Tell us a story

LoveReading is thrilled to announce the launch of The Very Short Story Award 2019! If you think you have a story we'll love, click here to find out more and how to enter:

Find out more

Peter Grose - Author

About the Author

Peter Grose is a former publisher at Secker & Warburg, a former literary agent at Curtis Brown, and was until recently the chairman of ACP (UK). He is the author of two highly acclaimed books on WW2.

 

Author photo © Roslyn Grose

 

Below is a Q&A with this author.

 

Q. If you weren’t a writer, what would you like to be?

A. At risk of sounding like myself aged eight, I’d happily be a pilot. I love flying.

 

Q. Which books do you read for pleasure?

A. My all time favourite is Catch 22 by Joseph Heller. I’ve read it seven times. At the moment, I’m reading Back To Blood by Tom Wolfe and loving it. And every time I read a Ben Macintyre book, I think: I wish I’d written that. He’s terrific.

 

Q. What do you do to relax?

A. My favourite moment of the day is about 6:30 in the evening. I close down the computer, pour myself a whisky, mix a caipirinha for my wife, and switch off. I try to keep office hours … I like to be at my desk working by 10:00am, or earlier if I can manage it, and I don’t like to hang about in the office after 6:30. But if I didn’t keep office hours, I’d never get any work done. Sorry, that doesn’t tell you much about how I relax, does it? Well, I like Woody Allen movies, early morning tennis, trad jazz, good food and wine, and travel. I’m the cook in our household, and I find cooking, if not exactly relaxing, then at least a complete switch-off from work.

 

Q. Besides writing, what else do you do?

A. At the moment, my other preoccupation is learning French. My wife and I moved to France in 2008, and my French is still weak. A fair bit of the research for my last book The Greatest Escape involved reading a mountain of stuff in French. So I combined learning French with writing. Great chunks of my French homework went straight into the book!

 

Q. Do you miss anything, living in France?

A. In a word, CRICKET. I can’t get it on radio or TV here. I’m a cricket fanatic.

 

Q. What got you started as a writer?

A. I’ve been around the book trade for over 40 years, first as a literary agent and then as a publisher. Before that I was a journalist. I’m fascinated by stories, and for years I tried to commission some very good writers to do a book on the midget submarine raid on Sydney Harbour in May 1942. None of them would tackle it. So when I retired from publishing I thought: hell, I know it’s a great story, I’ll write it myself. That became A Very Rude Awakening, my first book. It sold pretty well, so the publishers pressed me to write more (not that I took a lot of persuading). That led to An Awkward Truth, about the bombing of Darwin, and now The Greatest Escape, about a French community that hid Jews during World War II.

 

Q. Do you ever suffer from writer’s block?

A. Fingers crossed, but so far so good. I got a bit bogged down a couple of years ago when I thought I was drowning in detail, all of it in French, for The Greatest Escape. But if you stick to the routine of keeping office hours, you can’t just stare out the window all day, you have to do something. And somehow the empty pages get filled with words.

 

Q. Have you ever been surprised by the reaction to your books?

A. You bet. For me, the biggest surprise and delight was discovering that I had a lot of women readers, maybe even a majority. The first two books were technically military history, and that’s not an area that attracts women. But I tried to stick to the human story rather than write about things that go bang and whoosh, and that seemed to suit women readers. Most of the letters I get are from women.

 

Q. What next?

A. That would be telling! I’ve got a couple of ideas, neither of them military history, but at the moment I just want to get The Greatest Escape launched and out there. Then I’ll sit on a beach somewhere, probably in Australia early next year, and take some decisions.

Featured books by Peter Grose

Other books by Peter Grose

A Good Place to Hide How One Community Saved Thousands of Lives from the Nazis In WWII

A Good Place to Hide How One Community Saved Thousands of Lives from the Nazis In WWII

Author: Peter Grose Format: Paperback Release Date: 07/04/2016

During the occupation of France in WWII the villages around Le Chambon-sur-Lignon pulled off an astonishing and largely unknown feat. Risking everything, they underwent a long-running battle of nerves and daring to hide 5,000 men, women and children, 3,500 of them Jews, from the Nazis and their Vichy stooges. Despite the danger, a whole community rallied together, from the pacifist pastor who defied orders to the glamorous female agent with a wooden leg, from the 18-year-old master forger to the schoolgirl who ran suitcases stuffed with money for the Resistance. Told using first-hand testimonies of many of the survivors and face-to-face interviews conducted by the author, A Good Place to Hide is the thrilling story of ordinary people who thwarted the Nazis and sheltered strangers in desperate need.

Power to People

Power to People

Author: Peter Grose Format: eBook Release Date: 04/07/2007

In the late 1990s, while Enron was flying high, a smaller power company flew under the radar. AES was founded in 1981 according to a differset of principles-fiscally conservative investmstrategies paired with the belief that business can be both fun and socially responsible.When Roger Sant arrived in Washington, D.C., in 1974, industry and governmwere focused on securing ever more oil, gas, coal, and nuclear energy, not on efficiency. Sant, who left a teaching position at Stanford's business school to become assistant administrator of the Federal Energy Administration, was committed to changing the focus. With his colleague Dennis Bakke and a handful of investors, Sant founded AES, an upstart energy service company that would ultimately help transform the industry. The company was built on Sant and Bakke's ideals: a healthy work environment, a healthy natural environment, and efficielectricity generation and delivery at an affordable price. AES seized the opportunities created by deregulation of the electricity industry, breaking free of an energy infrastructure dating back to Thomas Edison's day. While Enron and many others stumbled, AES proved itself able to survive and often to thrive. Rapid growth would become the company's greatest challenge, yet through exhilarating highs and disappointing lows, AES has maintained its founders' original vision of electricity generation that sustains workers, consumers, and the environment.Power to People is the story of electricity privatization, expanding global markets, and the transformation of an industry. It is also proof of the electrifying combination of innovation and good citizenship.

Power to People The Inside Story of AES and the Globalization of Electricity

Power to People The Inside Story of AES and the Globalization of Electricity

Author: Peter Grose Format: Hardback Release Date: 06/06/2007

In the late 1990s, while Enron was flying high, a smaller power company flew under the radar. AES was founded in 1981 according to a different set of principles - fiscally conservative investment strategies paired with the belief that business can be both fun and socially responsible.When Roger Sant arrived in Washington, D.C., in 1974, industry and government were focused on securing ever more oil, gas, coal, and nuclear energy, not on efficiency. Sant, who left a teaching position at Stanford's business school to become assistant administrator of the Federal Energy Administration, was committed to changing the focus. With his colleague Dennis Bakke and a handful of investors, Sant founded AES, an upstart energy service company that would ultimately help transform the industry.The company was built on Sant and Bakke's ideals: a healthy work environment, a healthy natural environment, and efficient electricity generation and delivery at an affordable price. AES seized the opportunities created by deregulation of the electricity industry, breaking free of an energy infrastructure dating back to Thomas Edison's day. While Enron and many others stumbled, AES proved itself able to survive and often to thrive. Rapid growth would become the company's greatest challenge, yet through exhilarating highs and disappointing lows, AES has maintained its founders' original vision of electricity generation that sustains workers, consumers, and the environment. Power to People is the story of electricity privatization, expanding global markets, and the transformation of an industry. It is also proof of the electrifying combination of innovation and good citizenship.

Council on Foreign Relations at 75

Council on Foreign Relations at 75

Author: Peter Grose Format: Paperback Release Date: 01/09/1996

Heir to the academic think-tank called The Inquiry that prepared Woodrow Wilson for the Paris Peace Conference in 1919, the Council on Foreign Relations has ever since filled a unique and often controversial place in the history of America's 20th century. Private and nonpartisan, endowed and financed over the decades by invited members, the New York-based Council has been called an incubator of ideas. From its book-lined meeting rooms and the pages of its publication Foreign Affairs has come much of the most provocative thought about foreign policy since the isolationist era of the 1920s, through World War II and the Cold War--and now beyond. This fresh and informal history of the Council's first 75 years reflects the diverse voices of Council members, who have been influential in both political parties, all presidential administrations following Wilson's, and on competing sides of major issues. Records of Council meetings reveal spirited discord and dissent on the problems of the day: to enter the war against fascism or put America First, about ideology and economics in the containment of communism, the influence of nuclear weapons upon diplomacy, recognition of communist China, the American war in Vietnam, and now the shape of the post-Cold War international order. The Council in its deliberations mirrors, as well as defines, the competing options for the society at large.

Twitter Updates

If this is your author page then you can share your Twitter updates with your readers right here on LoveReading

Find out more

Facebook Updates

If this is your author page then you can share your Facebook updates with your readers right here on LoveReading

Find out more