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Trains & railways: general interest

See below for a selection of the latest books from Trains & railways: general interest category. Presented with a red border are the Trains & railways: general interest books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Trains & railways: general interest books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Second Generation Scottish DMUs

Second Generation Scottish DMUs

Author: Colin J. Howat Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/12/2020

Second Generation DMUs in Scotland covers the modern diesel multiple units introduced by BR from 1981. It features locations from across Scotland, and also looks at Carlisle. This book covers units from the experimental Class 140s, introduced in 1981, to contemporary examples including Class 185s still in use with TransPennine Express. Possibly the best unit introduced to Scotland are the Class 156 units based at Corkerhill depot in Glasgow. These units can be found working from Newcastle to Mallaig. The new generation of DMU fleets can go faster and travel further and have generated a huge following. Here, Colin J. Howat combines previously unseen historical black-and-white photography with modern digital examples to tell their story.

East London Railways

East London Railways

Author: Malcolm Batten Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/12/2020

Britain's railways in the early 1970s looked to be in terminal decline. The Beeching cuts of the 1960s had slashed much of the network, but still lines were closing and underinvestment left much of the rest in a sorry state. Since then, there has been privatisation and transformation (although whether these are cause and effect are debatable) to a situation now where passenger travel is booming. Nowhere has change been more pronounced than in East London. The redevelopment of the former docks into Docklands led to the construction of the Docklands Light Railway in the late 1980s, and the rejuvenation of other lines. The Millennium Dome celebrations and the award of the Olympic Games to Stratford each justified investment in new lines and facilities. But most of all, London's growing population has required transport, and particularly rail investment, to keep the city moving. Crossrail is the largest single investment, linking east and south-east London through the City and West End to Heathrow and Reading in the west. This book charts the changes to East London's railways from the 1970s to the forthcoming opening of Crossrail.

Chesterfield To Rothern

Chesterfield To Rothern

Author: Vic Mitchell Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/12/2020

Liverpool and Manchester Railway Atlas

Liverpool and Manchester Railway Atlas

Author: Joe (Author) Brown Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/11/2020

Railways of Oxford

Railways of Oxford

Author: Laurence Waters Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/11/2020

This is a history of the railways of Oxford ,looking at the operations and development of services , from the opening of the Oxford Railway by the Great Western on 12 June 1844 through to the present day. This volume covers the development of the railway locally, including the London and North Western Buckinghamshire Railway' from Bletchley, together with the five local branch lines. The opening of the Great Western / Great Central joint line from Culworth Junction to Banbury Junction in August 1900 resulted in the growth of inter regional cross country services passing through Oxford . The advent of the second world war saw the construction of a new junction at Oxford North giving for the first time a direct link from the Great Western to the London Midland & Scottish Railway branch to Bletchley and beyond. The opening of these two new junctions saw a considerable increase in both passenger and freight traffic which resulted in Oxford becoming a major railway centre . For many years one of the highlights was the arrival and departure of locomotives on a daily basis from all of the big four railway companies. Those days are long gone, but today Oxford is as busy as ever, with passenger services to London operated by Great Western Railway and Chiltern Trains, and by Cross Country Trains the South and the North of England.

Scotland's Railways in the 1980s and 1990s

Scotland's Railways in the 1980s and 1990s

Author: Peter J Green Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/11/2020

In the 1980s and early 1990s, Scotland was an excellent destination for the railway enthusiast. The many locomotive hauled trains running through splendid scenery, together with the surviving railway infrastructure and mechanical signalling, provided many fine photographic opportunities. My first railway visit to Scotland was on board The Fair Maid rail tour to Perth, behind Flying Scotsman in 1983\. The following year, I again travelled to Scotland, this time on the F & W Railtours The Skirl O' The Pipes 4, to Kyle of Lochalsh and Mallaig, my first visit to the Scottish Highlands. I had previously been travelling abroad for railways, but impressed by what I saw, I decided that I would quickly return to photograph the Scottish railway scene, before it changed too much. This was the start of a series of visits, each for one or two weeks, between 1984 and June 1991, covering the whole country. This book is a photographic record of the locomotives, trains and infrastructure of the railways of Scotland and the landscapes through which the trains ran, as recorded by my various cameras during the period of my visits.

Britain's Railways in the Second World War

Britain's Railways in the Second World War

Author: Michael Foley Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/11/2020

The outbreak of the Second World War had an enormous effect on the railway system in Britain. Keeping the trains running through times of conflict was not such a distant memory for the railway companies and their workers but in this second major war of the twentieth century, the task was to prove a very different one. The railway system no longer consisted of the hundreds of companies of the past, but the 'Big Four' still needed to learn how to work together and forget their differences for the war effort. The logistics of the mass evacuation of children, and transporting thousands of troops during the evacuation of Dunkirk and the preparations for D-Day, for instance, were unprecedented. At the same time, they had to cope with the new and constant threat of aerial bombing that military advances brought to the Second World War. The railway system, and the men and women who ran it, effectively served as another branch of the military during the conflict. At the end of the war, Winston Churchill likened London to a large animal, declaring that what kept the animal alive was its transport system. The metaphor could have been applied to the whole of Britain, and its most vital transport system was the railway. This book is a fascinating account of the important role that the railways played in the defence of the country as well as in their support of the Allied forces in theatres of war around the world. It brings to light the often forgotten stories of the brave and hard-working men and women who went to work on the railways and put their lives on the line.

The Great Central Railway

The Great Central Railway

Author: John Palmer Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/11/2020

For generations of railway enthusiasts and more latterly for social historians, the life and times of the former Great Central Railway and in particular its extension towards London in the 1890s and closure seventy years later, have generated considerable interest and controversy. Although many books have been written about the Railway, the majority in recent times have concentrated upon providing a photographic record and a nostalgic look in retrospect to what was generally perceived as happier times for the route. None of the books have presented the outcome from thorough research into the business aspects of the Railway and its successive private (L N E R) and public ( B R ) ownerships through war and peace, times of industrial, social and political change, that influenced and shaped the demand for a railway service. While retaining a strong railway theme throughout, the book identifies the role played by successive governments , the electricity and coal industries and the effect of social change that, together resulted in a case for closure. The content of the book replaces much supposition with fact and places on record what really happened. The final part of the book acknowledges the fine work over half a century of volunteers dedicated to saving a section of the line in Leicestershire.

Steam Across the Regions

Steam Across the Regions

Author: David Knapman Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/11/2020

This is the third volume by David Knapman, using photographs from his extensive collection. This book looks at the steam era on all the former British Railways regions, through the lens of a young railway photographer in the 1960s. The author originally lived on the Southern Region, but as the result of a family move ended up living on the former Great Eastern Railway in Essex. David Knapman was lucky, in that he was able to access London from his home and photograph steam traction at most of the London Terminus stations, as well as taking pictures at other locations in the London and home counties area, before venturing further afield, to other parts of Britain. This is an offering of his work as a young railway photographer in the 1960s, before the diesel and electric invasion, that marked the end of the steam era.

The Stanhope & Tyne Railroad Company

The Stanhope & Tyne Railroad Company

Author: Rob Langham Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/11/2020

Opened in 1834, the Stanhope & Tyne Railroad Company's line ran from the limestone district of Weardale, via the collieries of north-west Durham to the mouth of the River Tyne at South Shields. This extraordinary railway used horses, steam locomotives, stationary engines and gravity-worked inclines to transport lime, limestone and coal. The company soon found itself in financial trouble, and its downfall almost bankrupted Robert Stephenson, who was consulting engineer for the company. Change of ownership saw the line become profitable, one half being run by the newly formed Pontop & South Shields Railway Company, the other by the Stockton & Darlington Railway Company, with the two halves later coming under the ownership of the North Eastern Railway and later the London & North Eastern Railway and then British Railways. The story of this remarkable line and its varied ways of working are told here, accompanied by images of the route, the locomotives, equipment and men who ran it.

Preserved Railways of Eastern England

Preserved Railways of Eastern England

Author: Adam Head Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/11/2020

Among the many lines that branch all around the East of England, there are some that can be seen diverging from stations that are never used by the train operating companies. These lines head to hidden gems within the East of England known as preserved railways. These provide their own different views and panoramas across the East, and with their range of classic steam and diesel locomotives are a mecca for the railway enthusiast. In this book there are seven preserved railways that can be found in the East of England, all of which vary in length and in featured locomotives. Perfect for both local visitors and those from further afield considering a trip, this is an affectionate tribute to an important part of our national heritage.

East Anglia and the East Coast Railways

East Anglia and the East Coast Railways

Author: Brian Reading, Ian Reading Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/11/2020

The 1950s and 1960s was a time of profound cultural and technological transformation. With images and vivid recollections, we journey back to post-war East Anglia and the East Coast Main Line with many locations changed beyond recognition. Trackside, at busy stations, and in and around depots, an evolving mood is revealed in pictures. In the 1950s, railway pride and optimism overcame staff shortages; returning locomotives to pre-war performance and introducing modern BR standard classes. By the 1960s, fiscal efficiency and the dawning diesel era turned pride to neglect of steam. Sparkling steel, brass and tallow gave way to dust, rust and flaking paint. Heroic workhorses were lost to scrap. As the mood turned to melancholy, just a few of these great workhorses became pets - polished, loved, and cared for by dedicated railway workers and a growing band of enthusiastic volunteers. People, machines and landscapes are crystalized on film for future generations; reawakening memories for those who lived through this time of change and offering a fascinating insight for those who are too young to have been trackside during this intriguing period of railway history.