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Books in the series: Gender in History

Women Art Workers and the Arts and Crafts Movement

Women Art Workers and the Arts and Crafts Movement

Author: Zoe Thomas Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/05/2020

This book constitutes the first comprehensive history of the network of women who worked at the heart of the English Arts and Crafts movement from the 1870s to the 1930s. Challenging the long-standing assumption that the Arts and Crafts simply revolved around celebrated male designers like William Morris, it instead offers a new social and cultural account of the movement, which simultaneously reveals the breadth of the imprint of women art workers upon the making of modern society. Thomas provides unprecedented insight into how women navigated authoritative roles as 'art workers' by asserting expertise across a range of interconnected cultures: from the artistic to the professional, intellectual, entrepreneurial and domestic. Through examination of newly discovered institutional archives and private papers, Thomas elucidates the critical importance of the spaces around which women conceptualised alternative creative and professional lifestyles. -- .

Imagining Caribbean Womanhood Race, Nation and Beauty Competitions, 1929-70

Imagining Caribbean Womanhood Race, Nation and Beauty Competitions, 1929-70

Author: Rochelle Rowe Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 04/05/2020

Over fifty years after Jamaican and Trinidadian independence, Imagining Caribbean womanhood examines the links between beauty and politics in the Anglophone Caribbean, providing a first cultural history of Caribbean beauty competitions, spanning from Kingston to London. It traces the origins and transformation of female beauty contests in the British Caribbean from 1929 to 1970, through the development of cultural nationalism, race-conscious politics and decolonisation. The beauty contest, a seemingly marginal phenomenon, is used to illuminate the persistence of racial supremacy, the advance of consumer culture and the negotiation of race and nation through the idealised performance of cultured, modern beauty. Modern Caribbean femininity was intended to be politically functional but also commercially viable and subtly eroticised. -- .

Medieval Women and Urban Justice Commerce, Crime and Community in England, 1300-1500

Medieval Women and Urban Justice Commerce, Crime and Community in England, 1300-1500

Author: Teresa (Research Assistant) Phipps Format: Hardback Release Date: 21/04/2020

This book provides a detailed analysis of women's involvement in litigation and other legal actions within their local communities in late-medieval England. It draws upon the rich records of three English towns - Nottingham, Chester and Winchester - and their courts to bring to life the experiences of hundreds of women within the systems of local justice. Through comparison of the records of three towns, and of women's roles in different types of legal action, the book reveals the complex ways in which individual women's legal status could vary according to their marital status, different types of plea and the town that they lived in. At this lowest level of medieval law, women's status was malleable, making each woman's experience of justice unique. -- .

Sexual Progressives Reimagining Intimacy in Scotland, 1880-1914

Sexual Progressives Reimagining Intimacy in Scotland, 1880-1914

Author: Tanya Cheadle Format: Hardback Release Date: 22/03/2020

Sexual Progressives is a major new study of the feminists and socialists who campaigned against the moral conservatism of the Victorian period. Drawing on a range of sources, from letters and diaries to radical newspapers and utopian novels, it provides the first group portrait of Scotland's hitherto neglected sexual rebels. They include Bella and Charles Pearce, prominent Glasgow socialists and disciples of an American-based mystic who taught that religion needed 're-sexed'; Jane Hume Clapperton, a feminist freethinker with advanced views on birth-control and women's right to sexual pleasure; and Patrick Geddes, founder of an avant-garde Edinburgh subculture and co-author of an influential scientific book on sex. A consideration of their lives and work forces a reappraisal of our understanding of British sexual progressivism during this period and will therefore be of interest to all historians of modern gender and sexuality. -- .

Gender, Rhetoric and Regulation Women's Work in the Civil Service and the London County Council, 1900-55

Gender, Rhetoric and Regulation Women's Work in the Civil Service and the London County Council, 1900-55

Author: Helen Glew Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/03/2020

The Civil Service and the London County Council employed tens of thousands of women in Britain in the early twentieth century. As public employers these institutions influenced both each other and private organisations, thereby serving as a barometer or benchmark for the conditions of women's white-collar employment. Drawing on a wide range of archival sources - including policy documents, trade union records, women's movement campaign literature and employees' personal testimony - this is the first book-length study of women's public service employment in this period. It examines three aspects of their working lives - inequality of pay, the marriage bar and inequality of opportunity - and demonstrates how far wider cultural assumptions about womanhood shaped policies towards women's employment and experiences. Scholars and students with interests in gender, British social and cultural history and labour history will find this an invaluable text. -- .

Catholic Nuns and Sisters in a Secular Age Britain, 1945-90

Catholic Nuns and Sisters in a Secular Age Britain, 1945-90

Author: Carmen M. Mangion Format: Hardback Release Date: 24/12/2019

This is the first in-depth study of post-war female religious life. It draws on archival materials and a remarkable set of eighty interviews to place Catholic sisters and nuns at the heart of the turbulent 1960s, integrating their story of social change into a larger British and international one. Shedding new light on how religious bodies engaged in modernisation, it addresses themes such as the Modern Girl and youth culture, '1968', generational discourse, post-war modernity, the voluntary sector and the women's movement. Women religious were at the forefront of the Roman Catholic Church's movement of adaptation and renewal towards the world. This volume tells their stories in their own words. -- .

Women Against Cruelty Protection of Animals in Nineteenth-Century Britain

Women Against Cruelty Protection of Animals in Nineteenth-Century Britain

Author: Diana Donald Format: Hardback Release Date: 22/10/2019

This is the first book to explore women's leading role in animal protection in nineteenth-century Britain, drawing on rich archival sources. Women founded bodies such as the Battersea Dogs' Home, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds and various groups that opposed vivisection. They energetically promoted better treatment of animals, both through practical action and through their writings, such as Anna Sewell's Black Beauty. Yet their efforts were frequently belittled by opponents, or decried as typifying female 'sentimentality' and hysteria. Only the development of feminism in the later Victorian period enabled women to show that spontaneous fellow-feeling with animals was a civilising force. Women's own experience of oppressive patriarchy bonded them with animals, who equally suffered from the dominance of masculine values in society, and from an assumption that all-powerful humans were entitled to exploit animals at will. -- .

Women Before the Court Law and Patriarchy in the Anglo-American World, 1600-1800

Women Before the Court Law and Patriarchy in the Anglo-American World, 1600-1800

Author: Lindsay R. Moore Format: Hardback Release Date: 04/05/2019

This book offers an innovative, comparative approach to the study of women's legal rights during a formative period of Anglo-American history. It traces how colonists transplanted English legal institutions to America, examines the remarkable depth of women's legal knowledge and shows how the law increasingly undermined patriarchal relationships between parents and children, masters and servants, husbands and wives. The book will be of interest to scholars of Britain and colonial America, and to laypeople interested in how women in the past navigated and negotiated the structures of authority that governed them. It is packed with fascinating stories that women related to the courts in cases ranging from murder and abuse to debt and estate litigation. Ultimately, it makes a remarkable contribution to our understandings of law, power and gender in the early modern world. -- .

Women, Workplace Protest and Political Identity in England, 1968-85

Women, Workplace Protest and Political Identity in England, 1968-85

Author: Jonathan Moss Format: Hardback Release Date: 04/04/2019

This book draws upon original research into women's workplace protest to deliver a new account of working-class women's political identity and participation in post-war England. Focusing on the voices and experiences of women who fought for equal pay, skill recognition and the right to work between 1968 and 1985, it explores why working-class women engaged in such action when they did, and it analyses the impact of workplace protest on women's political identity. A combination of oral history and written sources are used to illuminate how everyday experiences of gender and class antagonism shaped working-class women's political identity and participation. The book contributes a fresh understanding of the relationship between feminism, workplace activism and trade unionism during the years 1968-1985. -- .

Men on Trial Performing Emotion, Embodiment and Identity in Ireland, 1800-45

Men on Trial Performing Emotion, Embodiment and Identity in Ireland, 1800-45

Author: Katie Barclay Format: Hardback Release Date: 29/10/2018

Men on trial explores how the Irish perform 'the self' within the early nineteenth-century courtroom and its implications for law, society and nation. Drawing on new methodologies from the history of emotion, as well as theories of performativity and performative space, it emphasises that manliness was not simply a cultural ideal, but something practised, felt and embodied. Men on trial explores how gender could be a creative dynamic in productions of power. Targeted at scholars in Irish history, law and gender studies, this book argues that justice was not simply determined through weighing evidence, but through weighing men, their bodies, behaviours, and emotions. Moreover, in a context where the processes of justice were publicised in the press for the nation and the world, manliness and its role in the creation of justice became implicated in the making of national identity. -- .

Women and Museums 1850-1914 Modernity and the Gendering of Knowledge

Women and Museums 1850-1914 Modernity and the Gendering of Knowledge

Author: Kate Hill Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 13/09/2018

This book recovers the significant contribution made by women to museums, not just in obvious roles such as workers, but also as donors, visitors, volunteers and patrons. It suggests that women persistently acted to domesticate the museum, by importing domestic objects and domestic regimes of value, as well as by making museums more welcoming to children, and even by stressing the importance of housekeeping at the museum. At the same time, women sought 'masculine' careers in science and curatorship, but found such aspirations hard to achieve; their contribution tended to be kept within clear, feminised areas. The book will be of interest to those working on gender, culture, or museums in the period. It sheds new light on women's material culture and material strategies, education and professional careers, and leisure practices. It will form an important historical context for those working in contemporary museum studies. -- .

Women of Letters Gender, Writing and the Life of the Mind in Early Modern England

Women of Letters Gender, Writing and the Life of the Mind in Early Modern England

Author: Leonie Hannan Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/06/2018

Women of letters writes a new history of English women's intellectual worlds using their private letters as evidence of hidden networks of creative exchange. The book argues that many women of this period engaged with a life of the mind and demonstrates the dynamic role letter-writing played in the development of ideas. Until now, it has been assumed that women's intellectual opportunities were curtailed by their confinement in the home. This book illuminates the household as a vibrant site of intellectual thought and expression. Amidst the catalogue of day-to-day news in women's letters are sections dedicated to the discussion of books, plays and ideas. Through these personal epistles, Women of letters offers a fresh interpretation of intellectual life in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, one that champions the ephemeral and the fleeting in order to rediscover women's lives and minds. -- .

The State as Master Gender, State Formation and Commercialisation in Urban Sweden, 1650-1780

The State as Master Gender, State Formation and Commercialisation in Urban Sweden, 1650-1780

Author: Maria Agren Format: Hardback Release Date: 21/08/2017

We tend to think of state service as the typical male form of work. However, this notion does not do justice to the early history of states and their servants, and it obscures the role of women and gender entirely. Teasing out these entanglements, The state as master shows how early modern state formation was subsidized by ordinary people's work and how, at the same time, the changing relationship between state authorities and families shaped the understanding of work and gender. This book is both a fascinating story of the hardships of customs official families in small Swedish towns and an innovative analysis of state formation and its short- and long-term effects. -- .

Gender and Housing in Soviet Russia Private Life in a Public Space

Gender and Housing in Soviet Russia Private Life in a Public Space

Author: Lynne Attwood Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 29/07/2017

This book explores the housing problem throughout the seventy years of Soviet history. It looks at changing political ideology on appropriate forms of housing under socialism, successive government policies on housing, and the meaning and experience of 'home' for Soviet citizens. Ultimately, it examines the use of housing to alter gender relations, and the ways in which domestic space was differentially experienced by men and women. The material, taken from Soviet magazines and journals, demonstrates how official ideas on housing and daily life changed during the course of the Soviet era, and how they were propagandised to the population. Through a series of in-depth interviews, the book also draws on the memories of people with direct experience of Soviet housing and domestic life. More than a history of housing, the book is a social history of daily life which will appeal both to scholars and those with a general interest in the Soviet era. -- .

The Women'S Liberation Movement in Scotland

The Women'S Liberation Movement in Scotland

Author: Sarah Browne Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 21/02/2017

This first book-length account of the women's liberation movement in Scotland, uses documentary evidence and oral testimony to chart the origins and development of this important social movement. It reveals the inventiveness and fearlessness of feminist activism, while also pointing towards the importance of considering the movement from grassroots perspectives, presenting a more optimistic account of this enduring legacy. It not only uncovers the reach of the WLM but also considers what women's liberation can tell us about the ways in which the development of the movement has been portrayed. Previous accounts have tended to equate the fragmentation of the movement with weakness and decline. This book challenges this conclusion, arguing that fragmentation led to a diffusion of feminist ideas into wider society. In the Scottish context, it led to a lively and flourishing feminist culture where activists highlighted important issues. -- .

Women, Dowries and Agency Marriage in Fifteenth-Century Valencia

Women, Dowries and Agency Marriage in Fifteenth-Century Valencia

Author: Dana Wessell Lightfoot Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/10/2016

This book examines labouring-status women in late medieval Valencia as they negotiated the fundamentally defining experience of their lives: marriage. Through the use of notarial records and civil court cases, it argues that the socio-economic and immigrant status of these women greatly enhanced their ability to exercise agency not only in choosing a spouse and gathering dotal assets, but also in controlling this property after they wed. Although the prevailing legal code in Valencia appeared to give wives little authority over these assets, court records demonstrate that they were still able to negotiate a measure of control. In these actions, labouring-status wives exercised agency by protecting their marital goods from harm, using legal statutes to their own advantage. In looking at the experiences of labouring-status women, this monograph shifts the debate regarding women's access to and control of property in the medieval period. Exploring a group previously unexamined by scholars, it argues that our understanding of women's marital strategies changes, challenging the central role of blood and marital kin in these negotiations. -- .

Jewish Women in Europe in the Middle Ages A Quiet Revolution

Jewish Women in Europe in the Middle Ages A Quiet Revolution

Author: Simha Goldin Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 07/09/2016

Goldin's study explores the relationships between men and women within Jewish society living in Germany, northern France and England among the Christian population over a period of some 350 years. Looking at original Hebrew sources to conduct a social analysis, he takes us from the middle of the tenth century until the middle of the second half of the fourteenth century, when the Christian population had expelled the Jews from almost all of the places they were living. Particularly fascinating are the attitudes towards women, as well as their changes in social status. By examining the factors involved in these issues, including views of the leadership, economic influences, internal power politics and gender struggles, Goldin's book provides a greater understanding of the functioning of these communities. This volume will be of great interest to historians of medieval Europe, gender and religion. -- .

Women and Museums 1850-1914 Modernity and the Gendering of Knowledge

Women and Museums 1850-1914 Modernity and the Gendering of Knowledge

Author: Kate Hill Format: Hardback Release Date: 21/06/2016

This book recovers the significant contribution made by women to museums, not just in obvious roles such as workers, but also as donors, visitors, volunteers and patrons. It suggests that women persistently acted to domesticate the museum, by importing domestic objects and domestic regimes of value, as well as by making museums more welcoming to children, and even by stressing the importance of housekeeping at the museum. At the same time, women sought 'masculine' careers in science and curatorship, but found such aspirations hard to achieve; their contribution tended to be kept within clear, feminised areas. The book will be of interest to those working on gender, culture, or museums in the period. It sheds new light on women's material culture and material strategies, education and professional careers, and leisure practices. It will form an important historical context for those working in contemporary museum studies. -- .

Women of Letters Gender, Writing and the Life of the Mind in Early Modern England

Women of Letters Gender, Writing and the Life of the Mind in Early Modern England

Author: Dr. Leonie Hannan Format: Hardback Release Date: 09/05/2016

Women of letters writes a new history of English women's intellectual worlds using their private letters as evidence of hidden networks of creative exchange. The book argues that many women of this period engaged with a life of the mind and demonstrates the dynamic role letter-writing played in the development of ideas. Until now, it has been assumed that women's intellectual opportunities were curtailed by their confinement in the home. This book illuminates the household as a vibrant site of intellectual thought and expression. Amidst the catalogue of day-to-day news in women's letters are sections dedicated to the discussion of books, plays and ideas. Through these personal epistles, Women of letters offers a fresh interpretation of intellectual life in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, one that champions the ephemeral and the fleeting in order to rediscover women's lives and minds. -- .

Women, Credit, and Debt in Early Modern Scotland

Women, Credit, and Debt in Early Modern Scotland

Author: Cathryn Spence Format: Hardback Release Date: 02/02/2016

This text provides the first full-length consideration of women's economic roles in early modern Scottish towns. Drawing on tens of thousands of cases entered into burgh court litigation between 1560 and 1640 in Edinburgh, Dundee, Haddington and Linlithgow, Women, credit and debt explores how Scottish women navigated their courts and their communities. The employments and by-employments that brought these women to court and the roles they had in the economy are also considered. In particular, this book explores the role of women as merchants, merchandisers, producers and sellers of ale, landladies, moneylenders and servants. Comparing the Scottish experience to that of England and Europe, Spence shows that over the course of the latter half of the sixteenth century and into the seventeenth century women were conspicuously active in burgh court litigation and, by extension, were engaged participants in the early modern Scottish economy. -- .

Gender, Rhetoric and Regulation Women's Work in the Civil Service and the London County Council, 1900-55

Gender, Rhetoric and Regulation Women's Work in the Civil Service and the London County Council, 1900-55

Author: Helen Glew Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/01/2016

The Civil Service and the London County Council employed tens of thousands of women in Britain in the early twentieth century. As public employers these institutions influenced both each other and private organisations, thereby serving as a barometer or benchmark for the conditions of women's white-collar employment. Drawing on a wide range of archival sources - including policy documents, trade union records, women's movement campaign literature and employees' personal testimony - this is the first book-length study of women's public service employment in this period. It examines three aspects of their working lives - inequality of pay, the marriage bar and inequality of opportunity - and demonstrates how far wider cultural assumptions about womanhood shaped policies towards women's employment and experiences. Scholars and students with interests in gender, British social and cultural history and labour history will find this an invaluable text. -- .

The 'Perpetual Fair' Gender, Disorder, and Urban Amusement in Eighteenth-Century London

The 'Perpetual Fair' Gender, Disorder, and Urban Amusement in Eighteenth-Century London

Author: Anne Wohlcke Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/12/2015

Each summer, a 'perpetual fair' plagued eighteenth-century London, a city in transition overrun by a burgeoning population. City officials attempted to control disorderly urban amusement according to their own gendered understandings of order and morality. Frequently derided as locations of dangerous femininity disrupting masculine commerce, fairs withstood regulation attempts. Fairs were important in the lives of ordinary Londoners as sites of women's work, sociability, and local and national identity formation. Rarely studied as vital to London's modernisation, urban fairs are a microcosm of London's transforming society, demonstrating how metropolitan changes were popularly contested. Now available in paperback, this study contributes to our understanding of popular culture and modernisation in Britain during the formative years of its global empire. Fascinating examples drawn from literary and visual culture make this an engaging study for scholars and students of late Stuart and early Georgian Britain, urban and gender history, World's Fairs and cultural studies. -- .

Queen and Country Same-Sex Desire in the British Armed Forces, 1939-45

Queen and Country Same-Sex Desire in the British Armed Forces, 1939-45

Author: Emma Vickers Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/10/2015

Queen and country examines the complex intersection between same-sex desire and the British Armed Forces during the Second World War. It illuminates how men and women lived, loved and survived in an institution which, at least publicly, was unequivocally hostile towards same-sex activity within its ranks. Queen and country also tells a story of selective remembrance and the politics of memory, exploring specifically why same-sex desire continues to be absent from the historical record of the war. In examining this absence, and the more intimate minutiae of cohesion, homosociability and desire, this study pushes far beyond traditional military history in order to cast new light on one of the most widely discussed conflicts of the twentieth century. -- .

Infidel Feminism Secularism, Religion and Women's Emancipation, England 1830-1914

Infidel Feminism Secularism, Religion and Women's Emancipation, England 1830-1914

Author: Laura Schwarz Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/03/2015

Infidel feminism is the first in-depth study of a distinctive brand of women's rights that emerged out of the Victorian Secularist movement. It looks at the lives and work of a number of female activists, whose renunciation of religion shaped their struggle for emancipation. Anti-religious or secular ideas were fundamental to the development of feminist thought, but have, until now, been almost entirely passed over in the historiography of the Victorian and Edwardian women's movement. In uncovering an important tradition of Freethinking feminism, this book reveals an ongoing radical and free love current connecting Owenite feminism with the more 'respectable' post-1850 women's movement and the 'New Women' of the early twentieth century. This book, newly available in paperback, will be invaluable to both scholars and students of social and cultural history and feminist thought, and to interdisciplinary studies of religion and secularisation, as well as those interested in the history of women's movements more broadly. -- .

Housewives and Citizens Domesticity and the Women's Movement in England, 1928-64

Housewives and Citizens Domesticity and the Women's Movement in England, 1928-64

Author: Caitriona Beaumont Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/03/2015

After an extremely successful debut in hardback, Housewives and citizens is now available in paperback for the first time. This book explores the contribution that five conservative, voluntary and popular women's organisations made to women's lives and to the campaign for women's rights throughout the period 1928-64. The book challenges existing histories of the women's movement that suggest the movement went into decline during the inter-war period, only to be revived by the emergence of the Women's Liberation Movement in the late 1960s. It is argued that the term 'women's movement' must be revised to allow a broader understanding of female agency encompassing feminist, political, religious and conservative women's groups who campaigned to improve the status of women throughout the twentieth century. The book provides a radical re-assessment of this period of women's history and in doing so makes a significant contribution to ongoing debates about the shape and impact of the women's movement in twentieth-century Britain. -- .

The Women'S Liberation Movement in Scotland

The Women'S Liberation Movement in Scotland

Author: Sarah Browne Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/08/2014

This is the first book-length account of the women's liberation movement in Scotland, which, using documentary evidence and oral testimony, charts the origins and development of this important social movement of the post-1945 period. In doing so, it reveals the inventiveness and fearlessness of feminist activism, while also pointing towards the importance of considering the movement from the local and grassroots perspectives, presenting a more optimistic account of the enduring legacy of women's liberation. Not only does this book uncover the reach of the WLM but it also considers what case studies of women's liberation can tell us about the ways in which the development of the movement has been portrayed. Previous accounts have tended to equate the fragmentation of the movement with weakness and decline. This book challenges this conclusion, arguing that fragmentation led to a diffusion of feminist ideas into wider society. In the Scottish context, it led to a lively and flourishing feminist culture where activists highlighted important issues such as abortion and violence against women. -- .

The 'Perpetual Fair' Gender, Disorder, and Urban Amusement in Eighteenth-Century London

The 'Perpetual Fair' Gender, Disorder, and Urban Amusement in Eighteenth-Century London

Author: Anne Wohlcke Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/05/2014

Each summer, a 'perpetual fair' plagued eighteenth-century London, a city in transition overrun by a burgeoning population. City officials attempted to control disorderly urban amusement according to their own gendered understandings of order and morality. Frequently derided as locations of dangerous femininity disrupting masculine commerce, fairs withstood regulation attempts. Fairs were important in the lives of ordinary Londoners as sites of women's work, sociability, and local and national identity formation. Rarely studied as vital to London's modernisation, urban fairs are a microcosm of London's transforming society, demonstrating how metropolitan changes were popularly contested. This study contributes to our understanding of popular culture and modernisation in Britain during the formative years of its global empire. Fascinating examples drawn from literary and visual culture make this an engaging study for scholars and students of late Stuart and early Georgian Britain, urban and gender history, World's Fairs and cultural studies. -- .

Victorians and the Virgin Mary Religion and Gender in England, 1830-85

Victorians and the Virgin Mary Religion and Gender in England, 1830-85

Author: Carol Engelhardt Herringer Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/05/2014

This interdisciplinary study of competing representations of the Virgin Mary examines how anxieties about religious and gender identities intersected to create public controversies that, whilst ostensibly about theology and liturgy, were also attempts to define the role and nature of women. Drawing on a variety of sources, this book seeks to revise our understanding of the Victorian religious landscape, both retrieving Catholics from the cultural margins to which they are usually relegated, and calling for a reassessment of the Protestant attitude to the feminine ideal. This book will be useful to advanced students and scholars in a variety of disciplines including history, religious studies, Victorian studies, women's history and gender studies. -- .

Modern Motherhood Women and Family in England, 1945-2000

Modern Motherhood Women and Family in England, 1945-2000

Author: Angela Davis Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/05/2014

Winner of the Women's History Network Book Prize, 2013 This book examines women's experiences of motherhood in England in the years between 1945 and 2000. Based on a new body of 160 oral history interviews, the book offers the first comprehensive historical study of the experience of motherhood in the second half of the twentieth century. Motherhood is an area where a number of discourses and practices meet. The book forms a thematic study looking at aspects of mothers' lives such as education, health care, psychology, labour market trends and state intervention. Looking through the prism of motherhood provides a way of understanding the complex social changes that have taken place in the post-war world. This book will be essential reading for students and researchers in the field of twentieth-century British social history. However it will also be of interest to scholars in related fields and a general readership with an interest in British social history. 'A fascinating survey of women's experience of motherhood', 'eminently readable', 'a solid and thoughtful study', 'an outstanding piece of oral history', and 'ambitiously wide ranging'. The judging panel for the Women's History Network Book Prize, 2013. -- .

Being Boys Youth, Leisure and Identity in the Inter-War Years

Being Boys Youth, Leisure and Identity in the Inter-War Years

Author: Melanie Tebbutt Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/04/2014

This original and fresh approach to the emotions of adolescence focuses on the leisure lives of working-class boys and young men in the inter-war years. Being boys challenges many stereotypes about their behaviour. It offers new perspectives on familiar and important themes in inter-war social and cultural history, ranging from the cinema and mass consumption to boys' clubs, personal advice pages, street cultures, dancing, sexuality, mobility and the body. It draws on many autobiographies and personal accounts and is particularly distinctive in offering an unusual insight into working-class adolescence through the teenage diaries of the author's father, which are interwoven with the book's broader analysis of contemporary leisure developments. Being boys will be of interest to scholars and students across the humanities and social sciences and is also relevant to those teaching and studying in the fields of child development, education, and youth and community studies. -- .

Love, Intimacy and Power Marriage and Patriarchy in Scotland, 1650-1850

Love, Intimacy and Power Marriage and Patriarchy in Scotland, 1650-1850

Author: Katie Barclay Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/03/2014

Winner of the 2012 Senior Hume Brown Prize in Scottish History and the 2012 Women's History Network (UK) Book Prize Through an analysis of the correspondence of over one hundred couples from the Scottish elites across the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries, this book explores how ideas around the nature of emotional intimacy, love and friendship within marriage adapted to a modernising economy and society. Patriarchy continued to be the central model for marriage across the period and as a result, women found spaces to hold power within the family, but could not translate it to power beyond the household. Comparing the Scottish experience to that across Europe and North America, Barclay shows that throughout the eighteenth century, far from being a side-note in European history, Scottish ideas about gender and marriage became culturally dominant. Now available in paperback, this book will be vital to those studying and teaching Scottish social history, and those interested in the history of marriage and gender. It will also appeal to feminists interested in the history of patriarchy. 'An important and original study' WHN Book Prize 2012 Judges -- .

Elizabeth Wolstenholme Elmy and the Victorian Feminist Movement The Biography of an Insurgent Woman

Elizabeth Wolstenholme Elmy and the Victorian Feminist Movement The Biography of an Insurgent Woman

Author: Maureen Wright Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/02/2014

This book provides the first full-length biography of Elizabeth Wolstenholme Elmy (1833-1918) - someone referred to among contemporaries as 'the grey matter in the brain' of the late-Victorian women's movement. A pacifist, humanitarian 'free-thinker', Wolstenholme Elmy was a controversial character and the first woman ever to speak from a public platform on the topic of marital rape. Lauded by Emmeline Pankhurst as 'first' among the infamous militant suffragettes of the Women's Social and Political Union, Wolstenholme Elmy was one of Britain's great feminist pioneers and, in her own words, an 'initiator' of many high-profile campaigns from the nineteenth into the twentieth century. Wright draws on an extensive resource of unpublished correspondence and other sources to produce an enduring portrait that does justice to Wolstenholme Elmy's momentous achievements. -- .

Women, Dowries and Agency Marriage in Fifteenth-Century Valencia

Women, Dowries and Agency Marriage in Fifteenth-Century Valencia

Author: Dana Wessell Lightfoot Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/11/2013

This book examines labouring-status women in late medieval Valencia as they negotiated the fundamentally defining experience of their lives: marriage. Through the use of notarial records and civil court cases, it argues that the socio-economic and immigrant status of these women greatly enhanced their ability to exercise agency not only in choosing a spouse and gathering dotal assets, but also in controlling this property after they wed. Although the prevailing legal code in Valencia appeared to give wives little authority over these assets, court records demonstrate that they were still able to negotiate a measure of control. In these actions, labouring-status wives exercised agency by protecting their marital goods from harm, using legal statutes to their own advantage. In looking at the experiences of labouring-status women, this monograph shifts the debate regarding women's access to and control of property in the medieval period. Exploring a group previously unexamined by scholars, it argues that our understanding of women's marital strategies changes, challenging the central role of blood and marital kin in these negotiations. -- .

Queen and Country Same-Sex Desire in the British Armed Forces, 1939-45

Queen and Country Same-Sex Desire in the British Armed Forces, 1939-45

Author: Emma Vickers Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/11/2013

The first study of its kind in the UK, Queen and country examines the complex intersection between same-sex desire and the British Armed Forces during the Second World War. It illuminates how men and women lived, loved and survived in an institution which, at least publicly, was unequivocally hostile towards same-sex activity within its ranks. Queen and country also tells a story of selective remembrance and the politics of memory, exploring specifically why same-sex desire continues to be absent from the historical record of the war. In examining this absence, and the more intimate minutiae of cohesion, homosociability and desire, this study pushes far beyond traditional military history in order to cast new light on one of the most widely discussed conflicts of the twentieth century. -- .

Imagining Caribbean Womanhood Race, Nation and Beauty Competitions, 1929-70

Imagining Caribbean Womanhood Race, Nation and Beauty Competitions, 1929-70

Author: Rochelle Rowe Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/10/2013

Over fifty years after Jamaican and Trinidadian independence, Imagining Caribbean womanhood examines the links between beauty and politics in the Anglophone Caribbean, providing a first cultural history of Caribbean beauty competitions, spanning from Kingston to London. It traces the origins and transformation of female beauty contests in the British Caribbean from 1929 to 1970, through the development of cultural nationalism, race-conscious politics and decolonisation. The beauty contest, a seemingly marginal phenomenon, is used to illuminate the persistence of racial supremacy, the advance of consumer culture and the negotiation of race and nation through the idealised performance of cultured, modern beauty. Modern Caribbean femininity was intended to be politically functional but also commercially viable and subtly eroticised. The lively discussion surrounding beauty competitions, examined in this book, reveals that femininity was used to shape ideas about Caribbean modernity, citizenship, and political and economic freedom. This cultural history of Caribbean beauty competitions will be of value to scholarship on beauty, Caribbean studies, postcolonial studies, gender studies, 'race' and racism studies and studies of the body. -- .

Gender, Nation and Conquest in the High Middle Ages Nest of Deheubarth

Gender, Nation and Conquest in the High Middle Ages Nest of Deheubarth

Author: Susan M. Johns Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/10/2013

Nest of Deheubarth was one of the most notorious women of the Middle Ages, mistress of Henry I and many other men, famously beautiful and strong-willed, object of one of the most notorious abduction/elopements of the period and ancestress of one of the most famous dynasties in medieval Ireland, the Fitzgeralds. This volume sheds light on women, gender, imperialism and conquest in the Middle Ages. From it emerges a picture of a woman who, though remarkable, was not exceptional, representative not of a group of victims or pawns in the dramatic transformations of the high Middle Ages but powerful and decisive actors. The book examines beauty, love, sex and marriage and the interconnecting identities of Nest as wife/concubine/mistress, both at the time and in the centuries since her death, when for Welsh writers and other commentators she has proved a powerful symbol. -- .

Modern Women on Trial Sexual Transgression in the Age of the Flapper

Modern Women on Trial Sexual Transgression in the Age of the Flapper

Author: Lucy Bland Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/09/2013

Modern women on trial looks at several sensational trials involving drugs, murder, adultery, miscegenation and sexual perversion in the period 1918-24. The trials, all with young female defendants, were presented in the media as morality tales, warning of the dangers of sensation-seeking and sexual transgression. The book scrutinises the trials and their coverage in the press to identify concerns about modern femininity. The flapper later became closely associated with the 'roaring' 1920s, but in the period immediately after the Great War she represented not only newness and hedonism, but also a frightening, uncertain future. This figure of the modern woman was a personification of the upheavals of the time, representing anxieties about modernity, and instabilities of gender, class, race and national identity. This accessible, extensively researched book will be of interest to all those interested in social, cultural or gender history. -- .

Housewives and Citizens Domesticity and the Women's Movement in England, 1928-64

Housewives and Citizens Domesticity and the Women's Movement in England, 1928-64

Author: Caitriona Beaumont Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/09/2013

This book explores the contribution that five conservative, voluntary and popular women's organisations made to women's lives and to the campaign for women's rights throughout the period 1928-64. The book challenges existing histories of the women's movement that suggest the movement went into decline during the inter-war period, only to be revived by the emergence of the Women's Liberation Movement in the late 1960s. It is argued that the term 'women's movement' must be revised to allow a broader understanding of female agency encompassing feminist, political, religious and conservative women's groups who campaigned to improve the status of women throughout the twentieth century. The book provides a radical re-assessment of this period of women's history and in doing so makes a significant contribution to ongoing debates about the shape and impact of the women's movement in twentieth-century Britain. -- .

Modern Women on Trial Sexual Transgression in the Age of the Flapper

Modern Women on Trial Sexual Transgression in the Age of the Flapper

Author: Lucy Bland Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/09/2013

Modern women on trial looks at several sensational trials involving drugs, murder, adultery, miscegenation and sexual perversion in the period 1918-24. The trials, all with young female defendants, were presented in the media as morality tales, warning of the dangers of sensation-seeking and sexual transgression. The book scrutinises the trials and their coverage in the press to identify concerns about modern femininity. The flapper later became closely associated with the 'roaring' 1920s, but in the period immediately after the Great War she represented not only newness and hedonism, but also a frightening, uncertain future. This figure of the modern woman was a personification of the upheavals of the time, representing anxieties about modernity, and instabilities of gender, class, race and national identity. This accessible, extensively researched book will be of interest to all those interested in social, cultural or gender history. -- .

Women, Travel and Identity Journeys by Rail and Sea, 1870-1940

Women, Travel and Identity Journeys by Rail and Sea, 1870-1940

Author: Emma Robinson-Tomsett Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/06/2013

The years between 1870 and 1940 are often considered a 'golden age' of travel: as larger and evermore sumptuous ships and trains were built, including the Orient Express, Blue Train, Lusitania and Normandie, journeying abroad became, and remains today, synonymous with chic, splendour and luxury. Utilising women's diaries and letters, art, advertising, fiction and etiquette guides, this book considers the journey's impact upon understandings of female identity, definitions of femininity, modernity, glamour, class, travel, tourism, leisure and sexual opportunity and threat during this period. It explores women's relationship with train and ship technology; cultural understandings of the journey; public expectations of women journeyers; how women journeyed in practice: their use of journey space, sociability with both Western and 'Other' non-Western journeyers, experience of love, sex and danger during the journey; and how women fashioned a journeyer identity which fused their existing domestic identities with new journey identities such as the journey chronicler. The journey is revealed to be an experience of sociability as much as mobility, dominated by ideas of respectability and reputation, class, power, vision and observation and home as well as the foreign and new. -- .

Infidel Feminism Secularism, Religion and Women's Emancipation, England 1830-1914

Infidel Feminism Secularism, Religion and Women's Emancipation, England 1830-1914

Author: Laura Schwarz Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/02/2013

Infidel feminism is the first in-depth study of a distinctive brand of women's rights that emerged out of the Victorian Secularist movement. It looks at the lives and work of a number of female activists, whose renunciation of religion shaped their struggle for emancipation. Anti-religious or secular ideas were fundamental to the development of feminist thought, but have, until now, been almost entirely passed over in the historiography of the Victorian and Edwardian women's movement. In uncovering an important tradition of Freethinking feminism, this book reveals an ongoing radical and free love current connecting Owenite feminism with the more 'respectable' post-1850 women's movement and the 'New Women' of the early twentieth century. This book will be invaluable to both scholars and students of social and cultural history and feminist thought, and to interdisciplinary studies of religion and secularisation, as well as those interested in the history of women's movements more broadly. -- .

Women Police Gender, Welfare and Surveillance in the Twentieth Century

Women Police Gender, Welfare and Surveillance in the Twentieth Century

Author: Louise Jackson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/12/2012

Women Police examines the professional roles, identities, activities and everyday experiences of women employed within the UK police service since the First World War against a backdrop of social and cultural change. As the first in-depth historical study of women's involvement in uniform, plain-clothes and undercover policing in the period before formal integration with male officers in the 1970s, it charts the relationship between gender, surveillance and penal-welfare strategies. For much of the twentieth century women police played a 'specialist' role in the detection and prevention of child abuse and neglect, the investigation of sexual violence and, in London, the regulation of prostitution. The book shows how women officers fashioned their own 'feminine' occupational culture and style of working in relation to male colleagues, other professionals and the women and children they encountered. Jackson concludes by examining experiences at the end of the twentieth century, comparing and contrasting the differing concepts of 'equality' that have shaped women's involvement in the police service. -- .

Being Boys Youth, Leisure and Identity in the Inter-War Years

Being Boys Youth, Leisure and Identity in the Inter-War Years

Author: Melanie Tebbutt Format: Hardback Release Date: 21/02/2012

This original and fresh approach to the emotions of adolescence focuses on the leisure lives of working-class boys and young men in the inter-war years. Being Boys challenges many stereotypes about their behaviour. It offers new perspectives on familiar and important themes in interwar social and cultural history, ranging from the cinema and mass consumption to boys' clubs, personal advice pages, street cultures, dancing, sexuality, mobility and the body. It draws on many autobiographies and personal accounts and is particularly distinctive in offering an unusual insight into working-class adolescence through the teenage diaries of the author's father, which are interwoven with the book's broader analysis of contemporary leisure developments. Being Boys will be of interest to scholars and students across the humanities and social sciences and is also relevant to those teaching and studying in the fields of child development, education, and youth and community studies. -- .

Modern Motherhood Women and Family in England, 1945-2000

Modern Motherhood Women and Family in England, 1945-2000

Author: Angela Davis Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/02/2012

This book examines women's experiences of motherhood in England in the years between 1945 and 2000. Based on a new body of 160 oral history interviews, the book offers the first comprehensive historical study of the experience of motherhood in the second half of the twentieth century. Motherhood is an area where a number of discourses and practices meet. The book therefore forms a thematic study looking at aspects of mothers' lives such as education, health care, psychology, labour market trends and state intervention. Looking through the prism of motherhood provides a way of understanding the complex social changes that have taken place in the post-war world. This book will be essential reading for students and researchers in the field of twentieth-century British social history. However it will also be of interest to scholars in related fields and a general readership with an interest in British social history, and the history of family and community in modern Britain. 'A fascinating survey of women's experience of motherhood', 'eminently readable', 'a solid and thoughtful study', 'an outstanding piece of oral history', and 'ambitiously wide ranging'. The judging panel for the Women's History Network Book Prize, 2013. -- .

The Business of Everyday Life Gender, Practice and Social Politics in England, C.1600-1900

The Business of Everyday Life Gender, Practice and Social Politics in England, C.1600-1900

Author: Beverly Lemire, Kim Latham Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/01/2012

From 1600 to 1900 a growing consumerism fired the English economy, shaping the priorities of individuals, and determining the allocation of resources within families. Everyday business might mean making a trip to the pawnbroker, giving a loan to a trusted friend of selling off a coat, all to make ends meet. Both women and men engaged in this daily budgeting, but women's roles were especially important in achieving some level of comfort and avoiding penury. In some communities, the daily practices in place in the seventeenth century persisted into the twentieth, whilst other groups adopted new ways, such as using numbers to chart domestic affairs and turning to the savings banks that appeared in the nineteenth century. In the material world of the past and in the changing habits of earlier generations lie crucial turning points. This book explores these previously under-researched patterns and practices that gave shape to modern consumer society. -- .

The Independent Man Citizenship and Gender Politics in Georgian England

The Independent Man Citizenship and Gender Politics in Georgian England

Author: Matthew McCormack Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/01/2012

'Independence' was an important ideal for men in Georgian England. In this period, however, the word meant much more than simply the virtues of self-sufficiency and impartiality. Most people believed that obligations absolutely compromised freedom and conscience, whereas 'independence' was associated with manly virtue and physical vigour. Fundamentally, the political world was thought to consist of 'independent men', exercising their consciences and standing up for the general good. As such, Georgians thought about political action and masculine virtue very differently to the ways in which we do today. In this study, newly available in paperback, Matthew McCormack establishes the links between the histories of masculinity and politics, highlighting the centrality of 'manly' ideals in the political world and - conversely - the role of politics in the operation of gender ideology. -- .

Women of the Right Spirit Paid Organisers of the Women's Social and Political Union (Wspu), 1904-18

Women of the Right Spirit Paid Organisers of the Women's Social and Political Union (Wspu), 1904-18

Author: Krista Cowman Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/12/2011

This book is the first investigation on how official organizers built and sustained the national militant campaign of the Women's Social and Political Union between 1903 and 1918. Whilst the overall policy of the Union was devised by an ever-decreasing circle of women, centred around the mother-daughter team of Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst, much of its actual activity, including its more extreme militant actions such as arson, was devised and implemented by these organizers who worked in the provinces and in London. Women of the right spirit reveals organizers to be a diverse bunch of women, whose class backgrounds ranged from the aristocratic to the extremely impoverished. It describes the ways in which they were recruited and deployed, and the work they undertook throughout Britain. The exhausting pace of their itinerant life is revealed as well as the occasions when organizers fell out with their employers or their own branches. Taking the story of the WSPU's workers up to the end of the First World War, it considers what directions they took when votes for women became a reality. The book will appeal to academics, postgraduates and undergraduates with an interest in women's history, as well as a more general readership wishing to understand the extent of support for the votes for women campaign and the mechanisms through which it organized. -- .

Jewish Women in Europe in the Middle Ages A Quiet Revolution

Jewish Women in Europe in the Middle Ages A Quiet Revolution

Author: Simha Goldin Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/11/2011

Goldin's study explores the relationships between men and women within Jewish society living in Germany, northern France and England among the Christian population over a period of some 350 years. Looking at original Hebrew sources to conduct a social analysis, he takes us from the middle of the tenth century until the middle of the second half of the fourteenth century, when the Christian population had expelled the Jews from almost all of the places they were living. Particularly fascinating are the attitudes towards women, as well as their changes in social status. By examining the factors involved in these issues, including views of the leadership, economic influences, internal power politics and gender struggles, Goldin's book provides a greater understanding of the functioning of these communities. This volume will be of great interest to historians of medieval Europe, gender and religion. -- .

Women'S Medical Work in Early Modern France

Women'S Medical Work in Early Modern France

Author: Susan Broomhall Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/11/2011

Women have long been crucial to the provision of medical services, both in the treatment of sickness and in maintaining health. In this study, Susan Broomhall situates the practices and perceptions of women's medical work in France in the context of the sixteenth century and its medical evolution and innovations. She argues that early modern understandings of medical practice and authority were highly flexible and subject to change. She furthermore examines how a focus on female practitioners, who cut across most sectors of early modern medical practice, can reveal the multifaceted phenomenon of these negotiations for authority. This new paperback edition of Women's medical work in early modern France skilfully combines detailed research with a clear presentation of the existing literature of women's medical work, making it invaluable to students of gender and medical history. -- .

Elizabeth Wolstenholme Elmy and the Victorian Feminist Movement The Biography of an Insurgent Woman

Elizabeth Wolstenholme Elmy and the Victorian Feminist Movement The Biography of an Insurgent Woman

Author: Maureen Wright Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/09/2011

This book provides the first full-length biography of Elizabeth Wolstenholme Elmy (1833-1918) - someone referred to among contemporaries as 'the grey matter in the brain' of the late-Victorian women's movement. A pacifist, humanitarian 'free-thinker', Wolstenholme Elmy was a controversial character and the first woman ever to speak from a public platform on the topic of marital rape. Lauded by Emmeline Pankhurst as 'first' among the infamous militant suffragettes of the Women's Social and Political Union, Wolstenholme Elmy was one of Britain's great feminist pioneers and, in her own words, an 'initiator' of many high-profile campaigns from the nineteenth into the twentiethth century. Wright draws on an extensive resource of unpublished correspondence and other sources to produce an enduring portrait that does justice to Wolstenholme Elmy's momentous achievements. -- .

Love, Intimacy and Power Marriage and Patriarchy in Scotland, 1650-1850

Love, Intimacy and Power Marriage and Patriarchy in Scotland, 1650-1850

Author: Katie Barclay Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/08/2011

Through an analysis of the correspondence of over one hundred couples from the Scottish elites across the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries, this book explores how ideas around the nature of emotional intimacy, love, and friendship within marriage adapted to a modernising economy and society. Patriarchy continued to be the central model for marriage across the period and as a result, women found spaces to hold power within the family, but could not translate it to power beyond the household. Comparing the Scottish experience to that across Europe and North America, Barclay shows that throughout the eighteenth-century, far from being a side-note in European history, Scottish ideas about gender and marriage became culturally dominant. This book will be vital to those studying and teaching Scottish social history, and those interested in the history of marriage and gender. It will also appeal to feminists interested in the history of patriarchy. -- .

Destined for a Life of Service Defining African-Jamaican Womanhood, 1865-1938

Destined for a Life of Service Defining African-Jamaican Womanhood, 1865-1938

Author: Henrice Altink Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/06/2011

Based on a wide range of original sources, including folktales, anthropological studies, court statements, poetry and speeches, this book sheds new light on the struggle of people of African descent for full and equal citizenship in the post-emancipation British Caribbean. It examines the messages that African-Jamaican women were given about their place and roles from within and outside their own community, the extent to which these messages intersected with class and colour ideologies, and African-Jamaican women's attempts to realise these ideals of femininity amidst various constraints. Incorporating the full realm of African-Jamaican women's experiences, exploring not just their sexuality and reproduction but also their roles as labourers, citizens and freedom fighters, the book also links shifting gender ideologies to citizenship, race and nation. Essential reading for undergraduates and graduates interested in gender within the British Caribbean during the critical transformative period between 1865 and 1938, it will also interest political scientists and other scholars working on questions of nationalism, transnationalism and the gendered nature of citizenship. -- .

Living in Sin Cohabiting as Husband and Wife in Nineteenth-Century England

Living in Sin Cohabiting as Husband and Wife in Nineteenth-Century England

Author: Ginger Frost Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/05/2011

Living in sin is the first book-length study of cohabitation in nineteenth-century England, based on research into the lives of hundreds of couples. 'Common-law' marriages did not have any legal basis, so the Victorian courts had to wrestle with unions that resembled marriage in every way, yet did not meet its most basic requirements. The majority of those who lived in irregular unions did so because they could not marry legally. Others chose not to marry, from indifference, from class differences, or because they dissented from marriage for philosophical reasons. This book looks at each motivation in turn, highlighting class, gender and generational differences, as well as the reactions of wider kin and community. Frost shows how these couples slowly widened the definition of legal marriage, preparing the way for the more substantial changes of the twentieth century, making this a valuable resource for all those interested in Gender and Social History. -- .

The Military Leadership of Matilda of Canossa, 1046-1115

The Military Leadership of Matilda of Canossa, 1046-1115

Author: David Hay Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/12/2010

This is the first account in English of the entire, forty year military career of one of the most powerful women of the Middle Ages. Challenging the boundaries between military and gender history, it explains how one famous noblewoman rose to the defense of the reforming papacy, defeated the Holy Roman Emperor and turned the tide of the first great war between Church and State. The military leadership of Matilda of Canossa adopts an interdisciplinary perspective towards the abundant and diverse sources for her life, reading the narrative sources against the letters, polemics, diplomas and canonical collections. It combines these to reconstruct Matilda's campaigns in painstaking detail, and reconsiders the limits of medieval women's military agency in light of her demonstrable successes. Both scholarly and accessible, all Latin quotations in the book are translated and the introduction provides a primer on the 'Investiture Contest'. This work will be of greatest value to specialists in medieval gender, military and church history. -- .

Myth and Materiality in a Woman's World Shetland 1800-2000

Myth and Materiality in a Woman's World Shetland 1800-2000

Author: Lynn Abrams Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/06/2010

The place of women in Shetland society is unique. In this isolated island group off the north of Scotland, women dominated the family, economy and the cultural imagination for 200 years. Here, women were numerically preponderant and economically vital. They maintained families and communities because men were absent. In their minds they constructed an identity of themselves as 'liberated' long before organised feminism was invented. It examines the opportunities and life experiences of women in a place where more of them worked and fewer got married than anywhere else in the British Isles. And it is about the relationship between myth-making and historical materiality and the ways in which the people of this northern archipelago have imagined their past. Reconstructing this 'woman's world' from fragments of cultural experience captured in written and oral sources, the author recreates and explores Shetland using its inhabitants' material experience and personal testimony. -- .

Artisans of the Body in Early Modern Italy Identities, Families and Masculinities

Artisans of the Body in Early Modern Italy Identities, Families and Masculinities

Author: Sandra Cavallo, Tessa (Research Associate) Storey Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/06/2010

This groundbreaking study explores the role of those involved in various aspects of the care, comfort and appearance of the body in seventeenth and early eighteenth-century Italy, bringing to light the strong cultural affinities and social ties between barber-surgeons and the apparently distant trades of jeweller, tailor, wigmaker and upholsterer. Drawing on contemporary understandings of the body, the author shows that shared concerns about health and well-being permeated the professional cultures of these medical and non-medical occupations. At the same time the detailed analysis of the life-course, career patterns and family experience of 'artisans of the body' offers unprecedented insight into the world of the urban middling sorts. The book will represent essential reading for scholars and students of gender, family and urban history in the early modern age, and will equally appeal to historians of the body and of the medical occupations. -- .

Women and the Shaping of British Methodism Persistent Preachers, 1807-1907

Women and the Shaping of British Methodism Persistent Preachers, 1807-1907

Author: Jennifer M. Lloyd Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/04/2010

A response to the prominent Methodist historian David Hempton's call to analyse women's experience within Methodism, this book is the first to deal with British Methodist women preachers over the entire nineteenth century. The author covers women preachers in Wesley's lifetime, the reason why some Methodist sects allowed women to preach and others did not, and the experience of Bible Christian and Primitive Methodist female evangelists before 1850. She also describes the many other ways in which women supported their chapel communities. The book also includes discussion of the careers of mid-century women revivalists, the opportunities home and foreign missions offered for female evangelism, the emergence of deaconess evangelists and Sisters of the People in late century, and the brief revival of female itinerancy among the Bible Christians. -- .

The Shadow of Marriage Singleness in England, 1914-60

The Shadow of Marriage Singleness in England, 1914-60

Author: Katherine Holden Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 18/03/2010

This book stakes out new territory within an exciting, emerging field of study. Not only does it uncover the history of a neglected group, but it also offers valuable insights into the significance of marital status which are equally relevant to current debates on marriage and family. The book examines representations and experiences of men and women who never married between 1914 and 1960, drawing upon an exceptionally wide range of sources including biographies, oral histories, novels, films, government statistics and social surveys. An introductory chapter on work and non-familial lifestyles highlights the significance of age, generation and gender. The main focus in the rest of the book is on unmarried men and women's intimate, sexual, familial and professional relationships. These raise important questions about how these categories have been defined and expose power relations between married and single people. The material on adult/child relationships is particularly innovative. The author probes the boundaries of the nuclear family in the mid-twentieth century through her account of the high levels of interest and involvement in children's care and education by unmarried women as well as largely invisible relationships between children and unmarried men. As the first major study of the history of single women and men in England, this will be a valuable resource for researchers and students in social history, gender studies, women's studies, social policy and sociology. Its accessible style and the inclusion of personal material from the author's life and family will undoubtedly also attract a wider readership. -- .

Gender and Housing in Soviet Russia Private Life in a Public Space

Gender and Housing in Soviet Russia Private Life in a Public Space

Author: Lynne Attwood Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/03/2010

This book explores the housing problem throughout the seventy years of Soviet history. It looks at changing political ideology on appropriate forms of housing under socialism, successive government policies on housing, and the meaning and experience of 'home' for Soviet citizens. Ultimately, it examines the use of housing to alter gender relations, and the ways in which domestic space was differentially experienced by men and women. The material, taken from Soviet magazines and journals, demonstrates how official ideas on housing and daily life changed during the course of the Soviet era, and how they were propagandised to the population. Through a series of in-depth interviews, the book also draws on the memories of people with direct experience of Soviet housing and domestic life. More than a history of housing, the book is a social history of daily life which will appeal both to scholars and those with a general interest in the Soviet era. -- .

The Feminine Public Sphere Middle-Class Women and Civic Life in Scotland, c. 1870-1914

The Feminine Public Sphere Middle-Class Women and Civic Life in Scotland, c. 1870-1914

Author: Megan Smitley Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/11/2009

At a time when women were barred from clerical roles, middle-class women made use of the informal power structures of Victorian and Edwardian associationalism in order to actively participate as citizens. This investigation of women's part in civic life provides a fresh approach to the 'public sphere', illuminates women as agents of a middle-class identity and develops the notion of a 'feminine public sphere', or the web of associations, institutions and discourses used by disenfranchised middle-class women to express their citizenship. The extent of middle-class women's contribution to civic life is examined through their involvement in reforming and philanthropic associations as well as local government. Making use of a range of previously untapped sources, this fascinating book will appeal in particular to those with an interest in Gender History and Scottish History. -- .

Murder and Morality in Victorian Britain The Story of Madeleine Smith

Murder and Morality in Victorian Britain The Story of Madeleine Smith

Author: Eleanor Gordon, Gwyneth Nair Format: Hardback Release Date: 21/08/2009

This book explores the life of Madeleine Smith, who in 1857 was tried for poisoning her secret lover. As well as charting the course of this illicit relationship and Madeleine's subsequent trial, the authors draw on a wide range of sources to pursue themes such as the nature of gender relations and the extent of women's social and commercial activities, and to bring vividly to life the world of the mid-Victorian middle class.The book contains new discoveries about Madeleine's long and colourful life after the trial which confirm the view that it is only in fiction that the bad end unhappily. The book will be of interest to academic social historians, but the fascination of its subject matter and the way in which much rich material is used to evoke a vivid sense of time and place, will also promote a wider interest among a more general readership. -- .

Murder and Morality in Victorian Britain The Story of Madeleine Smith

Murder and Morality in Victorian Britain The Story of Madeleine Smith

Author: Eleanor Gordon, Gwyneth Nair Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 21/08/2009

This book explores the life of Madeleine Smith, who in 1857 was tried for poisoning her secret lover. As well as charting the course of this illicit relationship and Madeleine's subsequent trial, the authors draw on a wide range of sources to pursue themes such as the nature of gender relations and the extent of women's social and commercial activities, and to bring vividly to life the world of the mid-Victorian middle class.The book contains new discoveries about Madeleine's long and colourful life after the trial which confirm the view that it is only in fiction that the bad end unhappily. The book will be of interest to academic social historians, but the fascination of its subject matter and the way in which much rich material is used to evoke a vivid sense of time and place, will also promote a wider interest among a more general readership. -- .

Living in Sin Cohabiting as Husband and Wife in Nineteenth-Century England

Living in Sin Cohabiting as Husband and Wife in Nineteenth-Century England

Author: Ginger Frost Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/11/2008

Living in sin is the first book-length study of cohabitation in nineteenth-century England, based on research into the lives of hundreds of couples. 'Common-law' marriages did not have any legal basis, so the Victorian courts had to wrestle with unions that resembled marriage in every way, yet did not meet its most basic requirements. The majority of those who lived in irregular unions did so because they could not marry legally. Others, though, chose not to marry, from indifference, from class differences, or because they dissented from marriage for philosophical reasons. This book looks at each motivation in turn, highlighting class, gender and generational differences, as well as the reactions of wider kin and community. Frost shows how these couples slowly widened the definition of legal marriage, preparing the way for the more substantial changes of the twentieth century, making this a valuable resource for all those interested in Gender and Social History. -- .

The Military Leadership of Matilda of Canossa, 1046-1115

The Military Leadership of Matilda of Canossa, 1046-1115

Author: David J. Hay Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/03/2008

This is the first account in English of the entire, 40-year military career of one of the most powerful women of the Middle Ages. Challenging the boundaries between military and gender history, it explains how one famous noblewoman rose to the defence of the reforming papacy, defeated the Holy Roman Emperor and turned the tide of the first great war between Church and State. The military leadership of Matilda of Canossa adopts an interdisciplinary perspective towards the abundant and diverse sources for her life, reading the narrative sources against the letters, polemics, diplomas and canonical collections. It combines these to reconstruct Matilda's campaigns in painstaking detail, and reconsiders the limits of medieval women's military agency in light of her demonstrable successes. Both scholarly and accessible, all Latin quotations in the book are translated and the introduction provides a primer on the 'Investiture Contest'. This work will be of greatest value to specialists in medieval gender, military and church history. -- .

Artisans of the Body in Early Modern Italy Identities, Families and Masculinities

Artisans of the Body in Early Modern Italy Identities, Families and Masculinities

Author: Sandra Cavallo, Tessa (Research Associate) Storey Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/12/2007

This groundbreaking study explores the role of those involved in various aspects of the care, comfort and appearance of the body in seventeenth and early eighteenth-century Italy, bringing to light the strong cultural affinities and social ties between barber-surgeons and the apparently distant trades of jeweller, tailor, wigmaker and upholsterer. Drawing on contemporary understandings of the body, the author shows that shared concerns about health and well-being permeated the professional cultures of these medical and non-medical occupations. At the same time the detailed analysis of the life-course, career patterns and family experience of 'artisans of the body' offers unprecedented insight into the world of the urban middling sorts. The book will represent essential reading for scholars and students of gender, family and urban history in the early modern age, and will equally appeal to historians of the body and of the medical occupations. -- .

Myth and Materiality in a Woman's World Shetland 1800-2000

Myth and Materiality in a Woman's World Shetland 1800-2000

Author: Lynn Abrams Format: Hardback Release Date: 10/11/2005

Shetland has a history unique in Europe, for over the past two centuries it was a place where women dominated the family, economy, and the cultural imagination. Women ran households and crofts without men. They maintained families and communities because men were absent. And they constructed in their minds an identity of themselves as 'liberated' long before organised feminism was invented. And yet, Shetland is a place which was made by the most masculine of societies - those of the Picts, Scots and above all the Vikings - and its contemporary identity still draws on the heroic exploits and sagas of medieval Norsemen. This book examines how against this tradition Shetland became a female place, and offers answers as to how, in this most isolated island community, the inhabitants transgressed and reversed their traditional gender roles. Reconstructing this 'woman's world' from fragments of cultural experience captured in written and oral sources, this book will appeal to scholars in the fields of social and cultural history, social anthropology, gender and women's studies. -- .

Masculinities in Politics and War Gendering Modern History

Masculinities in Politics and War Gendering Modern History

Author: Stefan Dudink Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/04/2004

Politics and war are crucial to the history of masculinity, yet have been neglected in the emergent historiography of masculinity. This book opens up new avenues in gender history by mapping masculinity's part in making revolution, waging war, building nations, and constructing welfare states. Preceded by extensive historical and theoretical introductions, the volume is clearly divided into sections on revolution, nation, politics and subjectivity. An innovative collection with contributions from an international group of eminent historians who are recognised experts in their fields, with essays on Europe, the United States, Latin America, Australia, Africa and Asia. Written in a highly accessible style, targeted at both students, professional historians and the interested general reader. -- .

Noblewomen, Aristocracy and Power in the Twelfth-Century Anglo-Norman Realm

Noblewomen, Aristocracy and Power in the Twelfth-Century Anglo-Norman Realm

Author: Susan M. Johns Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 10/07/2003

The first major work on noblewomen in the twelfth century and Normandy, and of the ways in which they exercised power. Offers an important reconceptualisation of women's role in aristocratic society and suggests new ways of looking at lordship and the ruling elite in the high middle ages. Considers a wide range of literary sources such as chronicles, charters, seals and governmental records to draw out a detailed picture of noblewomen in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm. Asserts the importance of the life-cycle in determining the power of aristocratic women. Demonstrates that the influence of gender on lordship was profound, complex and varied. -- .