures as young people, troubled, ambitious, dreaming of a vision of wholeness, knowing they had greatness in them but still in urgent search of the paths towards it.  The poetry they made was not from settled conclusions but from the adventure on which they were all embarked, seeing what they wrote as a way of stripping away all the dead matter, exfoliating consciousness, penetrating its depths. Poetry for them was not an ornament for civilisation but a challenge to it, a means of remaking the world.

Show more
The Seabird's Cry Audiobook

The Seabird's Cry

Author: Adam Nicolson Narrator: Dugald Bruce Lockhart Release Date: February 2018

Life itself could never have been sustainable without seabirds. As Adam Nicolson writes: "They are bringers of fertility, the deliverers of life from ocean to land." A global tragedy is unfolding. Even as we are coming to understand them, the number of seabirds on our planet is in freefall, dropping by nearly 70% in the last sixty years, a billion fewer now than there were in 1950. Of the ten birds in this audiobook, seven are in decline, at least in part of their range. Extinction stalks the ocean and there is a danger that the grand cry of the seabird colony, rolling around the bays and headlands of high latitudes, will this century become little but a memory. Seabirds have always entranced the human imagination and NYT best-selling author Adam Nicolson has been in love with them all his life: for their mastery of wind and ocean, their aerial beauty and the unmatched wildness of the coasts and islands where every summer they return to breed. The seabird's cry comes from an elemental layer in the story of the world. Over the last couple of decades, modern science has begun to understand their epic voyages, their astonishing abilities to navigate for tens of thousands of miles on featureless seas, their ability to smell their way towards fish and home. Only the poets in the past would have thought of seabirds as creatures riding the ripples and currents of the entire planet, but that is what the scientists are seeing now today. CONNECT WITH THE AUTHOR Adam Nicolson Dugald Bruce Lockhart

Show more
The Seabird's Cry: The Lives and Loves of Puffins, Gannets and Other Ocean Voyagers Audiobook

The Seabird's Cry: The Lives and Loves of Puffins, Gannets and Other Ocean Voyagers

Author: Adam Nicolson Narrator: Dugald Bruce-Lockhart Release Date: June 2017

WINNER OF THE WAINWRIGHT PRIZE 2018 SHORTLISTED FOR THE JEFFERIES AWARD FOR NATURE WRITING 2017 The full story of seabirds from one of the greatest nature writers. The book looks at the pattern of their lives, their habitats, the threats they face and the passions they inspire - beautifully illustrated by Kate Boxer. Seabirds are master navigators, thriving in the most demanding environment on earth. In this masterly book, drawing on all the most recent research, Adam Nicolson follows them to the coasts and islands of Scotland, Ireland, Iceland, Norway, and the Americas. Beautifully illustrated by Kate Boxer, The Seabird's Cry is a celebration of the wonders of the only creatures at home in the air, on land and on the sea. It also carries a warning: the number of seabirds has dropped by two-thirds since 1950. Extinction stalks the ocean and there is a danger that the grand cry of a seabird colony will this century become little but a memory.

Show more
Why Homer Matters Audiobook

Why Homer Matters

Author: Adam Nicolson Narrator: John Lee Release Date: March 2015

Why Homer Matters is a magical journey of discovery across wide stretches of the past, sewn together by Homer's poems and their metaphors of life and trouble.

Show more
The Mighty Dead Audiobook

The Mighty Dead

Author: Adam Nicolson Narrator: Dugald Bruce Lockhart Release Date: February 2015

Longlisted for the 2014 Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction'A thrilling and complex book, enlarges our view of Homer ... There's something that hits the mark on every page' Claire Tomalin, Books of the Year, New StatesmanWhere does Homer come from? And why does Homer matter? His epic poems of war and suffering can still speak to us of the role of destiny in life, of cruelty, of humanity and its frailty, but why they do is a mystery. How can we be so intimate with something so distant?'The Mighty Dead' is a magical journey of discovery across wide stretches of the past, sewn together by some of the oldest stories we have - the great ancient poems of Homer and their metaphors of life and trouble. In this provocative and enthralling book, Adam Nicolson explains why Homer still matters and how these vital, epic verses - with their focus on the eternal questions about the individual versus the community, honour and service, love and war - tell us how we became who we are.

Show more
God's Secretaries: The Making of the King James Bible Audiobook

God's Secretaries: The Making of the King James Bible

Author: Adam Nicolson Narrator: Clive Chafer Release Date: May 2012

A net of complex currents flowed across Jacobean England. This was the England of Shakespeare, Jonson, and Bacon; the Gunpowder Plot; the worst outbreak of the plague England had ever seen; arcadian landscapes; murderous, toxic slums; and, above all, sometimes overwhelming religious passion. Jacobean England was both more godly and less godly than it had ever been, and the entire culture was drawn taut between the polarities. This was the world that created the King James Bible. It is the greatest work of English prose ever written, and it is no coincidence that the translation was made at the moment "Englishness" and the English language had come into its first passionate maturity. Boisterous, elegant, subtle, majestic, finely nuanced, sonorous, and musical, the English of Jacobean England has a more encompassing idea of its own reach and scope than any before or since. It is a form of the language that drips with potency and sensitivity. The age, with all its conflicts, explains the book. The sponsor and guide of the whole Bible project was the king himself, the brilliant, ugly, and profoundly peace-loving James the Sixth of Scotland and First of England. Trained almost from birth to manage the rivalries of political factions at home, James saw in England the chance for a sort of irenic Eden over which the new translation of the Bible was to preside. It was to be a Bible for everyone, and as God's lieutenant on earth, he would use it to unify his kingdom. The dream of Jacobean peace, guaranteed by an elision of royal power and divine glory, lies behind a Bible of extraordinary grace and everlasting literary power. "This scrupulously elegant account of the creation of what four centuries of history has confirmed is the finest English-language work of all time is entirely true to its subject: Adam Nicolson's lapidary prose is masterly, his measured account both as readable as the curious demand and as dignified as the story deserves."-Simon Winchester, New York Times bestselling author

Show more
The Gentry Audiobook

The Gentry

Author: Adam Nicolson Narrator: David Fleeshman Release Date: October 2011

Prize-winning author Adam Nicolson tells the story he was born to write - the real story of England. It is the gentry that has made England what it was and, to a degree, still is. In this vivid, lively book, history has never been more readable.We may well be 'a nation of shopkeepers', but for generations England was a country dominated by its middling families, rooted on their land, in their locality, with a healthy interest in turning a profit from their property and a deep distrust of the centralised state. The virtues we may all believe to be part of the English culture - honesty, affability, courtesy, liberality - each of these has their source in gentry life cultivated over five hundred years. These folk were the backbone of England.Adam Nicolson's riveting new book concentrates on fourteen families with a time-span from 1400 to the present day. From the medieval gung-ho of the Plumpton family to the high-seas adventures of the Lascelles in the 18th-century, to more modern examples, the book provides a chronological picture of the English, seen through these intimate, passionate, powerful stories of family saga. The families have been selected from all over the country and range from the famous to the unknown. Some families are divided by politics , such as the family that took different sides in the Reformation; others destroy their inheritance through reckless gambling or investments . All of them are vivid depictions of the life and code of the gentry, and have left deep archives of family papers which the author has been able to use, often for the very first time.THE GENTRY is first and foremost a wonderful sweep of English history. It presents a convincing argument on what has created the distinctive English character but with the sheer readability of an epic novel.

Show more
Quarrel with the King: The Story of an English Family on the High Road to Civil War Audiobook

Quarrel with the King: The Story of an English Family on the High Road to Civil War

Author: Adam Nicolson Narrator: Simon Vance, Simon Vance Release Date: November 2008

Spanning England's most turbulent and dramatic decades—from the 1520s to the 1640s—Quarrel with the King tells the story of four generations of one of the greatest families in English history, the Pembrokes, and follows their glamorous trajectory across 130 years of change, ambition, resistance, and war. As he tells their story, Adam Nicolson reveals how a struggle for dominance began as the English crown slowly grew in strength and power, which evoked questions of loyalty that would simmer for decades. Was government about agreement and respect or authority and compulsion? What status did traditional rights have in a changing world? Did a national emergency mean those rights could be ignored or overturned? These were the questions that, in 1642, would lead to a brutal civil war, the bloodiest conflict England has ever suffered, in which the Earl of Pembroke—a devout subject—had no choice but to rebel against a king he believed had betrayed him and his country.

Show more