Stephen Bates - Author

About the Author

Stephen Bates was a journalist for 36 years until 2012, working for the BBC, Daily Telegraph and Daily Mail before joining the Guardian. A regular broadcaster, he has also written for the Spectator, New Statesman, Time magazine, the Tablet, the Church Times, History Today, BBC History Magazine and foreign publications. Royalty Inc. is Stephen Bates's eighth book. He is married, with three grown-up children and now lives on the Kent coast.

Featured books by Stephen Bates

Other books by Stephen Bates

God's Own Country Religion and Politics in the USA

God's Own Country Religion and Politics in the USA

Author: Stephen Bates Format: Paperback Release Date: 26/07/2018

Right-wing evangelical Christianity has come to dominate American political and social life in recent years, dividing the country and sparking cultural and moral battles. High politics and low tactics frame a fierce debate which goes much further back in the country's history than the accession of George W. Bush in 2001. It's a battle that sears America's soul and affects the world. In this book Stephen Bates explains why what happens in the Bible Belt matters to us and how there are those who hope to export the battle to Britain. American fundamentalist religion has the potential to impact on crucial and acutely dangerous areas of the world. Its priorities are often arcane and sometimes weird. But it is already affecting American government policy at home and abroad: not least in Israel and the Middle East. How is religion affecting the current presidential elections and where will America's battle for its soul take the world next?

Aufsatze 3: Sergison Bates Architects

Aufsatze 3: Sergison Bates Architects

Author: Stephen Bates, Jonathan Sergison Format: Hardback Release Date: 24/08/2016

Following Papers and Papers 2, the third volume in the series contains papers written by Jonathan Sergison and Stephen Bates between 2008 and 2014. Illustrated with photographs and drawings, the papers focus on some of the themes that are at the heart of the work of Sergison Bates architects and their approach to architectural practice, such as domesticity, typology and density.

Papers Sergison Bates Architects

Papers Sergison Bates Architects

Author: Stephen Bates, Jonathan Sergison Format: Paperback Release Date: 27/07/2016

Following Papers and Papers 2, the third volume in the series contains papers written by Jonathan Sergison and Stephen Bates between 2008 and 2014. Illustrated with photographs and drawings, the papers focus on some of the themes that are at the heart of the work of Sergison Bates architects and their approach to architectural practice, such as domesticity, typology and density.

Royalty Inc. Britain's Best-Known Brand

Royalty Inc. Britain's Best-Known Brand

Author: Stephen Bates Format: Paperback Release Date: 23/10/2015

It is an amazing feat in the 21st century that Queen Elizabeth II, a small woman in her late - eighties, should be one of the most recognisable people on the planet. Her voice is redolent of another era, her interests are esoteric to many of her people, her opinions on anything from the weather to politics are almost entirely unknown, and her whole life has been lived without ever mingling on equal terms with anybody, except for one heady evening in 1945 when she slipped out of Buckingham Palace incognito to join the crowds celebrating the end of the war in Europe. The world has utterly, irreversibly, and radically evolved since she ascended the throne in 1952 and yet, in an era of instant celebrity, she remains, more popular than ever and seemingly largely unchanged: a bastion of certainty and comfort to the British and many other people during uncertain times. On 9th September 2015, she will beat Queen Victoria's record and become the longest - reigning monarch in British history. The question is: How secure is the British Royal Family? How much depends on the person of the Queen herself, and how much on the institution? To answer these questions, Royalty Inc. will combine a history of the British Crown's evolution thorugh the modern age with a journalistic peek behind the curtain at the machinery that sustains the Windsors today. Written by the Guardian's former Royal correspondent, its line will be neither royalist nor republican. Instead it will take a clear - eyed look at a host of issues, including the future of the Commonwealth, the Monarchy's role in the British constitution and class system, Prince Charles' notorious 'black spider memos', the true scale of the Royal finances, the legacy of Diana, and the problems and pressures faced by any heir to the throne in the future.

1815: Regency Britain in the Year of Waterloo

1815: Regency Britain in the Year of Waterloo

Author: Stephen Bates Format: Hardback Release Date: 29/01/2015

1815 was the year of Waterloo, the British victory that ended Napoleon's European ambitions and ushered in a century of peace for Britain. But what sort of country were Wellington's troops fighting for? And what kind of society did they return to? Overseas, the bounds of Empire were expanding; at home the population endured the chill of economic recession. As Jane Austen busied herself with the writing of Emma, John Nash designed Regent Street and Lord's cricket ground held its first match in St John's Wood, a nervous government infiltrated dissident political movements and resorted to repressive legislation to curb free speech. Interweaving first-hand accounts of personal experiences with the major trends and events of a momentous twelve months, 1815 offers a richly engrossing picture of a year that resonates to a surprising degree with the Britain of today.

Year of Waterloo

Year of Waterloo

Author: Stephen Bates Format: eBook Release Date: 29/01/2015

1815 was the year of Waterloo, the British victory that ended Napoleon's European ambitions and ushered in a century largely of peace for Britain. But what sort of country were Wellington's troops fighting for? And what kind of society did they return to? Stephen Bates paints a vivid portrait of every aspect of Britain in 1815. Overseas, the bounds of Empire were expanding;while at home the population endured the chill of economic recession. As Jane Austen busied herself with the writing of Emma, John Nash designed Regent Street, Humphrey Davy patented his safety lamp for miners and Lord's cricket ground held its first match in St John's Wood, and a nervous government infiltrated dissident political movements and resorted to repressive legislation to curb free speech. The Year In series gets to the heart of social and cultural life in the UK at key points in its history.

Two Nations Britain in 1846

Two Nations Britain in 1846

Author: Stephen Bates Format: Paperback Release Date: 15/01/2015

Britain in 1846 was a nation in the grip of dramatic change. As the Industrial Revolution reached its height, people were flooding from countryside to city; the railways were spreading; starvation and destitution existed alongside immense wealth and power, generating profound social tensions. And seismic change was afoot in the world of politics. Parliament's repeal of the protectionist Corn Laws eroded the powers of the landowners and ushered in an age of free trade that would form the basis of Britain's future wealth and industiral prosperity. Stephen Bates paints a kaleidoscopic portrait of a pivotal year in British history - and of a society on the cusp of modernity.

The Photographer's Boy A Novel

The Photographer's Boy A Novel

Author: Stephen Bates Format: Paperback Release Date: 17/07/2014

This novel spans from the Civil War to the present day and explores the ways we frame our own histories. A teenage boy and his grandfather travel across America to attend that last great reunion of Civil War veterans at Gettysburg in 1938, where secrets and lies are revealed about the old man's past. Perhaps he was not the hero his grandson thought, but he still has a valuable treasure to reveal, which will shed intriguing light on the war and his part in it. Interweaving three periods of crisis in American history-the Civil War, the Depression, and 9/11-The Photographer's Boy explores the power of photography and journalism to inform or mislead; raises questions about love; and offers an unflinching but sympathetic, often touching, look at the comforting fictions people wrap themselves in to protect themselves from the cold of reality (Publishers Weekly).

Photographer's Boy

Photographer's Boy

Author: Stephen Bates Format: eBook Release Date: 01/07/2014

This novel spans from the Civil War to the present day and explores the ways we frame our own histories. A teenage boy and his grandfather travel across America to attend that last great reunion of Civil War veterans at Gettysburg in 1938, where secrets and lies are revealed about the old man's past. Perhaps he was not the hero his grandson thought, but he still has a valuable treasure to reveal, which will shed intriguing light on the war and his part in it. Interweaving three periods of crisis in American historythe Civil War, the Depression, and 9/11The Photographer's Boy explores the power of photography and journalism to inform or mislead; raises questions about love; and offers ';an unflinching but sympathetic, often touching, look at the comforting fictions people wrap themselves in to protect themselves from the cold of reality' (Publishers Weekly).

The Poisoner The Life and Crimes of Victorian England's Most Notorious Doctor

The Poisoner The Life and Crimes of Victorian England's Most Notorious Doctor

Author: Stephen Bates Format: Paperback Release Date: 19/06/2014

The greatest villain who ever stood trial at the Old Bailey, as Charles Dickens described him William Palmer was convicted in 1856 of murdering his best friend, but was suspected of poisoning more than a dozen other people, including his wife and children. He was a new kind of murderer respectable, middle class, and consequently more terrifying, Britain s most infamous figure until Jack the Ripper. The Poisoner takes the reader into the very psyche of a killer

The Poisoner The Life and Crimes of Victorian England's Most Notorious Doctor

The Poisoner The Life and Crimes of Victorian England's Most Notorious Doctor

Author: Stephen Bates Format: Paperback Release Date: 19/06/2014

The greatest villain who ever stood trial at the Old Bailey, as Charles Dickens described him William Palmer was convicted in 1856 of murdering his best friend, but was suspected of poisoning more than a dozen other people, including his wife and children. He was a new kind of murderer respectable, middle class, and consequently more terrifying, Britain s most infamous figure until Jack the Ripper. The Poisoner takes the reader into the very psyche of a killer

Penny Loaves and Butter Cheap

Penny Loaves and Butter Cheap

Author: Stephen Bates Format: Hardback Release Date: 27/02/2014

Britain in 1846 was a nation in the grip of dramatic change. As the Industrial Revolution reached its height, people were flooding from countryside to city; the railways were spreading; starvation and destitution existed alongside immense wealth and power, generating profound social tensions. And seismic change was afoot in the world of politics. Parliament's repeal of the protectionist Corn Laws eroded the powers of the landowners and ushered in an age of free trade that would form the basis of Britain's future wealth and industiral prosperity. Stephen Bates paints a kaleidoscopic portrait of a pivotal year in British history - and of a society on the cusp of modernity.

Asquith

Asquith

Author: Stephen Bates Format: Paperback Release Date: 15/09/2006

Asquith's administration laid the foundation of Britain's welfare state, but he was plunged into a major power struggle with the House of Lords. The budget of 1909 was vetoed by the hereditary upper chamber, and in 1910 Asquith called and won two elections on this constitutional issue. The Lords eventually passed the 1911 Parliament Act, ending their veto of financial legislation. Asquith was Prime Minister on the outbreak of World War I, but his government fell in 1916 as a result of the 'Shells Scandal'.

A Church at War Anglicans and Homosexuality

A Church at War Anglicans and Homosexuality

Author: Stephen Bates Format: Hardback Release Date: 02/07/2004

The Anglican Communion is in turmoil. One of the great historic pillars of Christianity, embraced by 70 million people in 164 countries, faces the real and immediate possibility of dismberment, as the spectre of schism looms ever closer. Yet why is gay sexuality the tinderbox that could rip the Anglican Communion apart, and put an end to a century-old and hugely-prized international unity, when such contentious issues as the ordination of women, or unity discussions with other churches, failed to cause a split? In answering this question, Stephen Bates will show that unity has been coveted by some above integrity, and has been the cause of vicious infighting and internal politics. In the run-up to publication of A Church At War the author will be in the front line, as he files regular reports on the twists and turns of battle. His eagerly awaited book will be the only one to assess the current state and historical context of the row, the strengths and weaknesses of the protagonists' positions, and the tactics that they are employing to win the day. A Church At War promises compelling insights into a power struggle between factions seemingly united only by their mutual antipathy, and conducted, paradoxically, in the name of true communion.'

Author Info

Author's Website

http://www.stephenbateswriter.com/

Facebook Updates

If this is your author page then you can share your Facebook updates with your readers right here on LoveReading

Find out more