Book Series

Poet to Poet

John Berryman

John Berryman

Author: John Berryman Format: Paperback Release Date: 04/03/2004

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets in our literature. John Berryman (1914-72) was a poet from an immensely gifted generation of American poets that included Robert Lowell, Randall Jarrell and Elizabeth Bishop. His long sequence The Dream Songs has become an enduring landmark in American poetry and a tribute to Berryman's own endurance in the face of alcoholism, depression and mental instability. In 1972 he leaped to his death from a bridge above the Mississippi River.

John Dryden

John Dryden

Author: John Dryden Format: Paperback Release Date: 04/03/2004

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their selection of verses and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their introductions, the selectors offer a passionate and accessible introduction to some of the greatest poets in history. John Dryden (1631-1700) was educated at Westminster School and Cambridge University and became the leading literary figure of the Restoration period. Poet, playwright, polemicist and critic, Dryden became Poet Laureate in 1668 and Historiographer Royal in 1670. He concluded his vast output with Fables Ancient and Modern (1700).

Robert Browning

Robert Browning

Author: Robert Browning Format: Paperback Release Date: 04/03/2004

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets in our literature. Robert Browning (1812-89) was largely educated in his father's vast library and spent only one term at university. In 1846 he married Elizabeth Barrett Browning, eloping to Italy until her death in 1861, when he returned to England to complete his celebrated work The Ring and the Book (1868-9). He died in Venice in 1889.

W. B. Yeats

W. B. Yeats

Author: W.B. Yeats Format: Paperback Release Date: 04/03/2004

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets in our literature. W. B. Yeats (1865-1939) was born in Dublin, and was educated in Ireland and England. He was instrumental in the development of a national Irish theatre - and in particular, the founding of the Abbey Theatre. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1923.

Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson

Author: Emily Dickinson, Ted Hughes Format: Paperback Release Date: 04/03/2004

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets in our literature. Emily Dickinson (1830-86) was born in Amherst, Massachussetts, where she lived most of her life as a recluse, seldom leaving the house or receiving visitors. She published just a handful of poems in her lifetime, her first collection appearing posthumously in 1890.

Wilfred Owen

Wilfred Owen

Author: Wilfred Owen Format: Paperback Release Date: 04/03/2004

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets in our literature. Dying at twenty-five, a week before the end of the First World War, Wilfred Owen (1893-1918) has come to represent a generation of young men sacrificed - as it seems to the next generation, one in unprecedented rebellion against its fathers - by guilty old men: generals, politicians, profiteers. Owen has now taken his place in literary history as perhaps the first, certainly the quintessential, war poet.

Ted Hughes

Ted Hughes

Author: Ted Hughes Format: Paperback Release Date: 04/03/2004

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets in our literature. Ted Hughes (1930-98) was born in Yorkshire. His first book, The Hawk in the Rain, was published in 1957. His last collection, Birthday Letters, was published in 1998 and won the Whitbread Book of the Year, the Forward Prize and the T. S. Eliot Prize. He was appointed Poet Laureate in 1984 and appointed to the Order of Merit in 1998.

Alfred, Lord Tennyson

Alfred, Lord Tennyson

Author: Alfred, Lord Tennyson Format: Paperback Release Date: 04/03/2004

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets in our literature. Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809-92) was born in Somersby, Lincolnshire, the sixth of eleven children of a clergyman. After a childhood marked by trauma, he went up to Cambridge in 1828, where he met Arthur Hallam, whose premature death had a lasting influence on Tennyson's life and writing. His two volumes of Poems (1842) established him as the leading poet of his generation, and of the Victorian period. He was created Poet Laureate in 1850 and in 1883 accepted a peerage.

Ezra Pound

Ezra Pound

Author: Ezra Pound Format: Paperback Release Date: 07/04/2005

Ezra Pound was born in 1885 in Hailey, Idaho. He came to Europe in 1908 and settled in London, where he became a central figure in the literary and artistic world, befriended by Yeats and a supporter of Eliot and Joyce, among others. In 1920 he moved to Paris, and later to Rapallo in Italy. During the Second World War he made a series of propagandist broadcasts over Radio Rome, for which he was later tried in the United States and subsequently committed to a hospital for the insane. After thirteen years, he was released and returned to Italy; dying in Venice in 1972.

Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy

Author: Thomas Hardy Format: Paperback Release Date: 07/04/2005

A selection of the writer's greatest nature poetry, selected by Tom Paulin, published in a beautiful new edition by Faber. At once a voice arose among The bleak twigs overhead In a full-hearted evensong Of joy illimited; An aged thrush, frail, gaunt, and small, In blast-beruffled plume, Had chosen thus to fling his soul Upon the growing gloom . . . -The Darkling Thrush

Ben Jonson

Ben Jonson

Author: Ben Jonson Format: Paperback Release Date: 07/04/2005

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their selection of verses and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their introductions, the selectors offer a passionate and accessible introduction to some of the greatest poets in history. Ben Jonson (1572-1637) was born in London, and became a leading poet, playwright and essayist of the Elizabethan age. In 1598he killed an actor in a duel but escaped hanging by pleading benefit of the clergy, and by 1616 had re-established enough Court favour to be awarded a pension by James I - in effect making him the first Poet Laureate.

A. E. Housman

A. E. Housman

Author: A.E. Housman Format: Paperback Release Date: 07/04/2005

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their selection of verses and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their introductions, the selectors offer a passionate and accessible introduction to some of the greatest poets in history. A. E. Housman (1859-1936) was born in Fockbury, Worcestershire, and educated at St John's College, Oxford. His first collection, A Shropshire Lad, was published in 1896.

John Keats

John Keats

Author: John Keats Format: Paperback Release Date: 07/04/2005

John Keats (1795-1821) abandoned a career in medicine to write poetry, until his life was cut tragically short from tuberculosis at the age of twenty-five. By that time, he had published three volumes of verse to an unreceptive critical response. But as the nineteenth century wore on Keats's reputation would build, and today he is recognised as one of the greatest of the Romantic poets.

Louis MacNeice

Louis MacNeice

Author: Michael Longley Format: Paperback Release Date: 07/04/2005

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their selection of verses and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their introductions, the selectors offer a passionate and accessible introduction to some of the greatest poets in history. Louis MacNeice was born in Belfast in 1907 and educated at Marlborough and Merton College, Oxford. For most of his working life he was a writer and producer for BBC radio. His death in 1963 was sudden and unexpected.

William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth

Author: William Wordsworth Format: Paperback Release Date: 07/04/2005

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their selection of verses and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their introductions, the selectors offer a passionate and accessible introduction to some of the greatest poets in history. William Wordsworth (1770-1850) was born in Cockermouth, Cumberland. In 1798 he published the Lyrical Ballads with Coleridge, settling shortly after in Dove Cottage, Grasmere, with his sister Dorothy. He died at Rydal Mount in 1850, shortly before the posthumous publication of that landmark of English Romanticism, The Prelude.

John Betjeman

John Betjeman

Author: Sir John Betjeman Format: Paperback Release Date: 02/03/2006

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to the most important poets in our literature. Sir John Betjeman (1906-1984) was born in Highgate, the son of a manufacturer of Dutch descent. After university he joined the staff of the Architectural Review, thereafter working as a journalist and, during the Second World War, for various government departments. His first book of poems was Mount Zion (1931), followed by numerous collections, notably A Few Late Chrysanthemeumns (1954). His poetry enjoyed immense popularity, as did his personality, and his knighthood in 1969 and appointment as Poet Laureate in 1972 were almost universally welcomed.

Robert Lowell

Robert Lowell

Author: Robert Lowell Format: Paperback Release Date: 02/03/2006

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to the most important poets in our literature. Robert Lowell (1917-77) was born in Boston. Life Studies, published in 1959, was a watershed in American poetry, initiating an autobiographical project that became the dominating feature of his work and shaped poetry on both sides of the Atlantic. He was the renowned and controversial author of many books of poetry, including For the Union Dead (1964) and Day by Day (1977). Faber published his Collected Poems in 2003.

Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift

Author: Jonathan Swift Format: Paperback Release Date: 02/03/2006

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to the most important poets in our literature. Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) was born in Dublin, of English parents, and educated at Trinity College, Dublin. London-based for many years, and a noted satirist during the reign of Queen Anne, he returned to Dublin in 1713 as Dean of St. Patrick's Cathedral. Gulliver's Travels appeared in 1726. Derek Mahon was born in Belfast in 1941, studied at Trinity College, Dublin, and has held journalistic and academic appointments in London and New York. He has received numerous awards including a Lannan Award and the Scot Moncrieff Translation Prize. His Collected Poems was published in 1999.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Author: Samuel Taylor Coleridge Format: Paperback Release Date: 02/03/2006

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to the most important poets in our literature. Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) was born in Ottery St Mary, Devon, the youngest son of a clergyman. He was educated at Christ's Hospital School, London where he began his friendship with Charles Lamb, and Jesus College, Cambridge. He first met Dorothy and William Wordsworth in 1797 and a close association developed between them, issuing in their groundbreaking joint-publication, Lyrical Ballads, in 1799. Coleridge subsequently settled in the Lake District, and thereafter in London, where he lectured on Shakespeare and published his literary and philosophical theories in the Biographia Literaria (1817). He died in 1834 having overseen a final edition of his Poetical Works. As poet, philosopher and critic, Coleridge stands as one of the seminal figures of his time.

Keith Douglas

Keith Douglas

Author: Keith Douglas Format: Paperback Release Date: 02/03/2006

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to the most important poets in our literature. Keith Douglas (1920-1944) began writing when he was at school at Christ's Hospital School, London, continued at Oxford, and thereafter in the army and in the Middle East. By the time he was killed in Normandy, aged only twenty-four, in June 1944, he had achieved a body of work that singled him out as the most brilliant and promising English poet of the Second World War. The present pioneering selection of Keith Douglas's work, by Ted Hughes, was first published in 1964.

George Herbert

George Herbert

Author: George Herbert Format: Paperback Release Date: 02/03/2006

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets of our literature. George Herbert (1593-1633) was educated at Westminster School and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he was appointed Reader in Rhetoric in 1618 and Public Orator in 1620. He was a Greek and Latin scholar, was fluent in modern languages and an accomplished musician. In 1626 he resigned his seat in parliament and took holy orders, becoming Rector of Bemerton, a tiny rural parish on Salisbury Plain, in 1630. The Temple, Herbert's great structure of poems from which the present selection is drawn, first appeared in 1633, the year of his death.

William Barnes

William Barnes

Author: Sir Andrew Motion Format: Paperback Release Date: 05/04/2007

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to the most important poets in our literature. William Barnes was born in 1801 near Sturminster Newton in Dorset, of a farming family. He learned Greek, Latin and music, taught himself wood engraving, and in 1823 became a schoolmaster in Mere. He was deply interested in grammar and language, and waged a lifelong campaign to rid English of classical and foreign influences. Among his best-known books of poetry are Poems of Rural Life in the Dorset Dialect (1844) and Homely Rhymes (1859. His work has often been praised for its evocations of Dorset life, landscape and customs; he also wrote political poems of great power and was a master elegist. Barnes died in 1886.

Lord Byron

Lord Byron

Author: Paul Muldoon Format: Paperback Release Date: 05/04/2007

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to the most important poets in our literature. George Gordon was born in London in 1788, of Scottish, French and English extraction. He succeeded to a baronetcy in 1798, and as Lord Byron he was soon to become the most famous poet of his age - with the publication of Childe Harold, in 1812 - as well as one of its most notorious characters. His career spanned a momentous period in European history, in which Byron himself was deeply involved. He left England in 1816, and died in Missolonghi, Greece (where he had gone to join the forces struggling for Greek independence) in 1824.

John Clare

John Clare

Author: John Clare Format: Paperback Release Date: 05/04/2007

John Clare (1793-1864), the 'peasant poet', worked as an agricultural labourer in Northamptonshire until a deterioration in his mental health saw him committed to an insane asylum. He published four volumes of verse, including Poems, Descriptive of Rural Life and Scenery (1820), and The Shepherd's Calendar (1827). In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets of our literature.

Thom Gunn

Thom Gunn

Author: Thom Gunn Format: Paperback Release Date: 05/04/2007

Thom Gunn (1929-2004) was educated at Cambridge University, and had his first collection of poems, Fighting Terms, published while still an undergraduate. He moved to northern California in 1954 and taught in American universities until his death. His last collection was Boss Cupid (2000). In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets of our literature.

D. H. Lawrence

D. H. Lawrence

Author: Tom Paulin Format: Paperback Release Date: 05/04/2007

David Herbert Lawrence was born in Nottinghamshire in 1885. Predominantly remembered as a novelist, Lawrence began writing poetry when he was nineteen and published his first pieces in 1909 in the English Review. His first book of verse, Love Poems and Others, appeared in 1913. This was followed by Amores (1916), Look! We Have Come Through (1917), New Poems (1918), Bay (1919), Tortoises (1921), Birds, Beasts and Flowers (1923) and Pansies (1929). His Collected Poems appeared in 1928 and Last Poems was published posthumously in 1932. D.H. Lawrence died of tuberculosis in Vence in 1930. In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets of our literature.

Thomas Campion

Thomas Campion

Author: Charles Simic Format: Paperback Release Date: 05/04/2007

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to the most important poets in our literature. Thomas Campion (1567-1620) was born in London and educated at Cambridge. He studied law at Gray's Inn, and was both a poet and composer - a contemporary not only of Shakespeare, Drayton, Marlowe and Jonson, but also of Byrd, Morley, Gibbons and Dowland. Campion wrote over one hundred lute songs, published between 1601 and 1617 in four Books of Ayres, as well as a treatise on The Art of English Poesie, and a number of masques. His work was not rediscovered until the nineteenth century; since then, whoever dreams of a poem where language begins to resemble music thinks of Campion.

John Skelton

John Skelton

Author: John Skelton Format: Paperback Release Date: 01/05/2008

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets of our literature. John Skelton (1460-1529) lived through one of England's most turbulent and dangerous periods. A tutor to Prince Henry (later Henry VIII), Skelton enjoyed the monarch's favour at court, despite his outspokenness. Throughout the sixteenth century many of Skelton's poems were printed and reprinted, including The Bouge of Court , Philip Sparrow , Colin Clout and The Tunning of Elinour Rumming .

Allen Ginsberg

Allen Ginsberg

Author: Allen Ginsberg Format: Paperback Release Date: 01/05/2008

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets of our literature. Allen Ginsberg (1926-97) was born in Newark, New Jersey, to a poet-teacher father and Russian emigre mother. Along with his friend Jack Kerouac, he attended Columbia University, but was initially expelled for writings obscenities on his dormitory window before returning to complete his graduation in 1948. When Howl and Other Poems was impounded by San Francisco customs in 1956, the subsequent trial for obscenity catapulted Ginsberg and his publisher City Lights to national fame and helped to define the Beat Generation. His Collected Poems: 1947-1997 appeared in 2006.

Hart Crane

Hart Crane

Author: Maurice Riordan Format: Paperback Release Date: 01/05/2008

Harold Hart Crane was born in Ohio in 1899. In 1923 he became a copy-writer in New York. White Buildings, his first collection, appeared in 1926, and in 1930 his most famous work, The Bridge, was published. A reaction against the pessimism in T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land, The Bridge was a love song to the myth of America and its optimism a much needed boon to post-Wall Street Crash America. Hart Crane committed suicide in 1932.

Alexander Pope

Alexander Pope

Author: Alexander Pope Format: Paperback Release Date: 01/05/2008

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets of our literature. Alexander Pope (1688-1744) was an essayist, critic, satirist, poet and translator. He published An Essay on Criticism in 1711 and a republished version of The Rape of the Lock in 1714. His Collected Works were published in 1717 and he translated the Iliad and the Odyssey into English. The Dunciad (1728), one of his most famous works, was a vicious satire on Dullness featuring many of his contemporaries.

Thomas Wyatt

Thomas Wyatt

Author: Thomas Wyatt Format: Paperback Release Date: 01/05/2008

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets of our literature. Sir Thomas Wyatt was born in Kent in 1503 and educated at St John's College, Cambridge. He served Henry VIII as a diplomat in Europe but was imprisoned and almost executed for his close relationship with Anne Boleyn. On his release, Wyatt became Sheriff of Kent and later Ambassador to Spain, and died 1542 from a fever caught on a diplomatic mission.

Andrew Marvell

Andrew Marvell

Author: Sean O'Brien Format: Paperback Release Date: 05/08/2010

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets of our literature. Andrew Marvell was born in Yorkshire in 1624 and was educated in Hull and Cambridge. He became the unofficial laureate to Cromwell and in 1657 he took over from Milton as the Latin Secretary to the Council of State. Famed as a satirist during his lifetime Marvell was a virtually unknown lyric poet until rediscovered in the nineteenth century. However, it was only after the First World War that his poetry gained popularity thanks to the efforts of T. S. Eliot and Sir Herbert Grierson. Marvell died in 1678.

William Blake

William Blake

Author: James Fenton Format: Paperback Release Date: 05/08/2010

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets of our literature. A painter, poet and engraver William Blake (1757-1827) was born in London. Poetical Sketches, his first volume of poetry, was published in 1783 and was followed by several of his best known works: Songs of Innocence (1789), The Book of Thel (1789), The Marriage of Heaven and Hell (1790-93), Songs of Experience (1794) and Jerusalem (1804-20).

Robert Herrick

Robert Herrick

Author: Stephen Romer Format: Paperback Release Date: 05/08/2010

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets of our literature. Robert Herrick was born in London, in 1591, the seventh child of a prosperous goldsmith. He graduated from St. John's College, Cambridge in 1617, and became a Cavalier poet in the mould of Ben Jonson, mixing in literary circles in London. He was ordained in 1623 and subsequently appointed by Charles I to the living of Dean Prior in Devon, where he lived in the reluctant seclusion of country life and wrote some of his best work. In 1647, under the Commonwealth, Herrick was expelled from the priory and returned to London, where he published his major work, Hesperides, the following year. With the restoration of Charles II in 1660 he was returned to Devon and died a bachelor in 1674.

Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley

Author: Fiona Sampson Format: Paperback Release Date: 17/05/2012

Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822) was born in Sussex and died in Italy when his sailing boat overturned while returning from a visit to Byron. A radical thinker and social campaigner, Shelley wrote some of the finest lyric verse in the English language which confirms his standing as a major figure in Romantic literature. In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets of our literature.

Gerard Manley Hopkins

Gerard Manley Hopkins

Author: Gerard Manley Hopkins Format: Paperback Release Date: 17/05/2012

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets of our literature. Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889) was born in Stratford. He attended Balliol College, Oxford where he befriended the future Poet Laureate Robert Bridges. While at Balliol he converted to Catholicism and after graduating he entered the Society of Jesus and was ordained in 1877. Having burned his early poems on entering the Church, Hopkins eventually took up writing again but apart from a few poems that appeared in periodicals he was not published during his own lifetime. Since the publication of his poems in 1918 he has become one of the best known poets of the Victorian age and his are among the greatest poems written on the subject of faith and doubt.

Dylan Thomas

Dylan Thomas

Author: Dylan Thomas Format: Paperback Release Date: 25/12/2018

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets in our literature. Dylan Thomas (1914-53) was born in Swansea and educated at Swansea Grammar School. He worked as a journalist and screenwriter in Swansea and London, contributing frequently to BBC Radio. His publications included The Map of Love (1939), Deaths and Entrances (1946) and Collected Poems (1952). Under Milk Wood, 'a play for voices', appeared posthumously.

Sir Walter Ralegh

Sir Walter Ralegh

Author: Ruth Padel Format: Paperback Release Date: 10/09/2019

In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to some of the greatest poets of our literature. Sir Walter Ralegh, poet, scholar, soldier and explorer, travel-writer, historian and favourite courtier of Queen Elizabeth I, was born in Devon around 1552, knighted in 1584, imprisoned twice in the Tower of London, where he wrote his History of the World, and executed in 1618. Many famous poems attributed to him, like The Passionate Man's Pilgrimage , may not actually be his. But, like the many poems written to him by the Queen and others, they testify to what Ralegh stood for in the Elizabethan age, as a poet and a man.

Robert Burns

Robert Burns

Author: Robert Burns Format: Paperback Release Date: 06/02/2020

Robert Burns (1759-96) was born into a farming family in Ayrshire, Scotland. The publication in 1786 of his first book, Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish dialect, made him famous overnight, and saw him feted by Edinburgh society. But Burns made no money from his writing and quickly fell on hard times, returning to farming in Dumfries and, when that failed, to work as an excise officer. He devoted his final years to poetry and the writing of Scottish songs.

Sylvia Plath

Sylvia Plath

Author: Sylvia Plath Format: Paperback Release Date: 19/05/2022

The response of one writer to the work of another can be doubly illuminating. In this series, a poet selects and introduces another poet whom they have particularly admired. Ted Hughes's classic selection of Sylvia Plath's poetry provides the perfect introduction to a major body of work in twentieth-century poetry. Hughes draws upon the collections Ariel, The Colossus, Crossing the Water and Winter Trees, and from Sylvia Plath's Pulitzer Prize-winning Collected Poems.