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Trains & railways: general interest

See below for a selection of the latest books from Trains & railways: general interest category. Presented with a red border are the Trains & railways: general interest books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Trains & railways: general interest books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

The Times Golden Years of Rail Travel Britain'S Railways from 1890 to 1980

The Times Golden Years of Rail Travel Britain'S Railways from 1890 to 1980

Author: Julian Holland Format: Hardback Release Date: 03/10/2019

A celebration of the heyday of passenger rail travel around Britain. A time when the sound of steam and locomotive engines were the starting point for many train adventures, holidays and day trips. Written by Britain's leading railway author this publication celebrates an evocative period in Britain's railway history, sadly gone forever but never forgotten. Highly illustrated with photographs and railway memorabilia that have been collected during the authors lifetime interest in the railways. The main period covered is 1900 to 1968 with these subjects being cover; * Important development in the late 19th century * 1900-1914 A multitude of railway companies * 1920-1939 From 1923 the `Big Four' railway companies * 1948-1968 The six regions of British Railways This book will bring back fond memories of an era superseded by electric trains and the motorcar.

West Country Railways

West Country Railways

Author: Peter Grey Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/10/2019

Confessions of A Steam-Age Ferroequinologist Journeys on BR's London Midland Region

Confessions of A Steam-Age Ferroequinologist Journeys on BR's London Midland Region

Author: Keith Widdowson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/10/2019

Having detailed is search for steam-hauled trains elsewhere in Britain, Keith Widdowson turns his attention to their final habitat, the BR London Midland region. From exploratory journeys into the unknown to the dispiriting days of diesel substitutions, he describes the scenario he came across during those final years leading to the end of steam in 1968. His self-imposed mission of riding behind as many iron horses as possible led to many hours of nocturnal travel, extended periods of inactivity in waiting rooms, missed connections and fatigue. This was compensated by great camaraderie with like-minded individuals doing the same. This illustrated book will appeal to all those who witnessed the scene at the time, or who simply long for a bygone age.

Railways Round Dartmoor

Railways Round Dartmoor

Author: Bernard Mills Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/09/2019

Great Northern Railway Gallery

Great Northern Railway Gallery

Author: Vanns, Michael A Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/09/2019

The Great Northern Railway was one of 120 companies that ran trains in Britain during the Victorian and Edwardian period. Formed in 1846, it traded independently for seventy-six years until absorbed into the London & North Eastern Railway on 1 January 1923\. Operating a network of nearly 700 route miles it ran trains between King's Cross, London and York, into the Eastern Counties and the East Midlands, the West Riding of Yorkshire, into Lancashire and even south of the Thames. It developed distinctive characteristics, both in the way it managed its affairs and in the appearance of its trains, stations, signals and signalboxes. Numerous photographs were taken, particularly from the 1890s onwards, by dedicated amateurs attracted to the lineside by the sight of speeding steam locomotives in apple green livery, hauling polished teak carriages. Goods trains and the endless procession of coal trains were not such popular photographic subjects, but by searching out these and images of staff, stations and signalboxes, this book aims to capture something of the spirit of a once-great organisation in the heyday of Britains steam railways.

Railwaymen of the Welsh Valleys 1914-67 Recollections of Pontypool Road Engine Shed, Shunting Yards, Fitting Staff and the Vale of Neath Line

Railwaymen of the Welsh Valleys 1914-67 Recollections of Pontypool Road Engine Shed, Shunting Yards, Fitting Staff and the Vale of Neath Line

Author: Format: Hardback Release Date: 24/09/2019

This book, to published in two parts, is dedicated to the memories of all those people who once worked for the Great Western Railway in South Wales, at Pontypool Road loco depot, the Eastern Valley and the Vale of Neath railway, as well as to those people who worked in the industries once served by the railway in those locations. In 2016, the UK coal mining industry is extinct, and the future of the steel industry is in doubt. This book serves as a reminder to future generations as to what a fantastic place the South Wales valleys once were for heavy industry and transport infrastructure, and also as a tribute to the pioneering 19th century railway builders. Local railway enthusiast Phil Williams, is a contract structural engineer in the aerospace industry. His father's uncle, Harry Miles, was a Swindon trained locomotive fitter at Pontypool Road in the 1930s. His family have interesting links to the mining industry. His great grandfather was Thomas Williams, the Colliery Engineer at Tirpentwys Colliery from before 1902 up to 1912; and then at Crumlin Valley Colliery Hafodrynys and the Glyn Pits, from 1915 until he died in 1925 aged 76.His father's great grandfather, Joseph Harper, was one of the 1890 Llanerch Colliery disaster rescue team; he worked at the British Top Pits. His father's uncle, Williams Harper was the foreman of the wagon shop at the Big Arch Talywain.

London's Underground The Story of the Tube

London's Underground The Story of the Tube

Author: Oliver Green, Benjamin Graham Format: Hardback Release Date: 17/09/2019

It is impossible to imagine London without the Tube: the beating heart of the city, the Underground shuttles over a billion passengers each year below its busy streets and across its leafy suburbs. The distinctive roundel, colour-coded maps and Johnston typeface have become design classics, recognised and imitated worldwide. Opening in 1863, the first sections were operated by steam engines, yet throughout its long history the Tube has been at the forefront of contemporary design, pioneering building techniques, electrical trains and escalators, and business planning. Architects such as Leslie W. Green and Charles Holden developed a distinctively English version of Modernism, and the latest stations for the Jubilee line extension, Overground and Elizabeth line carry this aesthetic forward into the twenty-first century. In this major work published in association with Transport for London, Tube expert Oliver Green traces the history of the Underground, following its troubles and triumphs, its wartime and peacetime work, and the essential part it has played in shaping London's economy, geography, tourism and identity. Specially commissioned photography by Benjamin Graham (UK Landscape Photographer of the Year 2017) brings the story to life in vivid portraits of London Underground's stations, tunnels and trains.

Mallard How the `Blue Streak' Broke the World Speed Record

Mallard How the `Blue Streak' Broke the World Speed Record

Author: Don Hale Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 02/09/2019

The smooth outline of streamlined A4 Pacific locomotive Mallard is instantly recognisable, an icon of railway history resplendent in blue. Famously reaching a top speed of 126mph on 3 July 1938 on the East Coast main line, this world record for steam locomotives still stands today. Don Hale tells the full story of how the record was broken, from the rivalry of the nineteenth-century London-Scotland speed race, to similarities in Mallard's futuristic design to the Bugatti car, and the influence of Germany's nascent Third Reich in propelling the train into an instrument of national prestige. Mallard's designer, Sir Nigel Gresley, is celebrated as one of Britain's most gifted engineers. Updated with new appendices and extra photographs, this classic book remains the perfect tribute to one of British technology's finest hours.

The Hayling Island Branch The Hayling Billy

The Hayling Island Branch The Hayling Billy

Author: John Scott-Morgan Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/08/2019

The Hayling Island Branch was one of Britain's most iconic sea side lines, connecting Havant with Hayling Island via Langston Harbour. Opening in 1865 for freight and 1867 to passenger traffic, it was after a few years of local control, managed and operated as part of the London Brighton & South Coast Railway, who were responsible for its upkeep until the railway grouping in 1923, when it became a part of the Southern Railway. The railway had a colourful and bucolic existence, with trains headed by the attractive Stroudley Terrier class tank locomotives and a collection of vintage carriage stock. In 1948 the branch became part of the Southern Region of British Railways, carrying on as a local and at times heavily used branch line, until its closure in November 1963\. Today the lines track bed is a walking path from end to end, with only the former goods shed at Hayling Island to show the visitor any tangible evidence of the railways existence.

Hills Tramroad: Blaenavon World Heritage Site

Hills Tramroad: Blaenavon World Heritage Site

Author: Chris Barber Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/08/2019

Between 1760 and 1840 a chain of ironworks established along a narrow strip of hill country stretching for 20 miles at the `Heads of the Valleys' in South Wales took advantage of the rich deposits of ironstone, limestone and coal that were the essential raw materials for the ironmaking process. At Blaenavon can be found the best-preserved multi-furnace complex of its type and period in the world. The surrounding landscape is extraordinary; everywhere you look, there is fascinating evidence of human endeavour over the last 200 years. Linking the ironworks to the sources of iron ore, coal and limestone is an intriguing network of primitive railways known as tramroads - they even include the longest tunnel in the world, constructed for horse-drawn operation. Hills Tramroad tells the remarkable story of this magnificent feat of engineering.

The 1896 Light Railways Act The Law That Made Heritage Railways Possible

The 1896 Light Railways Act The Law That Made Heritage Railways Possible

Author: John Hannavy Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/08/2019

This book explores the enduring impact of the 1896 Light Railways Act, which was designed to speed up the official procedures for gaining approval to construct a railway line. Originally intended to lapse in 1901, it was extended instead, and somehow stayed on the statute books long after is use had ceased. In the 1960s, groups of steam railway enthusiasts recognised it as a possible means of gaining approval to reopen stretches of railway lines that had been closed by Dr Beeching, keeping the steam dream alive. More than half a century later, some of these restored lines have already celebrated their golden jubilees, and their popularity continues to grow. Thanks to the unintended consequence of that 1896 Act, each new generation since Beeching has had - and will continue to have - the opportunity to enjoy the magic of steam trains.

South Wales Railways Around the Millennium

South Wales Railways Around the Millennium

Author: Paul Woollard Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/08/2019

By the early years of the twentieth century, the development of rail transport in South Wales had produced an intricate network that owed its origins to several factors that came into play in the previous century, such as the demand for iron ore, limestone and high-quality Welsh anthracite coal, as well as the nineteenth-century expansion and development of rail-served Welsh Bristol Channel ports. By the 1990s, the inexorable decline of the railway network in South Wales, steepened by the devastating Miners' Strike of 1984/85, meant that railborne freight was a shadow of its former self. What remained however, certainly in the 1990s and early 2000s, was a variety of flows in the hands of what we would now refer to as classic traction - namely Class 56s, 60s and, of course, the venerable Class 37s. This book draws on a collection of images, mainly of the aforementioned types, often in colourful sector liveries, set in the striking rural and industrial landscapes that typify South Wales. Locomotive-hauled passenger services also added visual variety to this part of the country in the period covered by this book.