History Books

Intensively researched, lovingly compiled, more accessible than ever, whatever your subject of interest - this is where you’ll find it.

The Third Reich A New History

The Third Reich A New History

Author: Michael Burleigh Format: Paperback Release Date: 06/07/2001

Setting Nazi Germany in a European context, this text shows how the Third Reich's abandonment of liberal democracy, decency and tolerance was widespread in Europe at the time. It shows how a radical, pseudo-religious movement seemed to offer salvation to a Germany exhausted by war, depression and inflation.

eBooks of the Month
South: The Story of Shackleton's Last Expedition, 1914-17

South: The Story of Shackleton's Last Expedition, 1914-17

Author: Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton Format: Paperback Release Date: 04/11/1999

April 2012 Guest Editor Paul Torday on South... I read this book only the other day. I can’t believe I’ve overlooked it until now. The story of Shackleton’s expedition to the Antarctic in 1914 just before war broke out is absolutely compelling. You can imagine yourself with Shackleton and his team, out on the sea ice with their ship being slowly crushed to death by pressure ridges. What amazing heroism, in circumstances that few people could have survived. An object lesson in how to write simply, yet produce powerful prose.

The Long Weekend: A Social History of Great Britain - 1918-1939

The Long Weekend: A Social History of Great Britain - 1918-1939

Author: Robert Graves Format: Paperback Release Date: 02/11/1995

October 2010 Guest Editor Juliet Gardiner on The Long Weekend... Published at the outbreak of war and largely relying on newspaper cuttings, The Long Weekend by the poet Robert Graves and Alan Hodge, still has a sharpness and immediacy that conjures up the anxieties, eccentricities and dashed hopes of the interwar years ranging over such diverse subjects as hiking and pacifism.

The People's War: Britain, 1939-45

The People's War: Britain, 1939-45

Author: Angus Calder Format: Paperback Release Date: 11/06/1992

October 2010 Guest Editor Juliet Gardiner on The People's War... Although Angus Calder’s The People’s War was published in 1969, it remains a magisterial work, an eminently readable and moving account of Britain’s Home Front that advances the view that the post war welfare state was the just entitlement for those who had ‘taken it’ during the Second World War.

eBooks of the Month
Orkneyinga Saga The History of the Earls of Orkney

Orkneyinga Saga The History of the Earls of Orkney

Author: Hermann Palsson Format: Paperback Release Date: 30/04/1981

Written around AD 1200 by an unnamed Icelandic author, the Orkneyinga Saga is an intriguing fusion of myth, legend and history. The only medieval chronicle to have Orkney as the central place of action, it tells of an era when the islands were still part of the Viking world, beginning with their conquest by the kings of Norway in the ninth century. The saga describes the subsequent history of the Earldom of Orkney and the adventures of great Norsemen such as Sigurd the Powerful, St Magnus the Martyr and Hrolf, the conqueror of Normandy. Savagely powerful and poetic, this is a fascinating depiction of an age of brutal battles, murder, sorcery and bitter family feuds.

A Short History of Nearly Everything

A Short History of Nearly Everything

Author: Bill Bryson Format: Paperback Release Date: 16/06/2016

The ultimate eye-opening journey through time and space, A Short History of Nearly Everything is the biggest-selling popular science book of the 21st century and has sold over 2 million copies. 'Truly impressive...It's hard to imagine a better rough guide to science.' Guardian 'A travelogue of science, with a witty, engaging, and well-informed guide' The Times Bill Bryson describes himself as a reluctant traveller, but even when he stays safely at home he can't contain his curiosity about the world around him. A Short History of Nearly Everything is his quest to understand everything that has happened from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization - how we got from there, being nothing at all, to here, being us. Bill Bryson's challenge is to take subjects that normally bore the pants off most of us, like geology, chemistry and particle physics, and see if there isn't some way to render them comprehensible to people who have never thought they could be interested in science. As a result, A Short History of Nearly Everything reveals the world in a way most of us have never seen it before.

eBooks of the Month
The Knife Man

The Knife Man

Author: Wendy Moore Format: Paperback Release Date: 03/04/2006

WINNER OF THE MEDICAL JOURNALISTS' OPEN BOOK AWARD 2005 Revered and feared in equal measure, John Hunter was the most famous surgeon of eighteenth-century London. Rich or poor, aristocrat or human freak, suffering Georgians knew that Hunter's skills might well save their lives but if he failed, their corpses could end up on his dissecting table, their bones and organs destined for display in his remarkable, macabre museum. Maverick medical pioneer, adored teacher, brilliant naturalist, Hunter was a key figure of the Enlightenment who transformed surgery, advanced biological understanding and even anticipated the evolutionary theories of Darwin. He provided inspiration both for Dr Jekyll and Dr Dolittle. But the extremes to which he went to pursue his scientific mission raised question marks then as now. John Hunter's extraordinary world comes to life in this remarkable, award-winning biography written by a wonderful new talent.

eBooks of the Month
Magic and Mystery in Tibet

Magic and Mystery in Tibet

Author: Alexandra David-Neel Format: Paperback Release Date: 27/07/2020

Alexandra David-Neel was the first European woman to meet the Dalai Lama and in 1924 became the first to enter the forbidden Tibetan capital, Lhasa.   She had already spent a decade travelling through China, living in a cave on the Tibetan border, where she learned about Buddhism from hermits, mystics and bandits. Magic & Mystery in Tibet, like Seven Pillars of Wisdom, attempts to bring ancient wisdom into the modern age. David-Neel records the seemingly magic feats performed by Buddhist monks; telepathy, ‘tumo’ breathing (the art of generating body heat to keep warm in freezing conditions), the ability to run for days at a time, the ability to defy gravity and the ability to become invisible.

A Child's History Of England

A Child's History Of England

Author: Charles Dickens Format: Paperback Release Date: 12/07/2008

This is a captivating history of England for children from one of the best-loved novelists of all time. Written just after David Copperfield, at the same time as "Bleak House", and in the engaging and conversational style typical of his most celebrated fiction, Dickens' "History of England for Children" is an undiscovered treasure trove of a book. This carefully selected, lightly abridged version shows traditional storytelling at its best. Dickens' lovable theatricality, witty observations and compelling narrative give children access to one of England's greatest writers, and to some of the most powerful stories from its past. For adults, it offers an engaging reminder of the English history we ought to know: who was Hereward the Wake, how was it that Thomas a Becket was murdered in Canterbury Cathedral, and was Canute really trying to stop the tide? Interesting, informative and accessible, "A Child's History of England" takes its reader on a fascinating journey, from Ancient England and the Romans to Victoria's reign and Dickens' own lifetime.

Young Stalin

Young Stalin

Author: Simon Sebag Montefiore Format: Paperback Release Date: 02/09/2021

Winner of the Costa Biography Award What makes a Stalin? Was he a Tsarist agent or Lenin's bandit? Was he to blame for his wife's death? When did the killing start? Based on revelatory research, here is the thrilling story of how a charismatic cobbler's son became a student priest, romantic poet, prolific lover, gangster mastermind and murderous revolutionary. Culminating in the 1917 revolution, Simon Sebag Montefiore's bestselling biography radically alters our understanding of the gifted politician and fanatical Marxist who shaped the Soviet empire in his own brutal image. This is the story of how Stalin became Stalin.

eBooks of the Month
A History of Modern Britain

A History of Modern Britain

Author: Andrew Marr Format: Paperback Release Date: 06/04/2017

A History of Modern Britain by Andrew Marr confronts head-on the victory of shopping over politics. This edition also includes an extra chapter charting the course from Blair to Brexit. It tells the story of how the great political visions of New Jerusalem or a second Elizabethan Age, rival idealisms, came to be defeated by a culture of consumerism, celebrity and self-gratification. In each decade, political leaders think they know what they are doing, but find themselves confounded. Every time, the British people turn out to be stroppier and harder to herd than predicted. Throughout, Britain is a country on the edge - first of invasion, then of bankruptcy, then on the vulnerable front line of the Cold War and later in the forefront of the great opening up of capital and migration now reshaping the world. This history follows all the political and economic stories, but deals too with comedy, cars, the war against homosexuals, Sixties anarchists, oil-men and punks, Margaret Thatcher's wonderful good luck, political lies and the true heroes of British theatre.

Stalingrad

Stalingrad

Author: Antony Beevor Format: Ebook Release Date: 06/07/2017

Penguin presents the unabridged downloadable audiobook edition of Stalingrad by Antony Beevor, read by Peter Noble. Antony Beevors Stalingrad is a harrowing look at one of historys darkest moments. In October 1942, a panzer officer wrote Stalingrad is no longer a town... Animals flee this hell; the hardest stones cannot bear it for long; only men endure. The battle for Stalingrad became the focus of Hitler and Stalins determination to win the gruesome, vicious war on the eastern front. The citizens of Stalingrad endured unimaginable hardship; the battle, with fierce hand-to-hand fighting in each room of each building, was brutally destructive to both armies. But the eventual victory of the Red Army, and the failure of Hitlers Operation Barbarossa, was the first defeat of Hitlers territorial ambitions in Europe, and the start of his decline. An extraordinary story of tactical genius, civilian bravery, obsession, carnage and the nature of war itself, Stalingrad will act as a testament to the vital role of the soviet war effort. A superb re-telling. Beevor combines a soldiers understanding of wars realities with the narrative techniques of a novelist . . . This is a book that lets the reader look into the face of battle Orlando Figes, Sunday Telegraph A brilliantly researched tour de force of military history Sarah Bradford, The Times Antony Beevor is the renowned author of Stalingrad, which won the Samuel Johnson Prize, the Wolfson Prize for History and the Hawthornden Prize for Literature, and Berlin, which received the first Longman-History Today Trustees Award. His books have sold nearly four million copies.

eBooks of the Month