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Karl F. Morrison - Author

About the Author

Books by Karl F. Morrison

Conversion and Text

Conversion and Text

Author: Karl F. Morrison Format: Hardback Release Date: 22/08/2020

Interpreting three conversion accounts, Morrison accents the categorical difference between the experience of conversion and written narratives about it. He explains why experience and text can only be related to each other in fictive ways. The accounts are sample cases taken from different periods in Western history. The earliest and most famous, by Augustine of Hippo is from north Africa under the late Roman Empire. The next was written by Herman-Judah, a Jew who lived in Cologne in the 12th century, in the shadow of crusading pogroms. It is the first known autobiographical account of a conversion after Augustine's Confessions . The English translation in this book will make the text accessible to many readers for the first time. The latest account, by Constantine Tsatsos, president of the Hellenic Republic, is from 20th century Athens. Unlike the others, it is not autobiographical. By this and other contrasts, it highlights issues of criticism raised by the other two studies. In working out his critical case studies, Morrison raises such questions as whether one can assume that a conversion actually occurred because there is a text about it, and if so, whether one can accept the narrative as a historically accurate description of events. Taking the texts as imaginative renderings into words of experiences that could not be expressed, he examines what the authors suppressed as well as what they told, and their guiding motives. He presents the narratives as deliberate fabrications calculated to achieve specific objectives. For all three writers , Morrison writes in his preface, concealment was a condition of the experience and the narrative of conversion. Despite their extreme differences, the hermeneutic project of conversion remained thinkable for them all because of metaphor, defined by tradition with a repertory of meanings...As writers, they took for granted the difference between what was called conversion and a fictive tale about it . The companion volume Understanding Conversion , outlines the critical framework for the method applied in Conversion and Text .

Tradition and Authority in the Western Church, 300-1140

Tradition and Authority in the Western Church, 300-1140

Author: Karl F. Morrison Format: Hardback Release Date: 20/06/2019

Beginning with the conversion of Constantine in 312 and the establishment of the Christian Empire, the book continues through the Middle Ages up to the publication of Gratian's Decretum, the great, systematic book of Church law which transformed the idea of tradition into legal concepts. Throughout this period the hierarchy was called upon to deal with such fundamental questions as the nature of tradition and the extent of its authority, the infallibility of the pope, and the proper role of the laity in defining dogma. Originally published in 1969. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The Mimetic Tradition of Reform in the West

The Mimetic Tradition of Reform in the West

Author: Karl F. Morrison Format: Hardback Release Date: 19/04/2016

Ancient writers distinguished between art and style, arguing that free imitation was a critical strategy that freed artists from servile copying of objects and blind submission to rules of style. In this study Karl F. Morrison explores the far-reaching consequences of this distinction Originally published in 1982. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

I Am You

I Am You

Author: Karl F. Morrison Format: Hardback Release Date: 19/04/2016

Important trends in contemporary intellectual life celebrate difference, divisiveness, and distinction. Speculative writing increasingly highlights hermeneutic gaps between human beings, their histories, and their hopes. In this book Karl Morrison identifies an alternative to this disruption. He explores for the first time the entire legacy of thought revolving around the challenging claim I am you --perhaps the most concise possible statement of bonding through empathy. Professor Morrison shows that the hope for thoroughgoing understanding and inclusion in another's world view is central to the West's moral/intellectual tradition. He maintains that the West may yet escape the fatal flaw of casting that hope in paradigms of sexual and aesthetic dominance--examples of empathetic participation inspired by hunger for power, as well as by love. The author uses diverse sources: in theology ranging from Augustine to Schleiermacher, in art from the religious art of the Christian Empire to post-Abstractionism, and in literature from Donne to Joyce, Pirandello, and Mann. In this work he builds on the thought of two earlier books: Tradition and Authority in the Western Church: 300-1140 (Princeton, 1969) and The Mimetic Tradition of Reform in the West (Princeton, 1982). I Am You goes beyond their themes to the inward act that, according to tradition, consummated the change achieved by mimesis: namely, empathetic participation. Originally published in 1988. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Two Kingdoms

Two Kingdoms

Author: Karl F. Morrison Format: Hardback Release Date: 19/04/2016

The Two Kingdoms treats a major achievement of the Carolingian Renaissance, Frankish ecclesiology, and the influence of 9th-century ecclesiology upon contemporary political thought. Dr. Morrison focuses particularly on the argument that, in this world, government was divided between the earthly kingdom and the kingdom of the Church. Originally published in 1964. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

History as a Visual Art in the Twelfth-Century Renaissance

History as a Visual Art in the Twelfth-Century Renaissance

Author: Karl F. Morrison Format: Hardback Release Date: 19/04/2016

Karl Morrison discusses historical writing at a turning point in European culture: the so-called Renaissance of the twelfth century. Why do texts considered at that time to be masterpieces seem now to be fragmentary and full of contradictions? Morrison maintains that the answer comes from ideas about art. Viewing histories as artifacts made according to the same aesthetic principles as paintings and theater, he shows that twelfth-century authors and audiences found unity not in what the reason read in a text but in what the imagination read into it: they prized visual over verbal imagination and employed a circular, or nuclear, spectator-centered perspective cast aside in the Renaissance of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Twelfth-century writers assimilated and transformed a tradition of the conceptual unity of all the arts and attributed that unity to the fact that art both conceals and discloses. Recovering that tradition, especially the methods and motives of concealment, provides extraordinary insights into twelfth-century ideas about the kingdom of God, the status of women, and the nature of time itself. It also identifies a strain in European thought that had striking affinities to methods of perception familiar in Oriental religions and that proved to be antithetic to later humanist traditions in the West. Originally published in 1990. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Tradition and Authority in the Western Church, 300-1140

Tradition and Authority in the Western Church, 300-1140

Author: Karl F. Morrison Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 08/12/2015

Beginning with the conversion of Constantine in 312 and the establishment of the Christian Empire, the book continues through the Middle Ages up to the publication of Gratian's Decretum, the great, systematic book of Church law which transformed the idea of tradition into legal concepts. Throughout this period the hierarchy was called upon to deal with such fundamental questions as the nature of tradition and the extent of its authority, the infallibility of the pope, and the proper role of the laity in defining dogma. Originally published in 1969. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Two Kingdoms

Two Kingdoms

Author: Karl F. Morrison Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 08/12/2015

The Two Kingdoms treats a major achievement of the Carolingian Renaissance, Frankish ecclesiology, and the influence of 9th-century ecclesiology upon contemporary political thought. Dr. Morrison focuses particularly on the argument that, in this world, government was divided between the earthly kingdom and the kingdom of the Church. Originally published in 1964. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

I Am You

I Am You

Author: Karl F. Morrison Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/07/2014

Important trends in contemporary intellectual life celebrate difference, divisiveness, and distinction. Speculative writing increasingly highlights hermeneutic gaps between human beings, their histories, and their hopes. In this book Karl Morrison identifies an alternative to this disruption. He explores for the first time the entire legacy of thought revolving around the challenging claim I am you --perhaps the most concise possible statement of bonding through empathy. Professor Morrison shows that the hope for thoroughgoing understanding and inclusion in another's world view is central to the West's moral/intellectual tradition. He maintains that the West may yet escape the fatal flaw of casting that hope in paradigms of sexual and aesthetic dominance--examples of empathetic participation inspired by hunger for power, as well as by love. The author uses diverse sources: in theology ranging from Augustine to Schleiermacher, in art from the religious art of the Christian Empire to post-Abstractionism, and in literature from Donne to Joyce, Pirandello, and Mann. In this work he builds on the thought of two earlier books: Tradition and Authority in the Western Church: 300-1140 (Princeton, 1969) and The Mimetic Tradition of Reform in the West (Princeton, 1982). I Am You goes beyond their themes to the inward act that, according to tradition, consummated the change achieved by mimesis: namely, empathetic participation. Originally published in 1988. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

History as a Visual Art in the Twelfth-Century Renaissance

History as a Visual Art in the Twelfth-Century Renaissance

Author: Karl F. Morrison Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/07/2014

Karl Morrison discusses historical writing at a turning point in European culture: the so-called Renaissance of the twelfth century. Why do texts considered at that time to be masterpieces seem now to be fragmentary and full of contradictions? Morrison maintains that the answer comes from ideas about art. Viewing histories as artifacts made according to the same aesthetic principles as paintings and theater, he shows that twelfth-century authors and audiences found unity not in what the reason read in a text but in what the imagination read into it: they prized visual over verbal imagination and employed a circular, or nuclear, spectator-centered perspective cast aside in the Renaissance of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Twelfth-century writers assimilated and transformed a tradition of the conceptual unity of all the arts and attributed that unity to the fact that art both conceals and discloses. Recovering that tradition, especially the methods and motives of concealment, provides extraordinary insights into twelfth-century ideas about the kingdom of God, the status of women, and the nature of time itself. It also identifies a strain in European thought that had striking affinities to methods of perception familiar in Oriental religions and that proved to be antithetic to later humanist traditions in the West. Originally published in 1990. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The Mimetic Tradition of Reform in the West

The Mimetic Tradition of Reform in the West

Author: Karl F. Morrison Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/07/2014

Ancient writers distinguished between art and style, arguing that free imitation was a critical strategy that freed artists from servile copying of objects and blind submission to rules of style. In this study Karl F. Morrison explores the far-reaching consequences of this distinction Originally published in 1982. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Imperial Lives and Letters of the Eleventh Century

Imperial Lives and Letters of the Eleventh Century

Author: Karl F. Morrison Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/06/2000

-- Thomas F. X. Noble, University of Virginia

Church in the Roman Empire

Church in the Roman Empire

Author: Karl F. Morrison Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/03/1986

The University of Chicago Readings in Western Civilization (nine volumes) makes available to students and teachers a unique selection of primary documents, many in new translations. These readings, prepared for the highly praised Western civilization sequence at the University of Chicago, were chosen by an outstanding group of scholars whose experience teaching that course spans almost four decades. Each volume includes rarely anthologized selections as well as standard, more familiar texts; a bibliography of recommended parallel readings; and introductions providing background for the selections. Beginning with Periclean Athens and concluding with twentieth-century Europe, these source materials enable teachers and students to explore a variety of critical approaches to important events and themes in Western history. Individual volumes provide essential background reading for courses covering specific eras and periods. The complete nine-volume series is ideal for general courses in history and Western civilization sequences.