LoveReading

Becoming a member of the LoveReading community is free.

No catches, no fine print just unadulterated book loving, with your favourite books saved to your own digital bookshelf.

New members get entered into our monthly draw to win £100 to spend in your local bookshop Plus lots lots more…

Find out more

Advertising & society

See below for a selection of the latest books from Advertising & society category. Presented with a red border are the Advertising & society books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Advertising & society books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Zoning China Online Video, Popular Culture, and the State

Zoning China Online Video, Popular Culture, and the State

Author: Luzhou (Lecturer, Monash University) Li Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/12/2019

An examination of cultural zoning in China considers why government regulation of online video is so much more lenient than regulation of broadcast television. In Zoning China, Luzhou Li investigates why the Chinese government regulates online video relatively leniently while tightly controlling what appears on broadcast television. Li argues that television has largely been the province of the state, even as the market has dominated the development of online video. Thus online video became a space where people could question state media and the state's preferred ideological narratives about the nation, history, and society. Li connects this relatively unregulated arena to the second channel that opened up in the early days of economic reform-piracy in all its permutations. She compares the dual cultural sphere to China's economic zoning; the marketized domain of online video is the cultural equivalent of the Special Economic Zones, which were developed according to market principles in China's coastal cities. Li explains that although the relaxed oversight of online video may seem to represent a loosening of the party-state's grip on media, the practice of cultural zoning in fact demonstrates the the state's strategic control of the media environment. She describes how China's online video industry developed into an original, creative force of production and distribution that connected domestic private production companies, transnational corporations, and a vast network of creative labor from amateurs to professional content creators. Li notes that China has increased state management of the internet since 2014, signaling that online and offline censorship standards may be unified. Cultural zoning as a technique of cultural governance, however, will likely remain.

Human Rights in the Age of Platforms

Human Rights in the Age of Platforms

Scholars from across law and internet and media studies examine the human rights implications of today's platform society. Today such companies as Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, and Twitter play an increasingly important role in how users form and express opinions, encounter information, debate, disagree, mobilize, and maintain their privacy. What are the human rights implications of an online domain managed by privately owned platforms? According to the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, adopted by the UN Human Right Council in 2011, businesses have a responsibility to respect human rights and to carry out human rights due diligence. But this goal is dependent on the willingness of states to encode such norms into business regulations and of companies to comply. In this volume, contributors from across law and internet and media studies examine the state of human rights in today's platform society. The contributors consider the datafication of society, including the economic model of data extraction and the conceptualization of privacy. They examine online advertising, content moderation, corporate storytelling around human rights, and other platform practices. Finally, they discuss the relationship between human rights law and private actors, addressing such issues as private companies' human rights responsibilities and content regulation. Contributors Anja Bechmann, Fernando Bermejo, Agnes Callamard, Mikkel Flyverbom, Rikke Frank Jorgensen, Molly K. Land, Tarlach McGonagle, Jens-Erik Mai, Joris van Hoboken, Glen Whelan, Jillian C. York, Shoshana Zuboff, Ethan Zuckerman Open access edition published with generous support from Knowledge Unlatched and the Danish Council for Independent Research.

The Information Manifold Why Computers Can't Solve Algorithmic Bias and Fake News

The Information Manifold Why Computers Can't Solve Algorithmic Bias and Fake News

Author: Antonio (Associate Professor, University of Louisville) Badia Format: Hardback Release Date: 03/12/2019

An argument that information exists at different levels of analysis-syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic-and an exploration of the implications. Although this is the Information Age, there is no universal agreement about what information really is. Different disciplines view information differently; engineers, computer scientists, economists, linguists, and philosophers all take varying and apparently disconnected approaches. In this book, Antonio Badia distinguishes four levels of analysis brought to bear on information: syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, and network-based. Badia explains each of these theoretical approaches in turn, discussing, among other topics, theories of Claude Shannon and Andrey Kolomogorov, Fred Dretske's description of information flow, and ideas on receiver impact and informational interactions. Badia argues that all these theories describe the same phenomena from different perspectives, each one narrower than the previous one. The syntactic approach is the more general one, but it fails to specify when information is meaningful to an agent, which is the focus of the semantic and pragmatic approaches. The network-based approach, meanwhile, provides a framework to understand information use among agents. Badia then explores the consequences of understanding information as existing at several levels. Humans live at the semantic and pragmatic level (and at the network level as a society), computers at the syntactic level. This sheds light on some recent issues, including fake news (computers cannot tell whether a statement is true or not, because truth is a semantic notion) and algorithmic bias (a pragmatic, not syntactic concern). Humans, not computers, the book argues, have the ability to solve these issues.

The Paradoxes of Network Neutralities

The Paradoxes of Network Neutralities

Author: Russell A. (Assistant Professor, Emerson College) Newman Format: Hardback Release Date: 03/12/2019

An argument that the movement for network neutrality was of a piece with its neoliberal environment, solidifying the continued existence of a commercially driven internet. Media reform activists rejoiced in 2015 when the FCC codified network neutrality, approving a set of Open Internet rules that prohibitedproviders from favoring some content and applications over others-only to have their hopes dashed two years later when the agency reversed itself. In this book, Russell Newman offers a unique perspective on these events, arguing that the movement for network neutrality was of a piece with its neoliberal environment rather than counter to it; perversely, it served to solidify the continued existence of a commercially dominant internet and even emergent modes of surveillance and platform capitalism. Going beyond the usual policy narrative of open versus closed networks, or public interest versus corporate power, Newman uses network neutrality as a lens through which to examine the ways that neoliberalism renews and reconstitutes itself, the limits of particular forms of activism, and the shaping of future regulatory processes and policies. Newman explores the debate's roots in the 1990s movement for open access, the transition to network neutrality battles in the 2000s, and the terms in which these battles were fought. By 2017, the debate had become unmoored from its own origins, and an emerging struggle against neoliberal sincerity points to a need to rethink activism surrounding media policy reform itself.

NSFW Sex, Humor, and Risk in Social Media

NSFW Sex, Humor, and Risk in Social Media

An exploration of how and why social media content is tagged as not safe for work and an argument against conflating sexual content with risk. The hashtag #NSFW (not safe for work) acts as both a warning and an invitation. NSFW tells users, We dare you to click on this link! And by the way, don't do it until after work! Unlike the specificity of movie and television advisories ( suggestive dialogue, sexual content ), NSFW signals, nonspecifically, sexually explicit content that ranges from nude selfies to pornography. NSFW looks at how and why social media content is tagged not safe and shows how this serves to conflate sexual content and risk. The authors argue that the notion of unsafety extends beyond the risk of losing one's job or being embarrassed at work to an unspecified sense of risk attached to sexually explicit media content and sexual communication in general. The authors examine NSFW practices of tagging and flagging on a range of social media platforms; online pornography and its dependence on technology; user-generated NSFW content-in particular, the dick pic and associated issues of consent, desire, agency, and social power; the deployment of risque humor in the workplace; and sexist and misogynist online harassment that functions as an enforcer of inequalities. They argue against the categorical effacement of sexual content by means of an all-purpose hashtag and urge us to shift considerations of safety from pictorial properties to issues of context and consent.

Italian Olive Oil Tins Guatelli Collection

Italian Olive Oil Tins Guatelli Collection

Author: Emanuela Rossi Format: Hardback Release Date: 11/11/2019

The Guatelli Collection is the most important collection of tin boxes for olive oil, from those for export to the ones destined for the domestic market, produced between the end of the nineteenth century and the end of the Second World War. The prestige of the collection lies in the fact that it features the first cliches that served as a reference for the print of the entire production: they are a clear testimony of how, in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, in Liguria and particularly in the city of Imperia, as a result of the increase in the production of olive oil, establishments were set up to provide lithographed tinplate packagings for the Italian exporting industry. So began the happy marriage between technological and industrial progress and artistic research that led to excellent results, not only from the commercial point of view but also as a means of transmitting the taste and the new languages of art, which were allowed to reach an ever wider audience. Text in English and Italian.

Soda Goes Pop Pepsi-Cola Advertising and Popular Music

Soda Goes Pop Pepsi-Cola Advertising and Popular Music

Author: Joanna K. Love Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 04/10/2019

From its 1939 'Nickel, Nickel' jingle to pathbreaking collaborations with Michael Jackson and Madonna to its pair of X Factor commercials in 2011 and 2012, Pepsi-Cola has played a leading role in drawing the American pop music industry into a synergetic relationship with advertising. This idea has been copied successfully by countless other brands over the years, and such commercial collaboration is commonplace today-but how did we get here? How and why have pop music aesthetics been co-opted to benefit corporate branding? What effect have Pepsi's music marketing practices in particular had on other brands, the advertising industry, and popular music itself? Soda Goes Pop investigates these and other vital questions around the evolving relationships between popular music and corporate advertising. Joanna K. Love joins musical analysis, historical research, and cultural theory to trace parallel shifts in these industries over eight decades. In addition to scholarly and industry resources, she draws on first-hand accounts, pop culture magazines, trade press journals, and other archival materials. Pepsi's longevity as an influential American brand, its legendary commercials, and its pioneering, relentless pursuit of alliances with American musical stars makes the brand a particularly instructive point of focus. Several of the company's most famous ad campaigns are prime examples of the practice of redaction, whereby marketers select, censor, and restructure musical texts to fit commercial contexts in ways that revise their aesthetic meanings and serve corporate aims. Ultimately, Love demonstrates how Pepsi's marketing has historically appropriated and altered images of pop icons and the meanings of hit songs, and how these commercials shaped relationships between the American music business, the advertising industry, and corporate brands. Soda Goes Pop is a rich resource for scholars and students of American studies, popular culture, advertising, broadcast media, and musicology. It is also an accessible and informative book for the general reader, as Love's musical and theoretical analyses are clearly presented for non-specialist audiences and readers with varying degrees of musical knowledge.

Soda Goes Pop Pepsi-Cola Advertising and Popular Music

Soda Goes Pop Pepsi-Cola Advertising and Popular Music

Author: Joanna K. Love Format: Hardback Release Date: 04/10/2019

From its 1939 Nickel, Nickel jingle to pathbreaking collaborations with Michael Jackson and Madonna to its pair of X Factor commercials in 2011 and 2012, Pepsi-Cola has played a leading role in drawing the American pop music industry into a synergetic relationship with advertising. This idea has been copied successfully by countless other brands over the years, and such commercial collaboration is commonplace today-but how did we get here? How and why have pop music aesthetics been co-opted to benefit corporate branding? What effect have Pepsi's music marketing practices in particular had on other brands, the advertising industry, and popular music itself? Soda Goes Pop investigates these and other vital questions around the evolving relationships between popular music and corporate advertising. Joanna K. Love joins musical analysis, historical research, and cultural theory to trace parallel shifts in these industries over eight decades. In addition to scholarly and industry resources, she draws on first-hand accounts, pop culture magazines, trade press journals, and other archival materials. Pepsi's longevity as an influential American brand, its legendary commercials, and its pioneering, relentless pursuit of alliances with American musical stars makes the brand a particularly instructive point of focus. Several of the company's most famous ad campaigns are prime examples of the practice of redaction, whereby marketers select, censor, and restructure musical texts to fit commercial contexts in ways that revise their aesthetic meanings and serve corporate aims. Ultimately, Love demonstrates how Pepsi's marketing has historically appropriated and altered images of pop icons and the meanings of hit songs, and how these commercials shaped relationships between the American music business, the advertising industry, and corporate brands. Soda Goes Pop is a rich resource for scholars and students of American studies, popular culture, advertising, broadcast media, and musicology. It is also an accessible and informative book for the general reader, as Love's musical and theoretical analyses are clearly presented for non-specialist audiences and readers with varying degrees of musical knowledge.

Material Noise Reading Theory as Artist's Book

Material Noise Reading Theory as Artist's Book

An argument that theoretical works can signify through their materiality-their noise, or such nonsemantic elements as typography-as well as their semantic content. In Material Noise, Anne Royston argues that theoretical works signify through their materiality-such nonsemantic elements as typography or color-as well as their semantic content. Examining works by Jacques Derrida, Avital Ronell, Georges Bataille, and other well-known theorists, Royston considers their materiality and design-which she terms noise -as integral to their meaning. In other words, she reads these theoretical works as complex assemblages, just as she would read an artist's book in all its idiosyncratic tangibility. Royston explores the formlessness and heterogeneity of the Encyclopedia Da Costa, which published works by Bataille, Andre Breton, and others; the use of layout and white space in Derrida's Glas; the typographic illegibility- static and interference -in Ronell's The Telephone Book; and the enticing surfaces of Mark C. Taylor's Hiding, its digital counterpart The Real: Las Vegas, NV, and Shelley Jackson's Skin. Royston then extends her analysis to other genres, examining two recent artists' books that express explicit theoretical concerns: Johanna Drucker's Stochastic Poetics and Susan Howe's Tom Tit Tot. Throughout, Royston develops the concept of artistic arguments, which employ signification that exceeds the semantics of a printed text and are not reducible to a series of linear logical propositions. Artistic arguments foreground their materiality and reflect on the media that create them. Moreover, Royston argues, each artistic argument anticipates some aspect of digital thinking, speaking directly to such contemporary concerns as hypertext, communication theory, networks, and digital distribution.

Digital Gaming and the Advertising Landscape

Digital Gaming and the Advertising Landscape

Author: Teresa Hera Format: Hardback Release Date: 12/08/2019

Advergames, persuasive games, advertising, entertaining persuasive communication

From Fingers to Digits An Artificial Aesthetic

From Fingers to Digits An Artificial Aesthetic

Essays on computer art and its relation to more traditional art, by a pioneering practitioner and a philosopher of artificial intelligence. In From Fingers to Digits, a practicing artist and a philosopher examine computer art and how it has been both accepted and rejected by the mainstream art world. In a series of essays, Margaret Boden, a philosopher and expert in artificial intelligence, and Ernest Edmonds, a pioneering and internationally recognized computer artist, grapple with key questions about the aesthetics of computer art. Other modern technologies-photography and film-have been accepted by critics as ways of doing art. Does the use of computers compromise computer art's aesthetic credentials in ways that the use of cameras does not? Is writing a computer program equivalent to painting with a brush? Essays by Boden identify types of computer art, describe the study of creativity in AI, and explore links between computer art and traditional views in philosophical aesthetics. Essays by Edmonds offer a practitioner's perspective, considering, among other things, how the experience of creating computer art compares to that of traditional art making. Finally, the book presents interviews in which contemporary computer artists offer a wide range of comments on the issues raised in Boden's and Edmonds's essays.

I Watch Therefore I Am The Political Economy of Chinese Television Advertising

I Watch Therefore I Am The Political Economy of Chinese Television Advertising

Author: Zixu Liu Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/07/2019