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History of medicine

See below for a selection of the latest books from History of medicine category. Presented with a red border are the History of medicine books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great History of medicine books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Civic Medicine Physician, Polity, and Pen in Early Modern Europe

Civic Medicine Physician, Polity, and Pen in Early Modern Europe

Author: Annemarie Kinzelbach, Andrew Mendelsohn Format: Hardback Release Date: 20/08/2019

Communities great and small across Europe for eight centuries have contracted with doctors. Physicians provided citizen care, helped govern, and often led in public life. Civic Medicine stakes out this timely subject by focusing on its golden age, when cities rivaled territorial states in local and global Europe and when civic doctors were central to the rise of shared, organized written information about the human and natural world. This opens the prospect of a long history of knowledge and action shaped more by community and responsibility than market or state, exchange or power.

Medicine Antiquity and Its Legacy

Medicine Antiquity and Its Legacy

Author: Caroline Petit Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/07/2019

The extent to which classical theories about, and practices of, medical knowledge have shaped and continue to define medicine today is remarkable: but not always widely appreciated. Caroline Petit here offers a concise yet comprehensive account of medicine in antiquity which explores precisely that fascinating legacy. Discussing topics such as medical ethics, diagnostic explanations of illness and disease, matters of sex and gender, the ancient division between body and soul, interpretations of madness and melancholia, and methods of medical teaching and dissemination, the author draws fascinating parallels between the ancient, early modern and modern periods. We learn, positively, that the ancient medical thinking of Galen, Hippocrates and Soranos of Ephesus nourished the thought of some of the greatest physicians in history; but also that, negatively, modern medical thinkers sometimes misused ancient texts in pursuit of their own social and political agendas - a recurring problem in the history of medicine.Discussing a variety of ancient texts, from the Hippocratic era to the late Roman Empire, and examining contested literary evidence and interpretations, Petit skilfully traces the trajectory of medical practice from its magical and religious origins to a rational science of pathology, physiology, surgery and anatomy.

Medicine Antiquity and Its Legacy

Medicine Antiquity and Its Legacy

Author: Caroline Petit Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/07/2019

The extent to which classical theories about, and practices of, medical knowledge have shaped and continue to define medicine today is remarkable: but not always widely appreciated. Caroline Petit here offers a concise yet comprehensive account of medicine in antiquity which explores precisely that fascinating legacy. Discussing topics such as medical ethics, diagnostic explanations of illness and disease, matters of sex and gender, the ancient division between body and soul, interpretations of madness and melancholia, and methods of medical teaching and dissemination, the author draws fascinating parallels between the ancient, early modern and modern periods. We learn, positively, that the ancient medical thinking of Galen, Hippocrates and Soranos of Ephesus nourished the thought of some of the greatest physicians in history; but also that, negatively, modern medical thinkers sometimes misused ancient texts in pursuit of their own social and political agendas - a recurring problem in the history of medicine.Discussing a variety of ancient texts, from the Hippocratic era to the late Roman Empire, and examining contested literary evidence and interpretations, Petit skilfully traces the trajectory of medical practice from its magical and religious origins to a rational science of pathology, physiology, surgery and anatomy.

Medicine, the Penal System and Sexual Crimes in England, 1919-1960s Diagnosing Deviance

Medicine, the Penal System and Sexual Crimes in England, 1919-1960s Diagnosing Deviance

Author: Janet (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK) Weston Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 25/07/2019

Sexual crime, past and present, is rarely far from the headlines. How these crimes are punished, policed and understood has changed considerably over the last century. From hormone injections to cognitive behavioural therapy, medical and psychological approaches to sexual offenders have proliferated. This book sets out the history of such theories and treatments in England. Beginning in the early 20th century, it traces the evolution of medical interest in the mental state of those convicted of sexual crime. As part of a broader interest in individualised responses to crime as a means to rehabilitation, doctors offered new explanations for some sexual crimes, proposed new solutions, and attempted to deliver new cures. From indecent exposure to homosexuality between men, from sadistic violence to thefts of underwear from washing lines, the interpretation and treatment of some sexual offences was thought to be complex. Of less medical interest, though, were offences against children, prostitution, and rape. Using a range of material, including medical and criminological texts, trial proceedings, government reports, newspapers, and autobiographies and memoirs, Janet Weston offers powerful insights into changing medico-legal practices and attitudes towards sex and health. She highlights the importance of prison doctors and rehabilitative programmes within prisons, psychoanalytically-minded private practitioners, and the interactions between medical and legal systems as medical theories were put into practice. She also reveals the extent and legacy of medical thought, as well as the limitations of a medical approach to sexual crime.

Medical Practice in Twelfth-century China - A Translation of Xu Shuwei's Ninety Discussions [Cases] on Cold Damage Disorders

Medical Practice in Twelfth-century China - A Translation of Xu Shuwei's Ninety Discussions [Cases] on Cold Damage Disorders

Author: Asaf Goldschmidt Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/07/2019

This book is an annotated translation of Xu Shuwei's (1080-1154) collection of 90 medical case records - Ninety Discussions of Cold Damage Disorders (shanghan jiushi lun ) - which was the first such collection in China. The translation reveals patterns of social as well as medical history. This book provides the readers with a distinctive first hand perspective on twelfth-century medical practice, including medical aspects, such as nosology, diagnosis, treatment, and doctrinal reasoning supporting them. It also presents the social aspect of medical practice, detailing the various participants in the medical encounter, their role, the power relations within the encounter, and the location where the encounter occurred. Reading the translation of Xu's cases allows the readers high-resolution snapshots of medicine and medical practice as reflected from the case records documented by this leading twelfth-century physician. The detailed introduction to the translation contextualizes Xu's life and medical practice in the broader changes of this transformative era.

Medicine and Justice Medico-Legal Practice in England and Wales, 1700-1914

Medicine and Justice Medico-Legal Practice in England and Wales, 1700-1914

Author: Katherine D. (Oxford Brookes University, UK) Watson Format: Hardback Release Date: 13/07/2019

In the past ten years medical and legal historians have clearly acknowledged the fertile links that have long existed between medicine and the law in Britain. However, this far-reaching subject has been comparatively unexplored in the English and Welsh context. This monograph, drawing on the details of c. 3000 cases of serious violence against the person which occurred in northern and central England, Wales and London, offers a comparative long-term perspective on medico-legal practice, and argues that it is only by exploring local practices that we can begin to understand how and why medicine and medical practitioners evolved into an essential and important presence in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century courtrooms. The comparison between centre and periphery, urban and rural, and between regions adds a significant new dimension to the existing scholarship on the relationship between medicine and the law. This book will critically examine how doctors mediated between medicine and the law, investigating the real practices of medical practitioners who were faced with suspicious deaths, and how this experience interfaced with medical and legal theory. While other historians, notably Catherine Crawford, have considered the academic discipline of forensic medicine and its importance in medical discourses, few historians have studied medico-legal practice, that is, what doctors actually did when they were faced with a body that had become the object of a criminal investigation. The vexed questions of authority, expertise, and the links between theory and practice are illuminated here in relation to the law, medicine and the areas where the two meet, but provide the methodology and blueprint for further study in other times, places and disciplines.

Making Medicine in Reformation Nuremberg

Making Medicine in Reformation Nuremberg

Author: Hannah Murphy Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/06/2019

The sixteenth century saw an unprecedented growth in the number of educated physicians practicing in German cities. Concentrating on Nuremberg, A New Order of Medicine follows the intertwined careers of municipal physicians as they encountered the challenges of the Reformation city for the first time. Although conservative in their professed Galenism, these men were eclectic in their practices, which ranged from book collecting to botany to subversive anatomical experimentations. Their interests and ambitions lead to local controversy. Over a twenty-year campaign, apothecaries were wrested from their place at the forefront of medical practice, no longer able to innovate remedies, while physicians, recent arrivals in the city, established themselves as the leading authorities. Examining archives, manuscript records, printed texts, and material and visual sources, and considering a wide range of diseases, Hannah Murphy offers the first systematic interpretation of the growth of elite medical practice, its relationship to Galenic theory, and the emergence of medical order in the contested world of the German city.

Cambridge Library Collection - History of Medicine The History of the Plague, as It Has Lately Appeared in the Islands of Malta, Goza, Corfu, Cephalonia: Detailing Important Facts, Illustrative of the

Cambridge Library Collection - History of Medicine The History of the Plague, as It Has Lately Appeared in the Islands of Malta, Goza, Corfu, Cephalonia: Detailing Important Facts, Illustrative of the

Author: James Dillon Tully Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/06/2019

An army surgeon and later deputy inspector of hospitals in Jamaica, James Dillon Tully (1785-1827) witnessed at first hand the spread of the plague through the Mediterranean in the early nineteenth century. In particular, he was instrumental in controlling the disease in Corfu and Cephalonia. This work, first published in 1821, is his account of the outbreak and the response to it after its arrival by ship in Malta. Tully's goal in writing the book was to educate the public about the plague, in response to doubts over the nature of this recent outbreak. He focuses on describing the disease, the manner by which it spread, and methods of treating and controlling it. Stressing the historical effectiveness of quarantine and spelling out its implementation in the Mediterranean, this work is a detailed and methodical source which remains of interest to researchers in the history of medicine and epidemiology.

Cambridge Library Collection - History of Medicine Observations on the Diseases of the Army: In Camp and Garrison

Cambridge Library Collection - History of Medicine Observations on the Diseases of the Army: In Camp and Garrison

Author: John Pringle Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/06/2019

This book has been described as a 'watershed work [which] has probably not received the credit it deserves'. Its author, John Pringle (1707-82), gained his experience of military medicine as physician to Lord Stair, the commander of the British army in Europe. The duke of Cumberland later promoted him to physician-general, and he served in the army until 1748. His 'observations' were published in 1752, and were immediately successful: this revised second edition was published in 1753, and many further editions followed. Pringle became acutely aware that the field and permanent hospitals designed to treat wounded soldiers were in fact a large part of the problem of sickness and death, since contagious diseases spread rapidly among weakened men in unhygienic surroundings. He made practical suggestions to improve hygiene and isolate the sick, but unfortunately his often simple proposals were ignored by the army high command for almost a century.

Networks of Innovation Vaccine Development at Merck, Sharp and Dohme, and Mulford, 1895-1995

Networks of Innovation Vaccine Development at Merck, Sharp and Dohme, and Mulford, 1895-1995

Author: Louis Galambos, Jane Eliot Sewell Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/06/2019

Networks of Innovation offers an historical perspective on the manner in which private-sector organizations have acquired, sustained, and periodically lost the ability to develop, manufacture, and market new serum antitoxins and vaccines. The primary focus is on the H. K. Mulford Company, on Sharp and Dohme, which acquired Mulford in 1929, and upon Merck & Co Inc., which merged with Sharp and Dohme in 1953. By surveying a century of innovation in biologicals, the authors are able to analyze the conditions that either promoted or prevented creative changes in this important industry. They show how the activities of these three commercial enterprises were related to a series of complex, evolving networks of scientific, governmental, and medical institutions in the United States and abroad. This is the first such history to draw exclusively on sources internal to Merck, one of the world's leading innovators in modern vaccines and pharmaceuticals.

Migraine A History

Migraine A History

Author: Katherine Foxhall Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 18/06/2019

For centuries, people have talked of a powerful bodily disorder called migraine, which currently affects about a billion people around the world. Yet until now, the rich history of this condition has barely been told. In Migraine, award-winning historian Katherine Foxhall reveals the ideas and methods that ordinary people and medical professionals have used to describe, explain, and treat migraine since the Middle Ages. Touching on classical theories of humoral disturbance and medieval bloodletting, Foxhall also describes early modern herbal remedies, the emergence of neurology, and evolving practices of therapeutic experimentation. Throughout the book, Foxhall persuasively argues that our current knowledge of migraine's neurobiology is founded on a centuries-long social, cultural, and medical history. This history, she demonstrates, continues to profoundly shape our knowledge of this complicated disease, our attitudes toward people who have migraine, and the sometimes drastic measures that we take to address pain. Migraine is an intimate look at how cultural attitudes and therapeutic practices have changed radically in response to medical and pharmaceutical developments. Foxhall draws on a wealth of previously unexamined sources, including medieval manuscripts, early-modern recipe books, professional medical journals, hospital case notes, newspaper advertisements, private diaries, consultation letters, artworks, poetry, and YouTube videos. Deeply researched and beautifully written, this fascinating and accessible study of one of our most common, disabling-and yet often dismissed-disorders will appeal to physicians, historians, scholars in medical humanities, and people living with migraine alike.

Synthesizing Hope Matter, Knowledge, and Place in South African Drug Discovery

Synthesizing Hope Matter, Knowledge, and Place in South African Drug Discovery

Author: Anne Pollock Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 10/06/2019

Synthesizing Hope opens up the material and social world of pharmaceuticals by focusing on an unexpected place: iThemba Pharmaceuticals. Founded in 2009 with a name taken from the Zulu word for hope, the small South African startup with an elite international scientific board was tasked with drug discovery for tuberculosis, HIV, and malaria. Anne Pollock uses this company as an entry point for exploring how the location of the scientific knowledge production matters, not only for the raw materials, production, licensing, and distribution of pharmaceuticals but also for the making of basic scientific knowledge. Consideration of this case exposes the limitations of global health frameworks that implicitly posit rich countries as the only sites of knowledge production. Analysis of iThemba identifies the problems inherent in global north/south divides at the same time as it highlights what is at stake in who makes knowledge and where. It also provides a concrete example for consideration of the contexts and practices of postcolonial science, its constraints, and its promise. Synthesizing Hope explores the many legacies that create conditions of possibility for South African drug discovery, especially the specific form of settler colonialism characterized by apartheid and resource extraction. Paying attention to the infrastructures and laboratory processes of drug discovery underscores the materiality of pharmaceuticals from the perspective of their makers, and tracing the intellectual and material infrastructures of South African drug discovery contributes new insights about larger social, political, and economic orders.