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Trains & railways: general interest

See below for a selection of the latest books from Trains & railways: general interest category. Presented with a red border are the Trains & railways: general interest books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Trains & railways: general interest books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Scottish Steam 1948-67

Scottish Steam 1948-67

Author: Brian J. Dickson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 25/08/2019

At the nationalisation of Britian's railways in 1948, the Scottish Region inherited 1,400 locomotives which had been constructed by the pre-grouping companies. The real veterans among these were a handful of ex-NBR and CR 0-6-0 tender locos dating from the 1880s. From the 1890s were a large number of 0-4-4s and 4-4-0s from the same sources. The rarest survivors were the ex-HR 4-4-0 `Loch' and `Small Ben' classes, totalling fewer than 10 examples that were allocated to the sheds in the far north of Scotland. From the late 1940s and '50s enthusiasts from England would make the long journey north in what became known as the `Grand Tour' to see these rare classes before they became extinct. Fortunately many of these intrepid souls carried cameras to record the locos and together with their Scottish counterparts were, by the early 1960s, witnessing rows of these veterans at sheds and dumps across Scotland awaiting the scrapyard. This new book is arranged chronologically, covers the whole of Scotland and shows the wide variety of steam power from the early examples mentioned above to more modern classes of the LNER, LMSR and BR Standard in operation. It is a must-have for all steam railway enthusiasts.

The Isle of Wight Railway From 1923 Onwards

The Isle of Wight Railway From 1923 Onwards

Author: R.J. Maycock, R. Silsbury Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 21/08/2019

The Wirksworth Branch

The Wirksworth Branch

Author: Howard Sprenger Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 21/08/2019

The Hayling Island Branch The Hayling Billy

The Hayling Island Branch The Hayling Billy

Author: John Scott-Morgan Format: Hardback Release Date: 19/08/2019

The Hayling Island Branch was one of Britain's most iconic sea side lines, connecting Havant with Hayling Island via Langston Harbour. Opening in 1865 for freight and 1867 to passenger traffic, it was after a few years of local control, managed and operated as part of the London Brighton & South Coast Railway, who were responsible for its upkeep until the railway grouping in 1923, when it became a part of the Southern Railway. The railway had a colourful and bucolic existence, with trains headed by the attractive Stroudley Terrier class tank locomotives and a collection of vintage carriage stock. In 1948 the branch became part of the Southern Region of British Railways, carrying on as a local and at times heavily used branch line, until its closure in November 1963\. Today the lines track bed is a walking path from end to end, with only the former goods shed at Hayling Island to show the visitor any tangible evidence of the railways existence.

The Southern After Steam A Vision in Blue and Grey

The Southern After Steam A Vision in Blue and Grey

Author: Don Benn Format: Hardback Release Date: 19/08/2019

After the end of steam on the Southern in July 1967, the author concentrated primarily on recording the Southern scene, to start with in black and white and then from 1972 in colour. In so doing he built up a huge collection of slides for the period 1972 to 1988 concentrating on the lines close to his Kent home or in the London area but also with some images taken on the Central and Western Division main lines. The book contains more than 260 high quality colour images of second generation rolling stock set out by class of electric or diesel multiple units and locomotives, ranging from 4 SUBs and EPBs through Hastings Diesel units to Class 73 Electro-Diesels, a total of fifteen classes all told. The severe winters of 1985 and 1987 are also included and Departmental stock isn't forgotten. Lovers of the Southern Region in the 1970s and 80s prior to the introduction of replacement stock will find much of interest in this book.

Directory of British Railways New and Reopened Stations 1948-2018

Directory of British Railways New and Reopened Stations 1948-2018

Author: Paul Smith, Sally Salmon Format: Hardback Release Date: 19/08/2019

Folllowing nationalisation in 1948, British railways closed many branch lines and reduced the number of stations on the network. In January 1978, there were 2,358 and by January 2018 there were 2,560 stations on the network. The object of this book is to record those stations that are re-opened or are new stations to the system. The book gives: locations, facilities, chronology, statistics and passenger usage.

The Extraordinary Daddy-Long-Legs Railway of Brighton

The Extraordinary Daddy-Long-Legs Railway of Brighton

Author: Martin Easdown Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/08/2019

The unique, but sadly short-lived, Brighton & Rottingdean Seashore Electric Railway must have presented quite an amazing spectacle, even during those late Victorian days of engineering excellence. Affectionately known as the `Daddy-Long-Legs', `spider car' or `sea car', the railway resembled a piece of seaside pier that had broken away and was moving by itself through the sea. Although closed over a hundred years ago, interest in the Daddy-Long-Legs Railway remains strong and it has become a Brighton icon. The book details the history of the Daddy-Long-Legs and features the best collection of photographs of it so far assembled, along with plans, timetables and posters and associated features such as Volk's Electric Railway and the piers assembled as a landing stage for the Daddy-Long-Legs. This will be the first book to concentrate solely on this unique and fascinating piece of British seaside history.

BNSF Railway

BNSF Railway

Author: Richard Billingsley Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/08/2019

With tracks and trackage rights that cover more than half of the states in the union, the Burlington Northern & Santa Fe is one of the true giants not just of the United States, but of the entire global rail scene. From the vast mileages of the Trans-Con routes through the deserts to the dense networks of the great cities, the BNSF Railway's 8,000 orange locomotives are an everyday part of life for much of America. With multiple locomotives pulling mile-and-a-half-long freight trains, not to mention the odd venture onto passenger trains, the variety of workings and traffic will capture the interest of rail fans the world over. Seen through the lens of a UK-based photographer, this book shows not just the motive power but also the loads, the places they go to and the places they pass through.

First Generation Scottish DMUs

First Generation Scottish DMUs

Author: Colin J. Howat Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/08/2019

From the mid-1950s diesel multiple units began to appear in Scotland, firstly on the main line between Edinburgh and Glasgow Queen Street and later on many secondary lines. More DMU units began to appear from the early 1960s with the gradual withdrawal of steam locomotives. Possibly the ultimate in the DMU development was the InterCity DMU, later numbered as Class 126. With the expanding motorway network, many branch lines could not be saved and the Beeching axe fell on many of them. The first generation of Scottish DMU fleets never established the huge following and interest that the diesel and electric locos did. Here, Colin J. Howat covers virtually the whole of Scotland and encompasses locations from Arbroath in the north to just south of the border in Carlisle. This book covers diesel multiple units from Metro-Cammell Class 101s up to and including Swindon InterCity Class 126s.

Green Diesel Days

Green Diesel Days

Author: Derek Huntriss Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/08/2019

The 1955 Railway Modernisation Plan provided for the introduction of 2,500 new diesel locomotives, with initial orders for 171 examples, to replace steam locomotives on Britain's railways. The Modernisation Plan was the death knell for steam traction, arguing that dieselisation should take place as quickly as the new locomotives could be built. In 1956, for the first time, more diesel locomotives were built than steam. However, several of the Pilot Scheme orders were for batches of ten or twenty machines, without a prototype, a decision that BR would later come to regret. Maintenance and reliability would be problems for these early diesel locomotives. Most coaching stock in use in the late 1950s did not allow for electrical train heating, so boilers had to be fitted to the locomotives to heat the carriages, which in turn caused weight problems. This book takes a look, in full colour, at the green diesel days on Britain's railways as steam was being phased out.

South Wales Railways Around the Millennium

South Wales Railways Around the Millennium

Author: Paul Woollard Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/08/2019

By the early years of the twentieth century, the development of rail transport in South Wales had produced an intricate network that owed its origins to several factors that came into play in the previous century, such as the demand for iron ore, limestone and high-quality Welsh anthracite coal, as well as the nineteenth-century expansion and development of rail-served Welsh Bristol Channel ports. By the 1990s, the inexorable decline of the railway network in South Wales, steepened by the devastating Miners' Strike of 1984/85, meant that railborne freight was a shadow of its former self. What remained however, certainly in the 1990s and early 2000s, was a variety of flows in the hands of what we would now refer to as classic traction - namely Class 56s, 60s and, of course, the venerable Class 37s. This book draws on a collection of images, mainly of the aforementioned types, often in colourful sector liveries, set in the striking rural and industrial landscapes that typify South Wales. Locomotive-hauled passenger services also added visual variety to this part of the country in the period covered by this book.

The 1896 Light Railways Act The Law That Made Heritage Railways Possible

The 1896 Light Railways Act The Law That Made Heritage Railways Possible

Author: John Hannavy Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/08/2019

`In no other country in the world is there anything to match Britain's love affair with the steam train; nowhere else are there so many preserved railways keeping the magic of steam alive.' In 1896, the Light Railways Act was designed to speed up the official procedures for gaining approval to construct a railway line. Originally intended to lapse in 1901, it was extended instead, and somehow stayed on the statute books long after its use had ceased. In the 1960s, groups of steam railway enthusiasts recognised it as a possible means of gaining approval to reopen stretches of railway lines that had been closed by Dr Beeching, keeping the steam dream alive. More than half a century later, some of these restored lines have already celebrated their golden jubilees, and their popularity continues to grow. Thanks to the unintended consequence of that 1896 Act, each new generation since Beeching has had - and will continue to have - the opportunity to enjoy the magic of steam trains. Along with a wealth of evocative images, John Hannavy explores the fascinating story behind a Victorian law with a welcome and unexpected side effect - leading to today's popular heritage railway industry.