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Local history

See below for a selection of the latest books from Local history category. Presented with a red border are the Local history books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Local history books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

The Little History of Devon

The Little History of Devon

Author: Suze Gardner Format: Hardback Release Date: 04/01/2021

There is nothing little about the history of Devon! However, this book condenses the full and fascinating history of the county into one volume. Arranged in brief sections in chronological order, this can be read from cover to cover or dipped into at leisure. Informative yet accessible, this is a wholly readable account for anyone who wants to know more about the history of Devon.

A Georgetown Life

A Georgetown Life

Author: Grant Quertermous Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/12/2020

An invaluable primary resource for understanding nineteenth-century America. As a Georgetown resident for nearly a century, Britannia Wellington Peter Kennon (1815 - 1911) was close to the key political events of her time. Born into the prominent Peter family, Kennon came into contact with the many notable historical figures of the day who often visited Tudor Place, her home for over ninety years. Now published for the first time, the record of her experiences offers a unique insight into nineteenth-century American history. Housed in the Tudor Place archives, The Reminiscences of Britannia Wellington Peter Kennon is a collection of Kennon's memories solicited and recorded by her grandchildren in the 1890s. The text includes Kennon's recollections of her mother Martha Custis Peter and spending time at Mount Vernon with her grandparents George and Martha Washington. She also recounts her childhood in Georgetown, life during the Civil War, the people enslaved at Tudor Place, and daily life in Washington, DC. Readers will also find it an essential companion to the incredible collection of objects preserved at Tudor Place. Edited by Grant Quertermous, this richly illustrated and annotated edition gives readers a greater appreciation of life in early Georgetown. It includes a guide to the city's streets then and now, a detailed family tree, and an appendix of the many people Britannia encountered-a who's who of the period. Notable for both its breadth and level of detail, A Georgetown Life brings a new dimension to the study of nineteenth-century America.

Somerset: A Troubled Century

Somerset: A Troubled Century

Author: Allan Bunyan Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/11/2020

Rather than a chronology of events this volume looks at the lives, morals and beliefs of people and how they were affected by events that were largely out of their control. Rather than re hash the old stories about the main characters, there are portraits of the forgotten figures from that era, both heroes and villains. People like Peter Easton one of the most successful pirates of that or any other age, Lawrence Chislett, the unsung hero of the first siege of Taunton. John Sheppard, the renegade royalist who had to return to the small settlement of Kilton, in post-Civil war Somerset, and live among those whose lives he had made a misery Otherwise unremarkable people are featured, like Thomas Sesse, whose act of Christian charity spectacularly back fired on him. Then there was the mass hysteria at the discovery of a Hellish knot of witches , in Eat Somerset in the 1660's Eye witness accounts are used throughout from a wealth of original documents to try and recreate the sounds sights and experience of not only a county, and a country in a state of turmoil.

Women in Wartime

Women in Wartime

Author: Clive Hardy, Alice Rose Format: Hardback Release Date: 28/11/2020

Looking back, it is hard to believe that when war was declared in September 1939, Britain's women were effectively told to stick to women's work. War was men's business. As the war entered its sixth year, it had long ceased to be men's business. Around 770,000 women were working in engineering and vehicle construction. 640,000 were serving in the armed forces. 260,000 were working in munitions and tens of thousands more were working on the railways, or on the land, or with the post office, or in Civil Defence. Some were pilots ferrying new aircraft from manufacturers to RAF squadrons; others worked on code breaking at Bletchley Park, and a very brave few were secret agents operating behind enemy lines. The photographs in this book have been sourced from the combined archives of Reach plc including: The Daily Mirror, Daily Record, Manchester Evening News, Newcastle Chronicle & Journal, Birmingham Post & Mail, Derby Evening Telegraph and many more to illustrate the roles Britain's women played during the greatest conflict the world has ever witnessed.

Real Cambridge

Real Cambridge

Author: Grahame Davies Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 16/11/2020

Real Gwynedd

Real Gwynedd

Author: Rhys Mwyn Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 16/11/2020

Greenwich at Work

Greenwich at Work

Author: David C. Ramzan Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/11/2020

The history of Greenwich in South East London is defined by its location on the Southbank of the River Thames and its proximity to central London. Since its foundation, the people of Greenwich have worked in maritime industries and served the great metropolis, as well as everyday occupations and trades in the town. Greenwich Palace was the home of the Tudor monarchs, later becoming the Royal Naval Hospital then the Royal Naval College, and at the other end of the social scale the Greenwich peninsula has been home to many of those who worked in London's industries and in the docks nearby, accessible through the foot tunnel under the river. Greenwich Power Station was built to power London's trams and underground railways and today the old industrial area of North and East Greenwich is home to the O2 Arena and the Millennium Village built on the site of a submarine cable manufacturer. The centre of Greenwich is today a mixture of old and new, the centuries-old market continuing to attract many new visitors. Greenwich at Work explores the working life of this South East London town and its people, and the industries that have characterised it. The book will appeal to all those with an interest in the history of Greenwich.

Wakefield at Work

Wakefield at Work

Author: Paul L. Dawson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/11/2020

Wakefield was a prosperous market town in the Middle Ages, but it was transformed by coal mining during the Industrial Revolution. Mining dominated the local economy until the last pits closed in the 1970s and 1980s. Trade in cloth and cloth finishing were also cornerstones of Wakefield's economy, drawing in merchants from across the north. Local families - the Milnes's and the Naylors - dominated the trade until the economic depression of the 1820s and increasing mechanisation. Cloth production started on a small scale and many houses in the area had a weaving shed until the arrival of the first steam-powered mill in 1781 and the rapid expansion of fulling and scribbling mills in Wakefield. Yarn spinning was more successful, and the huge Plumpton Park complex on Westgate became the largest employer in the town. Heavy industry also came to Wakefield. Steam engines were constructed at Fall Ing Foundry from 1791 and the railways became a major employer. Greens Economiser Works were a major concern until the 1960s. The city has been transformed once more, with the major employers today being warehouse distribution bases, retail parks and shopping outlets. Wakefield at Work explores the working life of this Yorkshire city and its people, and the industries that have characterised it. The book will appeal to all those with an interest in the history of Wakefield.

A-Z of Bungay

A-Z of Bungay

Author: Christopher Reeve Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/11/2020

The medieval Suffolk market town of Bungay on the River Waveney was dominated by its castle, owned by the Bigod family, the Earls of Norfolk, and its Benedictine priory. The town prospered through its river trade and other local industries and was also known for the mysterious attack by the hellhound Black Shuck on the church congregation during a thunderstorm in 1577. The black dog was subsequently incorporated in the town's coat of arms. Although much of the town was destroyed in the fire of 1688, it was soon rebuilt and became fashionable in the eighteenth century, earning the nickname of 'Little London', and further changes came to Victorian Bungay with the growth of the printing industry in the town, which developed into the well-known R. Clay & Sons. Although the town suffered during the agricultural decline and loss of other industries in the early twentieth century, it is now a thriving centre for new shops and businesses in the area. In A-Z of Bungay author Christopher Reeve delves into the history of the town. He highlights well-known landmarks and famous residents, and also digs beneath the surface to uncover some of the lesser-known facts about Bungay and its hidden places of interest. This fascinating A-Z tour of Bungay's history is fully illustrated with photography and will appeal to all those with an interest in this Suffolk town.

Evesham at Work

Evesham at Work

Author: Stan Brotherton Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/11/2020

The picturesque market town of Evesham in Worcestershire grew up around its large medieval abbey, situated on a bend on the River Avon. The abbey brought trade and business to the town but after the Dissolution of the Monasteries in Henry VIII's reign the town continued to be a prosperous market town for the area. The fertile land around Evesham was ideal for the growing of fruit and vegetables and the Vale of Evesham is still known today for market gardening. In this book local historian Stan Brotherton explores the working life of Evesham and its people, and the industries that have characterised it over the years, from life under the abbots, its role as the granary of Worcestershire, new charters and new guilds, to the importance of the arrival of the railways in the growth of the fruit and vegetable industry, the developments of unions and co-operatives, the impact of the world wars on working lives and present-day industries of horticulture and heritage. Evesham at Work will appeal to all those with an interest in the history of this Worcestershire town.

Wallasey History Tour

Wallasey History Tour

Author: Ian Collard Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/11/2020

Wallasey History Tour offers a fascinating glimpse into the past of this town on the Wirral Peninsula. Local author Ian Collard guides readers around its streets and buildings, showing how its famous landmarks used to look and how they have changed across the centuries, as well as exploring some of its lesser-known sights and hidden corners. This pocket-sized guide reveals how the town has altered and highlights the way of life for past generations. With the help of a handy location map, readers are invited to discover for themselves the changing face of Wallasey.

Lost Villages of Sussex

Lost Villages of Sussex

Author: Alex Vincent Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/11/2020

Throughout England there are thousands of lost or deserted villages. Most were abandoned after the Black Death or other plague epidemics, but some were lost to coastal erosion or the encroaching sea, while others were resettled elsewhere when the livelihood upon which the village relied disappeared and some were even deliberately moved in later centuries on the whim of country house owners. In this book author Alex Vincent surveys the lost villages of Sussex. By examining old records and maps, the history of excavations in the area, local archaeological archives and records and the evidence of remaining buildings, ruins and old earthworks, he has recorded over 140 deserted, shrunken and shifted villages in East and West Sussex. He explores what remains on these sites currently, including their churches, which often stand alone today; now isolated farmhouses; ruins; fragments in later buildings and the sites of old houses and streets that are often just bumps in a field; pest houses and mass graves of plague victims; the importance of place names as a record of previous inhabitation; lost industries; and many more markers of a vanished world. This fascinating picture of an important but often forgotten part of the history of Sussex over the centuries will be of interest to all those who live in this corner of south-east England or have known it well.