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Howard P. Chudacoff - Author

About the Author

Books by Howard P. Chudacoff

The Evolution of American Urban Society

The Evolution of American Urban Society

Author: Howard P. Chudacoff Format: Hardback Release Date: 25/08/2017

This interesting and informative book shows how different groups of urban residents with different social, economic, and political power cope with the urban environment, struggle to make a living, participate in communal institutions, and influence the direction of cities and urban life. An absorbing book, The Evolution of American Urban Society surveys the dynamics of American urbanization from the sixteenth century to the present, skilfully blending historical perspectives on society, economics, politics, and policy, and focusing on the ways in which diverse peoples have inhabited and interacted in cities. Key topics: Broad coverage includes: the Colonial Age, commercialization and urban expansion, life in the walking city, industrialization, newcomers, city politics, the social and physical environment, the 1920s and 1930s, the growth of suburbanization, and the future of modern cities. Market: An interesting and necessary read for anyone involved in urban sociology, including urban planners, city managers, and those in the urban political arena.

Changing the Playbook How Power, Profit, and Politics Transformed College Sports

Changing the Playbook How Power, Profit, and Politics Transformed College Sports

Author: Howard P. Chudacoff Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/12/2015

In Changing the Playbook , Howard P. Chudacoff delves into the background and what-ifs surrounding seven defining moments that transformed college sports. These changes involved fundamental issues--race and gender, profit and power--that reflected societal tensions and, in many cases, remain pertinent today: *the failed 1950 effort to pass a Sanity Code regulating payments to football players;*the thorny racial integration of university sports programs;*the boom in television money;*the 1984 Supreme Court decision that settled who could control skyrocketing media revenues;*Title IX's transformation of women's athletics;*the cheating, eligibility, and recruitment scandals that tarnished college sports in the 1980s and 1990s;*the ongoing controversy over paying student athletes a share of the enormous moneys harvested by schools and athletic departments.A thought-provoking journey into the whos and whys of college sports history, Changing the Playbook reveals how the turning points of yesterday and today will impact tomorrow.

Changing the Playbook How Power, Profit, and Politics Transformed College Sports

Changing the Playbook How Power, Profit, and Politics Transformed College Sports

Author: Howard P. Chudacoff Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 10/12/2015

In Changing the Playbook , Howard P. Chudacoff delves into the background and what-ifs surrounding seven defining moments that transformed college sports. These changes involved fundamental issues--race and gender, profit and power--that reflected societal tensions and, in many cases, remain pertinent today: *the failed 1950 effort to pass a Sanity Code regulating payments to football players;*the thorny racial integration of university sports programs;*the boom in television money;*the 1984 Supreme Court decision that settled who could control skyrocketing media revenues;*Title IX's transformation of women's athletics;*the cheating, eligibility, and recruitment scandals that tarnished college sports in the 1980s and 1990s;*the ongoing controversy over paying student athletes a share of the enormous moneys harvested by schools and athletic departments.A thought-provoking journey into the whos and whys of college sports history, Changing the Playbook reveals how the turning points of yesterday and today will impact tomorrow.

Children at Play An American History

Children at Play An American History

Author: Howard P. Chudacoff Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/09/2008

If you believe the experts, child's play ; is serious business. From sociologists to psychologists and from anthropologists to social critics, writers have produced mountains of books about the meaning and importance of play. But what do we know about how children actually play, especially American children of the last two centuries? In this fascinating and enlightening book, Howard Chudacoff presents a history of children's play in the United States and ponders what it tells us about ourselves. Through expert investigation in primary sources-including dozens of children's diaries, hundreds of autobiographical recollections of adults, and a wealth of child-rearing manuals-along with wide-ranging reading of the work of educators, journalists, market researchers, and scholars-Chudacoff digs into the underground of play. He contrasts the activities that genuinely occupied children's time with what adults thought children should be doing. Filled with intriguing stories and revelatory insights, Children at Play provides a chronological history of play in the U.S. from the point of view of children themselves. Focusing on youngsters between the ages of about six and twelve, this is history from the bottom up. It highlights the transformations of play that have occurred over the last 200 years, paying attention not only to the activities of the cultural elite but to those of working-class men and women, to slaves, and to Native Americans. In addition, the author considers the findings, observations, and theories of numerous social scientists along with those of fellow historians. Chudacoff concludes that children's ability to play independently has attenuated over time and that in our modern era this diminution has frequently had unfortunate consequences. By examining the activities of young people whom marketers today call tweens, he provides fresh historical depth to current discussions about topics like childhood obesity, delinquency, learning disability, and the many ways that children spend their time when adults aren't looking.

Children at Play An American History

Children at Play An American History

Author: Howard P. Chudacoff Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/08/2007

If you believe the experts, child's play ; is serious business. From sociologists to psychologists and from anthropologists to social critics, writers have produced mountains of books about the meaning and importance of play. But what do we know about how children actually play, especially American children of the last two centuries? In this fascinating and enlightening book, Howard Chudacoff presents a history of children's play in the United States and ponders what it tells us about ourselves. Through expert investigation in primary sources-including dozens of children's diaries, hundreds of autobiographical recollections of adults, and a wealth of child-rearing manuals-along with wide-ranging reading of the work of educators, journalists, market researchers, and scholars-Chudacoff digs into the underground of play. He contrasts the activities that genuinely occupied children's time with what adults thought children should be doing. Filled with intriguing stories and revelatory insights, Children at Play provides a chronological history of play in the U.S. from the point of view of children themselves. Focusing on youngsters between the ages of about six and twelve, this is history from the bottom up. It highlights the transformations of play that have occurred over the last 200 years, paying attention not only to the activities of the cultural elite but to those of working-class men and women, to slaves, and to Native Americans. In addition, the author considers the findings, observations, and theories of numerous social scientists along with those of fellow historians. Chudacoff concludes that children's ability to play independently has attenuated over time and that in our modern era this diminution has frequently had unfortunate consequences. By examining the activities of young people whom marketers today call tweens, he provides fresh historical depth to current discussions about topics like childhood obesity, delinquency, learning disability, and the many ways that children spend their time when adults aren't looking.

The Age of the Bachelor Creating an American Subculture

The Age of the Bachelor Creating an American Subculture

Author: Howard P. Chudacoff Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/08/2000

In this engaging new book, Howard Chudacoff describes a special and fascinating world: the urban bachelor life that took shape in the late nineteenth century, when a significant population of single men migrated to American cities. Rejecting the restraints and dependence of the nineteenth-century family, bachelors found sustenance and camaraderie in the boarding houses, saloons, pool halls, cafes, clubs, and other institutions that arose in response to their increasing numbers. Richly illustrated, anecdotal, and including a unique analysis of The National Police Gazette (the most outrageous and popular men's publication of the late nineteenth and the early twentieth century), this book is the first to describe a complex subculture that continues to affect the larger meanings of manhood and manliness in American society. The figure of the bachelor--with its emphasis on pleasure, self-indulgence, and public entertainment--was easily converted by the burgeoning consumer culture at the turn of the century into an ambiguously appealing image of masculinity. Finding an easy reception in an atmosphere of insecurity about manhood, that image has outdistanced the circumstances in which it began to flourish and far outlasted the bachelor culture that produced it. Thus, the idea of the bachelor has retained its somewhat negative but alluring connotations throughout the rest of the twentieth century. Chudacoff's concluding chapter discusses the contemporary singles scene now developing as the number of single people in urban centers is again increasing. By seeing bachelorhood as a stage in life for many and a permanent status for some, Chudacoff recalls a lifestyle that had a profound impact on society, evoking fear, disdain, repugnance, and at the same time a sense of romance, excitement, and freedom. The book contributes to gender history, family history, urban history, and the study of consumer culture and will appeal to anyone curious about American history and anxious to acquire a new view of a sometimes forgotten but still influential aspect of our national past.

How Old Are You? Age Consciousness in American Culture

How Old Are You? Age Consciousness in American Culture

Author: Howard P. Chudacoff Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 27/01/1992

Most Americans take it for granted that a thirteen-year-old in the fifth grade is behind schedule, that teenagers who marry too early are in for trouble, and that a seventy-five-year-old will be pleased at being told, You look young for your age. Did an awareness of age always dominate American life? Howard Chudacoff reveals that our intense age consciousness has developed only gradually since the late nineteenth century. In so doing, he explores a wide range of topics, including demographic change, the development of pediatrics and psychological testing, and popular music from the early 1800s until now. Throughout our lifetimes American society has been age-conscious. But this has not always been the case. Until the mid-nineteenth century, Americans showed little concern with age. The one-room schoolhouse was filled with students of varied ages, and children worked alongside adults...[This is] a lively picture of the development of age consciousness in urban middle-class culture. --Robert H. Binstock, The New York Times Book Review A fresh perspective on a century of social and cultural development. --Michael R. Dahlin, American Historical Review