10% off all books and free delivery over £40
Buy from our bookstore and 25% of the cover price will be given to a school of your choice to buy more books. *15% of eBooks.

Lily Lindon - Editorial Expert

Lily Lindon is a writer and editor living in London. She studied English Literature at Cambridge University, where she was also part of the Footlights comedy group. She was an Editor at Vintage, Penguin Random House, before becoming an editor and mentor at The Novelry. Her debut novel DOUBLE BOOKED ('the bisexual romcom of your wildest dreams', DIVA Magazine) was published in June 2022. She is on Twitter @lily_lindon and Instagram @bookymcbookface.

Follow on Social Media

Latest Reviews By Lily Lindon

Trust and Safety
You know when sometimes a book feels like it was written specifically for you? This is one of those for me.  I sometimes felt like the authors must have installed a Family Friend in my house from how specifically it skewered what me and my friends have been talking about recently. Blackett and Gleichman are experts of irony, and poking at hypocrisy, making their reader feel both smug and called out. Sharp as an artisanal vegetable peeler, outrageously horny and thrillingly ominous, Trust & Safety is the morality tale the queers need right now. It straddles wish-fulfilment and dystopia, ... View Full Review
Unsuitable
This history of lesbian fashion is written in a way which is both detailed and accessible, as satisfying to the casual reader as to the academic. With case studies of lesbians and ‘lesbian-adjacent’ figures that readers will likely be varyingly familiar with, including Sappho’s tunics and violets, to Anne Lister’s hats (comparing how the character is presented in the Gentleman Jack television show in a top hat, to how the historical figure likely dressed from her diaries, in bonnet and lace) to the drag kings and ‘impersonators’ of European performers in the 1920... View Full Review
The Love of My Afterlife
Romance publishing is enjoying a supernatural moment right now, which suits me just fine, as I love a big shiny high concept. In Kirsty Greenwood’s The Love of my Afterlife a romance-obsessed angel gives newly-dead Delphie a loophole – if she can find her soulmate on earth and have him kiss her within ten days, she’ll be allowed to live. But back alive, Delphie sees life in a whole new way, including the bad-boy-next-door-neighbour she thought hated her…  Considering this novel starts with a death and takes place in purgatory, it never makes the ... View Full Review
Making It
Issy used to spend her life at home, crafting pieces inspired by her pet chinchilla Abigail, trying to manage her depression, until a famous artist discovers her and invites her to work in London on a TV show which brings otherwise isolated crafters together.  The reader comes with Issy on her coming-of-age adventure as she discovers her sexuality (and how sex ‘can be silly’), living with a squad of equally fish-out-of-water flatmates in bizarre London rental accommodation, and meeting her surprisingly terrifying (and gorgeous) neighbour Aubrey…  A less brilliant writer would struggle to make the ... View Full Review
Bad Habit
Our unnamed narrator is a lyrical and sensitive storyteller, conjuring her world with jolting metaphors, sharp wit, and tender poetry. She doesn’t hold back any punches on brutality, but she also savours moments where she can elevate humans’ ability to be soft and lovely. Our unnamed narrator is a young trans woman, growing up in a hand-to-mouth suburb in Madrid, ever-watchful and sensitive to the ways in which her neighbours model and police gender, sexuality, class. As a child she is drawn to figures like the witch known as The Wig, and the gentle trans woman Margarita, ... View Full Review
The Fellowship of Puzzlemakers
‘Life is more complicated than any challenge I could set. Each of the solutions that make up this grid are the foundations of a fulfilling life, a happy life. So don’t just solve these clues, seek them out, experience them.’  If you like stories of communities of kindly eccentrics, you’ll enjoy meeting the uniquely clever and quirky fellowship – a cast who includes a labyrinth maker, jigsaw illustrator, wartime code-cracker, and, centrally, to Clay, a 25-year-old man who grew up with these fellows for adoptive family.  We open with the funeral of ... View Full Review
The Ministry of Time
Oh my God. This is one of the best books I’ve read in a very long time. (Pun intended?)  Another writer could have had this already brilliant and inventive take on the time travel idea (that a time machine could be used to transport strangers from the past into the present, and if that was done by the government, mightn’t they use an agent to assist/monitor that ‘time immigrant’?) but Bradley has then embedded this within rich multifaced layers – an aching love story, a shocking thriller, and an incisive exploration of &... View Full Review
The Start of Something
The Start of Something executes the perfect balance of intricate short story and cohesive novel, interlinking its ten sexual encounters (with some repeating cameos from previous characters), and a satisfying full-circle moment in the end. It’s a device which Williams uses to relentlessly question her own questions, to toss and turn ideas from different perspectives and angles – bisexuality as experienced by different genders and personalities, whether there is always a winner and loser in open relationships, whether it’s possible for women to perform passivity for the male gaze in a way that gives rather than ... View Full Review
The Comeback
From its opening prologue – the first-person voice deliberately crashing her car, along with her passenger – to its first chapters, Berman gives the reader a constant stream of questions, from the seemingly small to the global: why is this famous actress depressed, back living in suburbia with her resentful family? Why did her seemingly wonderful marriage end? Why doesn’t the producer who forged her career work with her anymore? Why, in her other world, was her younger sister expelled?  Berman navigates the lines of answering or opening these questions further, leaving some a satisfying, bittersweet mystery ... View Full Review
The Comeback
From its opening prologue – the first-person voice deliberately crashing her car, along with her passenger – to its first chapters, Berman gives the reader a constant stream of questions, from the seemingly small to the global: why is this famous actress depressed, back living in suburbia with her resentful family? Why did her seemingly wonderful marriage end? Why doesn’t the producer who forged her career work with her anymore? Why, in her other world, was her younger sister expelled?  Berman navigates the lines of answering or opening these questions further, leaving some mystery even at the ... View Full Review
The Scandalous Life of Ruby Devereaux
‘Welcome to my life in twelve men. Enjoy. Because I very much did.’  If you were a fan of The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid and looking for another book which follows an older, now-famous woman’s life through interviews, with a reveal at the end, then I think you’ve found it in The Scandalous Life of Ruby Devereaux (though of course it’s not exactly the same kind of reveal!)  The book roughly alternates chapters between Ruby’s modern life – involving the practicalities of writing ... View Full Review
Hooked
Fosh’s definition of addiction is perhaps surprising in its breadth: ‘using something outside of yourself to change the way you feel’. This is useful for challenging the stereotypes around addiction and to try to remove taboos around it, and allowing readers to more readily question their addictive behaviours even if they don’t come in ‘obvious’ forms: Fosh emphasises the broader definition of addiction she is using in this book, one which is not just alcohol or substance abuse, but also includes the perhaps lesser-discussed addictions around love and relationships, physical appearance, and ... View Full Review