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Sarah Covington - Author

About the Author

Books by Sarah Covington

Protestant Aesthetics and the Arts

Protestant Aesthetics and the Arts

Author: Sarah Covington Format: Hardback Release Date: 17/02/2020

The Reformation was one of the defining cultural turning points in Western history, even if there is a longstanding stereotype that Protestants did away with art and material culture. Rather than reject art and aestheticism, Protestants developed their own aesthetic values, which Protestant Aesthetics and the Arts addresses as it identifies and explains the link between theological aesthetics and the arts within a Protestant framework across five-hundred years of history. Featuring essays from an international gathering of leading experts working across a diverse set of disciplines, Protestant Aesthetics and the Arts is the first study of its kind, containing essays that address Protestantism and the fine arts (visual art, music, literature, and architecture), and historical and contemporary Protestant theological perspectives on the subject of beauty and imagination. Contributors challenge accepted preconceptions relating to the boundaries of theological aesthetics and religiously determined art; disrupt traditional understandings of periodization and disciplinarity; and seek to open rich avenues for new fields of research. Building on renewed interest in Protestantism in the study of religion and modernity and the return to aesthetics in Christian theological inquiry, this volume will be of significant interest to scholars of Theology, Aesthetics, Art and Architectural History, Literary Criticism, and Religious History.

Wounds, Flesh, and Metaphor in Seventeenth-Century England

Wounds, Flesh, and Metaphor in Seventeenth-Century England

Author: Sarah Covington Format: Hardback Release Date: 02/10/2009

Wounds, Flesh and Metaphor in Seventeenth-Century England explores the theme of physical and symbolic woundedness in mid-seventeenth century English literature. This book demonstrates the ways in which writers attempted to represent the politically and religiously fractured state of the time and re-imagined the nation through language and metaphor in the process. By examining the creative permutations of the wound metaphor, Covington argues for the centrality of the charged imagery, and language itself, in shaping the self-representations of an age.

Trail Of Martyrdom Persecution and Resistance in Sixteenth-Century England

Trail Of Martyrdom Persecution and Resistance in Sixteenth-Century England

Author: Sarah Covington Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/11/2003

This work examines the stages by which religious dissidents were persecuted by Tudor monarchs across the 16th century, and the means by which these dissidents counteracted authorities. During each stage of persecution, many dissidents were able to elude capture, counter-interrogate their inquisitors, use time in prison to write letters and prepare for death, and exploit their own executions to forge a final drama of suffering and redemption before a large, public audience. Enforcement was always dependent upon cooperation from the public and local officials, which made successful persecution uncertain at best. This text explores the details of this system of enforcement, and the means by which it was subverted. It also discusses larger questions concerning obedience and disobedience, tolerance and intolerance, and the dynamics of martyrdom.

Trail Of Martyrdom Persecution and Resistance in Sixteenth-Century England

Trail Of Martyrdom Persecution and Resistance in Sixteenth-Century England

Author: Sarah Covington Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/11/2003

This work examines the stages by which religious dissidents were persecuted by Tudor monarchs across the 16th century, and the means by which these dissidents counteracted authorities. During each stage of persecution, many dissidents were able to elude capture, counter-interrogate their inquisitors, use time in prison to write letters and prepare for death, and exploit their own executions to forge a final drama of suffering and redemption before a large, public audience. Enforcement was always dependent upon cooperation from the public and local officials, which made successful persecution uncertain at best. This text explores the details of this system of enforcement, and the means by which it was subverted. It also discusses larger questions concerning obedience and disobedience, tolerance and intolerance, and the dynamics of martyrdom.