LoveReading

Becoming a member of the LoveReading community is free.

No catches, no fine print just unadulterated book loving, with your favourite books saved to your own digital bookshelf.

New members get entered into our monthly draw to win £100 to spend in your local bookshop Plus lots lots more…

Find out more

Narrowboats & canals

See below for a selection of the latest books from Narrowboats & canals category. Presented with a red border are the Narrowboats & canals books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Narrowboats & canals books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

The Cromford Canal

The Cromford Canal

Author: Hugh Potter Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/09/2009

The Cromford Canal was a bold undertaking, linking the Derwent and Upper Erewash valleys to the main canal system of England. Collieries, ironworks, mills, limestone and gritstone quarries all flourished alongside it. Although penetrating the southern part of the Peak District, William Jessop's engineering genius ensured that the canal passed thirteen miles through this hilly terrain without a single lock. As a result there is some spectacular scenery in the upper reaches as it contours along the steep side of the Derwent valley. Today, the historical importance of the Cromford Canal has been recognised by the inclusion of its top section in the UNESCO Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site - the only canal in the UK to gain such an accolade.

Stroudwater and Thames & Severn Canals

Stroudwater and Thames & Severn Canals

Author: Michael Handford, David Viner Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 21/09/2009

The Cotswolds are one of the most attractive and visited areas in England. The main canals in the region, the Stroudwater and Thames & Severn Canals, cross the Cotswolds from east to west and penetrate some of the most picturesque areas like the Golden Valley and Chalford. Built between 1775 and 1789, the two canals are thirty-seven miles long with fifty-seven locks. Their most interesting features include the impressive groups of locks climbing steeply from Stroud and the famous Sapperton Tunnel, about two and a quarter miles long - the third longest canal tunnel ever built in England. This walking guide, revised for its new edition, takes its readers along the towpath pointing out the main features and giving points of access and public rights of way. Clear, detailed maps show the route, and historical photographs illustrate features along the towpath and show the canal and those who lived and worked upon it.

Canal Fever

Canal Fever

Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/09/2009

This book contains original essays on the past, present, and future of the Ohio and Erie Canal. Combining original essays based on the past, present, and future of the Ohio & Erie Canal, Canal Fever showcases the research and writing of the best and most knowledgeable canal historians, archaeologists, and enthusiasts. Each contributor brings his or her expertise to tell the canal's story in three parts: the canal era - the creation of the canal and its importance to Ohio's early growth; the canal's decline - the decades when the canal was merely a ditch and path in backyards all over northeast Ohio; and finally the rediscovery of this old transportation system and its transformation into a popular recreational resource, the Ohio & Erie Canalway. Included are many voices from the past, such as canalers, travelers, and immigrants, stories of canal use through various periods, and current interviews with many individuals involved in the recent revitalization of the canal. Accompanying the essays are a varied and interesting selection of photographs of sites, events, and people, as well as original maps and drawings by artist Chuck Ayers. Canal Fever takes a broad approach to the canal and what it has meant to Ohio from its original function in the state's growth its present-day function in revitalizing our region. Canal buffs, historians, educators, engineers, and those interested in urban revitalization will appreciate its extensive use of primary source materials and will welcome this comprehensive collection.

A Canal People

A Canal People

Author: Sonia Rolt Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/06/2009

During a few years in the late 1940s and early 1950s Robert Longden took a remarkable set of photographs of the narrow boat community at Hawkesbury Stop - the main meeting point for those who worked the Midlands canals. The images are of a close community and represent its members in a very intimate way, at work, at play, in their domestic affairs, and as they lived on the paired and single colourful narrow boats. They illustrate the close relationship between all ages and types within the community, and the dramatic boat shapes and infrascape of this rural and industrial area. Sonia Rolt, who herself worked the canals during the period and knew the photographer, provides an introduction, which details how Robert Longden came to this passionate involvement. It also sets the photographs in the context of their time, the last period when the narrow boats could be said to play a serious part in transporting goods in quantity. Informative captions identify the scenes before you. Providing a rare insight into the community who worked the waterways when it was still a way of life for many, this book will appeal not only to canal enthusiasts, but to anyone interesting in Britain's social and industrial heritage.

The Canals of England

The Canals of England

Author: Eric De Mare Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/04/2009

The Canals Of England first appeared in a special edition of the 'Architectural Review' in August 1949. Now 60 years later Eric De Mare's book continues to provide an incredible insight into the architecture and function of England's canals, through its exploration of the functional tradition of canal side buildings, bridges and bollards. The Canals of England explains how canals are made and how they work by exploring the past, present and future of our waterways. The text is supported by old prints from the author's collection and a set of photographs. Each picture reveals how many architectural and scenic treasures our canals possess, bringing the text to life. The book is clearly organised with each new chapter providing a detailed insight into different aspects of our canals. Topics covered include 'How Canals Work', 'Two Hundred Years of Canals' and 'Have the Canals a Future?' The Canals of England provides an engaging and interesting read for anyone who wants to learn more about the architectural history, and functionality, of England's canals.

The Thames and Severn Canal

The Thames and Severn Canal

Author: Humphrey Household Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/03/2009

The canal was completed in 1789 at a cost of GBP250,000. With the Stroudwater Navigation, which had been completed in 1779, it completed a link between the River Severn and the Gloucester and Sharpness Canal in the west and the River Thames in the east. Both the Stroudwater Navigation and Thames and Severn Canal are 'broad canals'. This means that boats with a 14 foot beam could use them. The Thames and Severn Canal was just under 28A miles long and had 44 locks. The branch to Cirencester added a further 1A miles. The canal's summit is 363 feet above sea level and includes the 2.1 mile long Sapperton tunnel. At the time of its completion, this tunnel was the longest in England. The canal always had problems with its water supply due to springs breaking through the clay lining of the canal bed. In summer when the springs receded, water was lost through these holes at a rate greater than the available supply. In one of the attempts to rectify this problem, the size of the locks was reduced which resulted in their unusual double headed appearance. In a further attempt to prevent water loss, King's Reach, the section immediately east of Sapperton tunnel, the canal was lined with concrete rather than puddle clay. In 1819 another canal company, the North Wilts Canal, completed a link between the Wilts and Berks Canal at Swindon and the Thames and Severn Canal at Latton. As the 19th century progressed, railway competition took much traffic from the canals. The Thames and Severn Canal was in economic difficulties by the 1890's. Much of the canal, including Sapperton Tunnel, was abandoned in 1927. A western section survived in use until 1933, and the Stroudwater Navigation was not abandoned until 1941.

There and Back Again

There and Back Again

Author: Simon Stoker Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/12/2008

The Cromford Canal ran 14.5 miles (23 km) from Cromford to the Erewash Canal in Derbyshire, England with a branch to Pinxton. Built by William Jessop with the assistance of Benjamin Outram, its alignment included four tunnels and 14 locks. From Cromford it ran south following the 300-foot (91 m) contour line along the east side of the valley of the Derwent to Ambergate, where it turned eastwards along the Amber valley. It turned sharply to cross the valley, crossing the river and the Ambergate to Nottingham road, by means of an aqueduct at Bullbridge, before turning towards Ripley. From there the Butterley Tunnel took it through to the Erewash Valley. From the tunnel it continued to Pye Hill, near Ironville, the junction for the branch to Pinxton, and then descended through fourteen locks to meet the Erewash Canal at Langley Mill. The Pinxton Branch became important as a route for Nottinghamshire coal, via the Erewash, to the River Trent and Leicester and was a terminus of the Mansfield and Pinxton Railway. In 1889, subsidence closed the Butterley Tunnel for four years, and further subsidence in 1900 closed the Tunnel permanently. Most of the canal was abandoned in 1944 with the exception of a half-mile stretch to Langley Mill which was abandoned in 1962. The Bullbridge Aqueduct was removed in 1968 when the Ripley road was widened. In 1985 the Codnor Park Reservoir was lowered by 6 feet (1.8 m) and a lock was removed as part of a flood prevention scheme. After closure, the canal was taken over by the British Waterways Board and sold to the Derbyshire County Council in 1974. Attempts are being made to restore the canal and about 5 miles of it remains in water. The towpath from Ambergate to Cromford is now a very popular walking route, with the Derwent Valley Line adjacent, Leawood Pumping House and the High Peak Junction of the Cromford and High Peak Railway.

British Canals

British Canals

Author: Joseph Boughey, Charles Hadfield Format: Hardback Release Date: 25/03/2008

The first edition of British Canals was published in 1950 and was much admired as a pioneering work in transport history. Joseph Boughey, with the advice of Charles Hadfield, has previously revised and updated the perennially popular material to reflect more recent changes. For this ninth edition, Joseph Boughey discusses the many new discoveries and advances in the world of canals around Britain, inevitably focusing on the twentieth century to a far greater extent than in any previous edition of this book, while still within the context of Hadfield's original work.

Arun Navigation

Arun Navigation

Author: Paul Vine Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/11/2007

No one knows when the first sail was raised to propel a boat on the River Mersey, but much speculation abounds. Theoretically, sailing ships could have used this stretch of water in as far back as pre-Roman times, but the oldest proven vessel was that of the Middle Ages. In this volume, Michael Stammers tells the history of the many Liverpool sailing ships from 1565, the year of the first list of Liverpool Shops - there were twelve, ranging from the bark Eagle, of 40 tons to the boat Good Luck of 6 tons - through the age of slavery and into the 1930s. Even after the advent of stream propulsion, sail still ruled in many parts of the world and Liverpool was no exception. Four-masted barques such as Olivebank and Celtic Glen were a common view in the dock system and were a stunning sight to behold.

Houseboats: Aquatic Architecture of Sausalito

Houseboats: Aquatic Architecture of Sausalito

Author: Kathy Shaffer Format: Hardback Release Date: 02/07/2007

Prepare to be wowed, amused, and inspired as you visit over 100 houseboats, inside and out. Architect Kathy Shaffer follows her bliss and explores the floating legacy of her Sausalito home. With an eye toward the artistic, Shaffer carefully documents the architectural evolution of this houseboat community. Learn the geography of the area, the developers who helped shape it, the history of the marinas, and the amazing evolution of houseboat design and construction. This book also reflects the lives of people who choose to constrain their home to a hundred square feet or so, and how they've engineered their surroundings to their spatial restrictions. This book is a celebration of the refreshing, inspiring forms created in the free-thinking spirit of houseboat architecture. It is a must-have for all who love architecture, handmade houses, and inspiring homes.

Britain's Canals

Britain's Canals

Author: Nick Corble Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/06/2007

This informative volume looks at broad and narrow, the canal network, different users, types of boats and barges, decorations, things you should know when buying a boat, basic navigation, living on board and the surrounding flora and fauna. Complemented with a brief history, the guide also considers the transformation of canals from work to leisure, restoration and the canal today. Including various 'top tens', i.e. waterside walks, dos and don'ts of boating, circular routes, museums, restoration schemes, spectacular lock flights, longest tunnels and canal personalities, this illustrated guide is an invaluable first-stop reference book.

Rivers Revealed

Rivers Revealed

Author: Jerry M. Hay Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/05/2007

Written in an engaging, conversational style, Rivers Revealed combines the author's lifelong love of America's waterways with practical and historic information gathered from his three decades as a professional riverlorian for the Delta Queen Steamboat Company in New Orleans. A modern-day Huck Finn, Jerry Hay spins yarns laced with personal anecdotes on such topics as navigating 500 miles of the Wabash River, the trials and tribulations of building a sternwheeler, reading the river, how to plan your own river adventure, a hair-raising but humorous river rescue, an unforgettable goose named Gilligan, the language of the rivers and riverboats, early to present-day river navigation, and much, much more. A book for all who love Mark Twain, these river adventures will entertain the landlubber and engage the boating enthusiast.