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Local history

See below for a selection of the latest books from Local history category. Presented with a red border are the Local history books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Local history books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Lost Folkestone

Lost Folkestone

Author: Alan F. Taylor Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/09/2020

The Kent coastal town of Folkestone lies at the foot of the North Downs, with France visible across the Strait of Dover. The town developed around the harbour built in the nineteenth century, both as a resort and a port for cross-Channel ferries. Hotels, theatres and a pier were built in this era to attract fashionable visitors, but in the twentieth century a wider range of incomers settled in the town. Folkestone was at the front line in two world wars and today its links with London and Continental Europe, via the M20 motorway, fast rail links and the Channel Tunnel, have seen further massive changes in the town. Lost Folkestone presents a portrait of a town from Victorian times to recent decades that has radically changed or disappeared today, showing not only the industries and buildings that have gone but also the people and street scenes, many popular places of entertainment and much more. This fascinating photographic history of lost Folkestone will appeal to all those who live in the town or know it well, as well as those who remember it from previous decades.

Secret Arundel

Secret Arundel

Author: Eddy Greenfield Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/09/2020

The town of Arundel in West Sussex is overlooked by Arundel Castle and the Roman Catholic cathedral, which was built through the support of the Duke of Norfolk, but the history of Arundel is built on much more than the castle and the dukes and earls. Secret Arundel unveils the lesser-known stories of its townspeople and events. These include the wartime German spy scandal that rocked the town's Home Guard and saw its second-in-command jailed in 1940, how escaped German POWs concealed themselves in a top-secret bunker that was originally intended to house resistance fighters in the event of a Nazi invasion, and the history of the town's jailhouse and some of those who found themselves locked behind its iron bars. With no fewer than three priories, a friary, a medieval church, a Gothic Revival cathedral and even a Commandery of the Knights Hospitallers nearby, Arundel has had a long and fascinating religious history. The town was also the site of a medieval Jewish community and a stronghold for nonconformism. In Secret Arundel the author explores the lost and disused churches and chapels dotted around the town and its immediate surroundings as well as other unusual stories. With tales of remarkable characters, unusual events and tucked-away or disappeared historical buildings and locations, Secret Arundel will appeal to all those with an interest in the history of this town in West Sussex.

Waterford Harbour

Waterford Harbour

Author: Andrew Doherty Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/09/2020

The Irish have an old phrase for the passing along of local culture and lore: 'O Ghluin go Gluin', or from knee to knee. In short, that stories told to children on the knee of their elders are in turn passed along to the next generation by the same process. But in the fishing community of Waterford, these tales or yarns were told to the author while drifting for salmon, in the company of fishermen. His father and other sailors had a bit of a reputation when it came to exaggeration, but over the years he has found more than a grain of truth in many of the stories.The harbour has centuries of tradition based on its extensive fishery and maritime trade. In these tales we relive the fear of the dreaded press gangs who raided the communities for crew, join in search of buried gold when pirates seized the sailing ship 'Earl of Sandwich' and witness the horror visited on the community in WWII when a German airplane bombed the rural idyll. On every page we learn something of this community, steeped in traditions, customs and an enviable spirit.

The Little History of Bristol

The Little History of Bristol

Author: Maurice Fells Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/09/2020

No one knows for certain when Bristol was founded. What we do know is that for the last 1,000 years and more it has been at the centre of national and international history, and was the first provincial borough to be upgraded to county status in 1373. From its earliest days Bristol's prosperity was linked to its port, especially with the importation of wine and tobacco and its involvement with the slave trade. Explorers sailed from Bristol on epic voyages and discovered new lands. For many years Bristol was the second or third largest English city. In recent times its economy has been built on the aerospace industry and the construction of Concorde, the world's first supersonic aircraft.

The Little History of Swansea

The Little History of Swansea

Author: David Gwynn Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/09/2020

This small book details the full history of Swansea in an engaging and accessible way. Here we will trace the growth of the medieval town, the rise of the Port of Swansea, the industrial heritage of the area and the fate that befell the town during the Second World War. Much has changed over the years, and it is the aim of this book to present those changes in a coherent and yet engaging manner. History can be fun, and this book will bring out the odd and unusual in Swansea's past whilst chronicling the development of the city. it will be of interest to locals and the many visitors that wish to know more about the area's history.

Sunderland at War 1939-45

Sunderland at War 1939-45

Author: Craig Armstrong Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/08/2020

Sunderland was a key shipbuilding and repair facility with a long history of providing vessels for the British Merchant Navy. As well as its shipbuilding industry, the town also possessed other important industries such as paint manufacturing and extensive industries connected with shipbuilding and coal mining. The port town, on the banks of the strategically important River Wear, was also a main hub, along with its northerly neighbour the River Tyne, for coal exports, with much of the coal produced in the huge Durham coalfield being dispatched south via the Wear. All of this meant that the town found itself on the front lines of the war effort and marked it as a prime target for the Luftwaffe. The town experienced several heavy air raids, including one which caused a great deal of damage to both housing and key industries, as well as resulting in serious casualties to the civilian population. The considerable disruption and dislocation caused meant that the authorities struggled to provide adequate shelters and to fill the gaps within what were to become vital Air Raid Precautions services. When the bombing came, these volunteers were to make a vital contribution. Sunderland also had a proud tradition of military service and many of her men and women volunteered for service in the armed forces, with many paying the ultimate price in defence of freedom. A large number of Sunderland men served in the Merchant Navy, while the Royal Navy also boasted many Wearsiders. The local Army regiment, the famed Durham Light Infantry, also boasted many Wearsiders and the regiment saw action in almost every theatre of the war. For other Wearsiders, the attraction of flight drew them to service in the ranks of the RAF, for some, service in Bomber Command was motivated by a thirst for vengeance after witnessing the bombing of their home town.

A Place for Inquiry, A Place for Wonder

A Place for Inquiry, A Place for Wonder

Author: William Robbins, Jane Lubchenco Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/08/2020

The H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest is a slice of classic Oregon: due east of Eugene in the Cascade Mountains, the Andrews Forest comprises almost 16,000 acres of the Lookout Creek watershed. The landscape is steep, with hills and deep valleys and cold, fast-running streams. The densely forested landscape includes cedar, hemlock, and moss-draped ancient Douglas fir trees. One of eighty-one USDA experimental forests, the Andrews is administered cooperatively by USFS, OSU, and the Willamette National Forest. While many Oregonians may think of the Andrews simply as a good place for a hike, research conducted there has profoundly reshaped Forest Service management policies and contributed to our understanding of healthy forests. In A Place for Inquiry, A Place for Wonder, William Robbins turns his attention to the long-overlooked Andrews Forest and argues for its importance to environmental science and policy. From its founding in 1948, the experimental forest has been the site of wide-ranging research. Beginning with postwar studies on the conversion of old-growth timber to fast-growing young stands, research at the Andrews shifted in the next few decades to long-term ecosystem investigations that focus on climate, streamflow, water quality, vegetation succession, biogeochemical cycling, and effects of forest management. The Andrews has thus been at the center of a dramatic shift in federal timber practices from industrial, intensive forest management policies to strategies emphasizing biodiversity and healthy ecosystems.

20 Football Towns

20 Football Towns

Author: Steve Leach Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 20/08/2020

In today's glitzy world of global superstar footballers with lavish lifestyles, glamorous WAGs and celebrity status, it's easy to forget the grassroots of a sport where loyalty to a hometown club can still be rock solid - and counts for everything. Place matters. The town where we grew up and all the places we've lived form reference points in our lives, bringing with them a potent mix of associations. For a football fan, memories of seeing the local team play live are inextricably intertwined with place; particular matches with key events in our lives. Despite the dilution of local communities brought about by the decline of traditional industries and the dispersal of defunct housing estates, football fandom can still pull us together. Why is this? What is the special magic that holds the tribe together? Steve Leach profiles clubs in twenty towns he's lived in, or visited regularly, identifying the special magic of each team and club.

Real Gwynedd

Real Gwynedd

Author: Rhys Mwyn Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 17/08/2020

Celebrating Gateshead

Celebrating Gateshead

Author: Sandra Brack, Margaret Hall, Anthea Lang, John Grundy Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/08/2020

Gateshead, on the southern bank of the River Tyne, has a rich heritage and distinctive identity. It is a vibrant cultural centre in the north-east of England, home of Sage Gateshead, the Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art and the Angel of the North. During the Industrial Revolution the town was renowned for its shipbuilding and ironworking industries, fed by nearby collieries, and it also pioneered the development of wire rope and the electric light bulb. Celebrating Gateshead chronicles the proud heritage of Gateshead, its important moments and what draws so many to this vibrant town today, from inventions to industry, landmarks to leisure, and newsworthy events to notable achievements. New buildings and structures such as the award-winning Millennium Bridge, arts centres and quayside have won awards, and other historic areas regenerated for the twenty-first century. Within the fields of industry, sport, philanthropy, art, music and literature many Gateshead people have made an impressive contribution. The authors look back on the royal visits to the town, significant anniversaries and local traditions, and special events such as the National Garden Festival in 1990. Illustrated throughout, this fascinating book offers a marvellous insight into Gateshead's rich heritage, its special events and important moments, and will be a valuable contribution to the history of the town and provide a source of many memories to those who have known it well over the years.

Banbridge

Banbridge

Author: Doreen McBride Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 03/08/2020

Travel along the Lower Bann from Ballievey, an iconic location for the Game of Thrones, and discover ancient Celtic sites, old linen mills, the remains of a factory that developed an aeroplane used for reconnaissance during the Second World War, and where the Americans military practised D-Day Landings. You'll also find memories of Ernest Walton, educated in Banbridge and the first person to see an artificially split atom; F.E. McWilliam, the renowned sculpturer; and Captain Francis Crozier, who discovered the North West Passage. Banbridge town gets its name from the 'new' bridge crossing the river. It contains the church once attended by Joseph Scriven, author of 'What a Friend We Have in Jesus'; the site of one of St Patrick's first churches; fine Georgian buildings and Europe's first flyover bridge.

Wokingham

Wokingham

Author: Richard Gibbs Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 03/08/2020

Wokingham sits on the edge of Windsor Great Forest. Originally settled by the Wocingas, an Anglo-Saxon tribe, the town grew steadily - but its early prosperity was cut short when half of the houses were destroyed during the English Civil War. Wokingham has hosted bull-baiting, highwaymen and a multitude of beer houses. The town's people have played their part in both world wars. Its rich history is interwoven with the history of England: a story of good times and bad, from the Beaker people to the Victorians to the present day. Wokingham is the quintessential English county town.