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Trains & railways: general interest

See below for a selection of the latest books from Trains & railways: general interest category. Presented with a red border are the Trains & railways: general interest books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Trains & railways: general interest books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

The Early Pioneers of Steam The Inspiration Behind George Stephenson

The Early Pioneers of Steam The Inspiration Behind George Stephenson

Author: Stuart Hylton Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/11/2019

We think of the Stephensons and Brunel as the fathers of the railways, and their Liverpool and Manchester and Great Western Railways as the prototypes of the modern systems. But who were the railways' grandfathers and great grandfathers? For the rapid evolution of the railways after 1830 depended to a considerable degree upon the Stephensons, Brunel and their contemporaries being able to draw upon centuries of experience of using and developing railways, and of harnessing the power of steam? Giants the Stephensons and others may have been, but they stood upon the shoulders of many other considerable - if lesser known - talents. This book is their story.

Main Line Operations Around Manchester

Main Line Operations Around Manchester

Author: Pixton, Robert P Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/10/2019

This book illustrates one of the country's best loved railway companies in the days of steam. Maps, charts, timetables and photographs are used to give the reader a sense of a journey from the compact terminus in Manchester to Godley, the limits of the system, at first opening. The reader is transported back to the original London Road station, using maps, and is walked through the small station to notice the variety of engines, signals and trains that operated there. Gorton, the company's shed and locomotive works as well as its across the track rivals of Beyer, Peacock, are studied. The railway cross-road at Guide Bridge is given due importance and readers may well ponder on the contrast of ruralness of Ardwick, Fairfield and Fallowfield, then, and now. Connections at the joint stations of Stalybridge and Manchester Central station are explored. The latter is expanded to include Old Trafford shed as well as the links to Trafford Park Estate. Included is a review of the impact of electrification on the system, especially the exchanges taking place where the two systems interact. The numerous Joint Lines in this district (to Oldham, Altrincham, Hayfield and Macclesfield) are looked at in a subsequent volume. Pictures, and extensive captions, have been selected to show the variety of engines used and facets of stations or procedures. Where-ever, the use of the subject to the modeller has been a guiding light.

Southern Coaches Survey Pre-Grouping and BR Mark 1 Stock

Southern Coaches Survey Pre-Grouping and BR Mark 1 Stock

Author: Mike King Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/10/2019

Britain's Railway Disasters Fatal Accidents From the 1830s to the Present Day

Britain's Railway Disasters Fatal Accidents From the 1830s to the Present Day

Author: Michael Foley Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/10/2019

Passengers on the early railways took their lives in their hands every time they got on board a train. It was so dangerous that they could buy an insurance policy with their ticket. There seemed to be an acceptance that the level of danger was tolerable in return for the speed of travel that was now available to them. British Railway Disasters looks at the most serious railway accidents from the origins of the development of the train up to the present day. Seriousness is judged on the number of those who died. Information gleaned from various newspaper reports is compared with official reports on the accidents. The book will appeal to all those with a fascination for rail transport as well as those with a love of history. Michael Foley examines the social context of how injuries and deaths on the railways were seen in the early days, as well as how claims in the courts became more common, leading to a series of medical investigations as to how travelling and crashing at high speed affected the human body.

Steam on the Eastern and Midland A New Glimpse of the 1950s and 1960s

Steam on the Eastern and Midland A New Glimpse of the 1950s and 1960s

Author: David Knapman Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/10/2019

This is the second book from David Knapman's personal record of railway views that were captured on black and white film in the late 1950's and 1960's, until the demise of steam on British Railways. The style of the book, in keeping with Steam on the Southern and Western, is the well tried and tested pictures and captions format and the majority of pictures are black and white photography. Not every picture portrays a train as there are interesting branch line and infrastructure scenes to view as well, whilst trains will be on main line and secondary routes. The book carries its share of photographs of British Railways standard locomotives in the locations appropriate to the regions. Where preservation starts to overlap with the still active steam scene, some historic photographs are included. Photographs will be grouped by a particular location, for example, York on the Eastern and Hatch End on the Midland. Each of these topic areas will provide a flavour of the railway activity at the time. The book provides the reader with another gentle meander through the 1950's and 1960's railway scene and stir the memories that so many of us have seen and treasure.

The Corris Railway The Story of a Mid-Wales Slate Railway

The Corris Railway The Story of a Mid-Wales Slate Railway

Author: Peter Johnson Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/10/2019

One of Wales' oldest narrow gauge railways, the 2ft 3in gauge Corris Railway was built to carry slate from several quarries in the Dulas valley to wharves on the river Dyfi. At first forbidden to use steam locomotives or to carry passengers, it overcame these obstacles and became an essential part of the community that it served. It was also a forerunner in encouraging tourists, offering inclusive tours to nearby Talyllyn, passengers travelling on the train and on railway-operated road services. Taken over by the Great Western Railway in 1930, the railway was closed by British Railways in 1948, apparently for good. Fortunately, the last two steam locomotives and some rolling stock was saved by the nearby Talyllyn Railway, where it played an essential role in that railway's preservation. Eventually, the thoughts of enthusiasts turned to reviving the Corris Railway, and, after many twists and turns, the first passengers were carried on a short section in 2002. Historian Peter Johnson has delved into many sources to uncover the intricacies of the railway's origins, its development, operation and revival.

Great Central From Nationalisation to Rationalisation

Great Central From Nationalisation to Rationalisation

Author: Peter Waller Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/10/2019

Gresley's V2s

Gresley's V2s

Author: Peter Tuffrey Format: Hardback Release Date: 21/10/2019

Sir Nigel Gresley's V2 Class 2-6-2 locomotive was developed during a period of great success for the London & North Eastern Railway company. The A3 Class and A4 Class Pacifics were breaking records and creating headlines across the globe when the first V2 appeared in 1936. The class was derived from the A3 and inherited many characteristics, such as power, speed and reliability. Employed on both express freight and passenger trains, the V2s soon joined the ranks of their illustrious forebears with both footplatemen and enthusiasts alike. Gresley's V2s documents the vast majority of the 184 locomotives built through evocative colour and black and white images, alongside well-researched captions. The engines appear from introduction in the mid-1930s through the war years and into ownership by British Railways. The photographs capture the V2s at work along the East Coast Main Line and elsewhere, such as the ex-Great Central Railway main line and into Scotland. Engines are seen from the lineside, in stations and on shed. A short section celebrates the only preserved V2, no. 4771 Green Arrow. Whilst the locomotive was operational for a number of years, from the late 2000s no. 4771 has been a static display at the National Railway Museum. There are currently plans to restore the engine at some point in the future, but in the meantime Gresley's V2s serves as reminder of the distinguished service the class provided to both the LNER and BR.

The Grand Crimean Central Railway

The Grand Crimean Central Railway

Author: Anthony Dawson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/10/2019

The Crimean War, fought by the unusual alliance of Great Britain, France, and the tiny Italian Kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia alongside Turkey against Tsarist Russia was the first `modern' war, not only for its vast scale (France mobilised a million men), but also the technologies involved; from iron-clad battleships to rifled artillery, the electric telegraph and steam. In Britain, the Crimea War is best-remembered for the blunder of the Charge of the Light Brigade, the fearful conditions in the trench at the front, and the ministry of Florence Nightingale. The Grand Crimean Central Railway was the brainchild of two Victorian Railway Magnates, Samuel Morton Peto and Thomas Brassey: in order to alleviate the suffering at the front they volunteered to build at cost a steam railway linking the Allied camps at Sevastopol to their supply base at Balaclava. In the face of much official opposition, the railway was built and operational in a matter of months, supplying hundreds of tons of food, clothing and material to the starving and freezing men in their trenches. It was a railway that won a war and saved countless thousands of lives.