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Trains & railways: general interest

See below for a selection of the latest books from Trains & railways: general interest category. Presented with a red border are the Trains & railways: general interest books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Trains & railways: general interest books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Rail Freight in Devon and Cornwall

Rail Freight in Devon and Cornwall

Author: David Mitchell Format: Hardback Release Date: 24/10/2019

The way it was - an Historical perspective; traffic connected to an agriculture based economy, including a look at broccoli traffic etc. Supporting photos mainly steam from the 1950s (more b&w but some colour). - Milk traffic. A brief history with a more detailed (mainly pictorial) look at individual dairies from 1960s through to the end in 1981. Locations including Torrington, Lapford, Hemyock, Seaton Jn, Chard Jn, Totnes and Lostwithiel. A little steam, more diesel hydraulic and ending with diesel electric classes (mix of b&w and colour, weighted towards the former.) - China Clay. Probably the largest section of the book, perhaps 20%+. A bit of history with a few steam photos, but also a more detailed pictorial look at those loading points active from the 1970s to the present such as Burngullow and the Parkandillack branch, Par Harbour, Goonbarrow Jn, Fowey docks, Wenford, Moorswater and Plymouth. Views inclg related buildings, wagons etc (mainly colour). - Ball clay; Meeth and Heathfield branches - mainly 1970s to the end in early 2000's. - Grain and Fertiliser traffic; a short section, mainly on the Truro, Plymouth & Lapford service in the 1990s. - Coal.A general look, but majoring on Exmouth Jn Coal concentration depot (1967-92). Also 1990s flows for Plymstock cement works and Falmouth Docks. - Oil. Traffic flows to Exeter, Heathfield, Plymouth and Hayle Wharves etc (1970s to the end in 2012). - MOD. A shortish section, dealing with traffic to local bases, including nuclear from Devonport Dockyard. (1970s on). - Scrap Metal - from Plymouth, Exeter and St Blazey. (1970s on). - Cement. A brief look back to the 1960s-70s; Exeter Central, Plymouth and Chacewater in the 1980s; also the more recent Moorswater flow. - Timber. Traffic from Lapford (1980s), Exeter (1990s), Teignbridge & Exeter (present). - Aggregate. ( Mainly Mendip Rail to Exeter from 1990s on). - 'Speedlink', 'Enterprise' etc. Wagonload from 1970s to the end (2000s). Including a look at various locations, including Barnstaple, Whimple (cider), Pinhoe (bricks), Exeter, Plymouth, Cornwall (calcified seaweed) etc. - A short look at a couple of special 'one off' traffics. (1990s) - A section on 'civils' traffic, p.w. work trains. (Length might depend on space available after the above!), and - Railway ballast trains, mainly from Meldon Quarry (a little steam, photos from 1960s to the end). - Weed killers, RHTT and test trains.( Photos under the different sections could include some wagon views. All photos from 1990s on probably in colour; prior to that would be a mix.)

Gresley's V2s

Gresley's V2s

Author: Peter Tuffrey Format: Hardback Release Date: 21/10/2019

Sir Nigel Gresley's V2 Class 2-6-2 locomotive was developed during a period of great success for the London & North Eastern Railway company. The A3 Class and A4 Class Pacifics were breaking records and creating headlines across the globe when the first V2 appeared in 1936. The class was derived from the A3 and inherited many characteristics, such as power, speed and reliability. Employed on both express freight and passenger trains, the V2s soon joined the ranks of their illustrious forebears with both footplatemen and enthusiasts alike. Gresley's V2s documents the vast majority of the 184 locomotives built through evocative colour and black and white images, alongside well-researched captions. The engines appear from introduction in the mid-1930s through the war years and into ownership by British Railways. The photographs capture the V2s at work along the East Coast Main Line and elsewhere, such as the ex-Great Central Railway main line and into Scotland. Engines are seen from the lineside, in stations and on shed. A short section celebrates the only preserved V2, no. 4771 Green Arrow. Whilst the locomotive was operational for a number of years, from the late 2000s no. 4771 has been a static display at the National Railway Museum. There are currently plans to restore the engine at some point in the future, but in the meantime Gresley's V2s serves as reminder of the distinguished service the class provided to both the LNER and BR.

Cromford And High Peak. by Rail and Trail

Cromford And High Peak. by Rail and Trail

Author: Vic Mitchell Format: Hardback Release Date: 19/10/2019

The Pannier Papers 1366, 15XX

The Pannier Papers 1366, 15XX

Author: Ian Sixsmith Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 16/10/2019

The Pannier Papers 54XX, 64XX, 74XX

The Pannier Papers 54XX, 64XX, 74XX

Author: Ian Sixsmith Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 16/10/2019

The Grand Crimean Central Railway

The Grand Crimean Central Railway

Author: Anthony Dawson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/10/2019

The Crimean War, fought by the alliance of Great Britain, France, and the tiny Italian Kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia alongside Turkey against Tsarist Russia, was the first `modern' war, not only for its vast scale (France mobilised a million men) but also the technologies involved, from iron-clad battleships to rifled artillery, the electric telegraph and steam. Best known for the blunder of the Charge of the Light Brigade, the fearful conditions in the trenches at the front, and the quiet heroism of Florence Nightingale, the Crimean War saw the railway go to war for the first time. The Grand Crimean Central Railway was the brainchild of two Victorian railway magnates, Samuel Morton Peto and Thomas Brassey; in order to alleviate the suffering at the front, they volunteered to build at cost a steam railway linking the Allied camps at Sevastopol to their supply base at Balaclava. In the face of much official opposition, the railway was built and operational in a matter of months, supplying hundreds of tons of food, clothing and materiel to the starving and freezing men in their trenches. Largely worked by civilian auxiliaries, the Grand Crimean Central Railway saw the railway transformed into a war-winning weapon, saving countless thousands of lives as it did so.

Industrial Locomotives & Railways of Scotland

Industrial Locomotives & Railways of Scotland

Author: Gordon Edgar Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/10/2019

This is the ninth volume in the ten-part series of regional books examining the industrial railways of England, Scotland and Wales. Like elsewhere in Britain, changes have been far-reaching in industry, and Scotland has certainly suffered considerably in recent decades with the loss of its traditional coal mining, steel and manufacturing industries, especially many of those that were once located around its Central Belt. The diversity of the locomotives and the railways that once served industry in Scotland is a fascinating and neglected subject, and both standard and narrow gauge systems, most of which no longer survive today, are covered within the pages of this book. The author presents an array of striking images, both in colour and black and white, that strive to include some feel for the locations being studied, covering the broad spectrum of industrial railways that once existed in Scotland. These mostly previously unpublished photographs, accompanied by detailed captions, reflect the changing face of Scottish industry over the last six decades or so. As the title suggests, this book is chiefly about Scotland's industrial railways and its locomotives, many actually constructed in Scotland, but this work is also a sad reminder of how much our traditional industries have contracted, or have even been lost entirely over this period, either through globalisation of manufacturing, or the importation of commodities at a cheaper market rate than could have been obtained at home.

The Great Eastern Main Line: London Liverpool Street-Norwich

The Great Eastern Main Line: London Liverpool Street-Norwich

Author: Adam Head Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/10/2019

A major main line under Abellio Greater Anglia's control connecting East Anglia to the capital, the Great Eastern Main Line opened in 1862 and for just under 115 miles passengers are immersed in the sights of Norfolk, Suffolk and Essex before arriving into London. Primarily used by commuters journeying to and from London, the line is also used by leisure travellers, serving numerous seaside resorts, shopping destinations and countryside getaways. In a well-illustrated photographic journey, this book looks in detail at the entirety of this line, from London to Norwich, including all the stations and the variety of locomotives and multiple units that operate in the area.

Maunsell Locomotives

Maunsell Locomotives

Author: Brian Haresnape Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/10/2019

R. E. L. Maunsell's engineering career started in Ireland, where he graduated to the post of Chief Mechanical Engineer of the GSWR. He crossed to England just before the outbreak of the First World War to take up the same post on the SECR, where his first new design, a 2-6-0, was selected as a post-war standard class for Britain's railways (for at that time nationalisation was first seriously canvassed). With this design Maunsell introduced modern concepts to the locomotive practice of railways in the South and South East, and established the pattern of locomotive development for the Southern Railway, to which he was appointed CME at the 1923 Grouping. An enterprising engineer, Maunsell was handicapped by lack of money and severe civil engineering restrictions in his efforts to re-equip the Southern with standard classes of modern locomotive. Nevertheless, he contributed several good-looking and efficient designs to the development of the British steam locomotive, his masterpiece unquestionably being the three-cylinder `School', the country's most powerful and successful 4-4-0 ever.

Internal User Vehicles on Britain's Railways

Internal User Vehicles on Britain's Railways

Author: Royston Morris Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/10/2019

Following on from their use in revenue-earning service, many vehicles (locomotives, carriages and freight wagons) are put to use within the departmental operating fleet, often being rebuilt for a specific purpose. When their use has been deemed no longer necessary for departmental service, many of these vehicles are then put into what is known as the 'Internal User' fleet, where they are used until being either scrapped or sold on to preservationists. These internal user vehicles, once they have been allocated to a works/depot/yard etc, are not permitted to run anywhere on the mainline network and are solely confined to where they have been allocated. Some vehicles are not transferred from the revenue to the departmental fleet, but are simply allocated directly as internal user vehicles. Once at their allocated location, they quite often become static vehicles or even grounded bodies and are used as store sheds, mobile workshops, fuelling tanks, generator vans and numerous other, sometimes one-off, uses. Not all internal user (or IU) vehicles are used by British Railways/Network Rail: many are or were sold for use in industrial settings such as quarries, coal yards and steelworks.

The North Yorkshire Moors Railway in the 1970s The Memoirs of a Heritage Railway Manager

The North Yorkshire Moors Railway in the 1970s The Memoirs of a Heritage Railway Manager

Author: Bernard Warr Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/10/2019

Ever wondered what it was like to run a fledgling heritage railway? Former General Manager of the North Yorkshire Moors Railway Bernard Warr lifts the veil on the ups and downs of running a private railway line in the 1970s. From working as a volunteer to taking on the most senior management role, all the behind the scenes ctivity is here. That the line ran at all was down to the hard work of a few dozen dedicated volunteers, all of whom had views on how it should be done and who were not afraid to come forward and give advice, whether asked for or not! Set among stunning scenery with 18 miles of mostly time-expired track, too few steam engines, one diesel locomotive and a distinctly hit and miss cash-flow situation, the railway was always going to be balanced on a knife-edge. This is a fascinating tale providing a snapshot of the North Yorkshire Moors Railway over a few short years of its early development, now more than forty years ago.