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History of medicine

See below for a selection of the latest books from History of medicine category. Presented with a red border are the History of medicine books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great History of medicine books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Military Medicine and the Making of Race Life and Death in the West India Regiments, 1795-1874

Military Medicine and the Making of Race Life and Death in the West India Regiments, 1795-1874

Author: Tim (University of Warwick) Lockley Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/03/2020

This book demonstrates how Britain's black soldiers helped shape attitudes towards race throughout the nineteenth century. The West India Regiments were part of the British military establishment for 132 years, generating vast records with details about every one of their 100,000+ recruits which made them the best-documented group of black men in the Atlantic World. Tim Lockley shows how, in the late eighteenth century, surgeons established in medical literature that white and black bodies were radically different, forging a notion of the 'superhuman' black soldier able to undertake physical challenges far beyond white soldiers. By the late 1830s, however, military statisticians would contest these ideas and highlight the vulnerabilities of black soldiers instead. The popularity and pervasiveness of these publications spread far beyond British military or medical circles and had a significant international impact, particularly in the US, both reflecting and reinforcing changing notions about blackness.

Radiation Evangelists Technology, Therapy, and Uncertainty at the Turn of the Century

Radiation Evangelists Technology, Therapy, and Uncertainty at the Turn of the Century

Author: Jeffrey Womack Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/03/2020

Radiation Evangelists explores x-ray and radium therapy in the United States and Great Britain during a crucial period of its development, from 1896 to 1925. It focuses on the pioneering work of early advocates in the field, the radiation evangelists who, motivated by their faith in a new technology, trust in new energy sources, and hope for future breakthroughs, turned a blind eye to the dangers of radiation exposure. Although ionizing radiation effectively treated diseases like skin infections and cancers, radiation therapists--who did not need a medical education to develop or administer procedures or sell tonics containing radium--operated in a space of uncertainty about exactly how radiation worked or would affect human bodies. And yet radium, once a specialized medical treatment, would eventually become a consumer health product associated with the antibacterial properties of sunlight. This book raises important questions about medical experimentation and the so-called Golden Rule of medical ethics, issues of safety and professional identity, and the temptation of a powerful therapeutic tool that also posed significant risks in its formative years. In this cautionary tale of technological medical progress, Jeffrey Womack reveals how practitioners and their patients accepted uncertainty as a condition of their therapy in an attempt to alleviate the human suffering it would ultimately cause.

Lifestyle and Medicine in the Enlightenment The Six Non-Naturals in the Long Eighteenth Century

Lifestyle and Medicine in the Enlightenment The Six Non-Naturals in the Long Eighteenth Century

Author: James (University of Roehampton, UK) Kennaway Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/03/2020

The biggest challenges in public health today are often related to attitudes, diet and exercise. In many ways, this marks a return to the state of medicine in the eighteenth century, when ideals of healthy living were a much more central part of the European consciousness than they have become since the advent of modern clinical medicine. Enlightenment advice on healthy lifestyle was often still discussed in terms of the six non-naturals - airs and places, food and drink, exercise, excretion and retention, and sleep and emotions. This volume examines what it meant to live healthily in the Enlightenment in the context of those non-naturals, showing both the profound continuities from Antiquity and the impact of newer conceptions of the body.

Appetite and Its Discontents Science, Medicine, and the Urge to Eat, 1750-1950

Appetite and Its Discontents Science, Medicine, and the Urge to Eat, 1750-1950

Author: Elizabeth A Williams Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 26/03/2020

Why do we eat? Is it instinct, or some other impetus? Despite the necessity of food, anxieties about what and how to eat are widespread in our culture, and scientists and physicians continue to have shifting theories about the phenomenon of appetite and its causes and norms. In Appetite and Its Discontents, Elizabeth A. Williams charts the history of inquiry into appetite between 1750 and 1950, as scientific and medical concepts of appetite shifted alongside developments in physiology, natural history, psychology, and ethology. Williams argues that trust in appetite was undermined in the mid-eighteenth century, when researchers who investigated ingestion and digestion began claiming that science alone could say which ways of eating were healthy and which were not. Tracing nineteenth- and twentieth-century conflicts over the nature of appetite, Williams explores contemporary worries about eating through the lens of science and medicine to show us how appetite--once a matter of personal inclination--became an object of science.

Appetite and Its Discontents Science, Medicine, and the Urge to Eat, 1750-1950

Appetite and Its Discontents Science, Medicine, and the Urge to Eat, 1750-1950

Author: Elizabeth A Williams Format: Hardback Release Date: 26/03/2020

Why do we eat? Is it instinct, or some other impetus? Despite the necessity of food, anxieties about what and how to eat are widespread in our culture, and scientists and physicians continue to have shifting theories about the phenomenon of appetite and its causes and norms. In Appetite and Its Discontents, Elizabeth A. Williams charts the history of inquiry into appetite between 1750 and 1950, as scientific and medical concepts of appetite shifted alongside developments in physiology, natural history, psychology, and ethology. Williams argues that trust in appetite was undermined in the mid-eighteenth century, when researchers who investigated ingestion and digestion began claiming that science alone could say which ways of eating were healthy and which were not. Tracing nineteenth- and twentieth-century conflicts over the nature of appetite, Williams explores contemporary worries about eating through the lens of science and medicine to show us how appetite--once a matter of personal inclination--became an object of science.

Can Medicine Be Cured? The Corruption of a Profession

Can Medicine Be Cured? The Corruption of a Profession

Author: Seamus O'Mahony Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 05/03/2020

A fierce, honest, elegant and often hilarious debunking of the great fallacies that drive modern medicine. 'A deeply fascinating and rousing book' Mail on Sunday. 'What makes this book a delightful, if unsettling read, is not just O'Mahony's scholarly and witty prose, but also his brutal honesty' The Times. Seamus O'Mahony writes about the illusion of progress, the notion that more and more diseases can be 'conquered' ad infinitum. He punctures the idiocy of consumerism, the idea that healthcare can be endlessly adapted to the wishes of individuals. He excoriates the claims of Big Science, the spending of vast sums on research follies like the Human Genome Project. And he highlights one of the most dangerous errors of industrialized medicine: an over-reliance on metrics, and a neglect of things that can't easily be measured, like compassion.

Balancing the Self Medicine, Politics and the Regulation of Health in the Twentieth Century

Balancing the Self Medicine, Politics and the Regulation of Health in the Twentieth Century

Author: Mark Jackson Format: Hardback Release Date: 28/02/2020

Balancing the Self explores the diverse ways in which balanced and unbalanced selfhoods have been subject to construction, intervention and challenge across the long twentieth century. Chapters on diabetes, 'sensible drinking', obesity control, dietetic regulation, fatigue, heart disease, physical and emotional extremes, Parkinson's disease and other conditions understood in terms of disordered balance analyse the ways in which the mechanisms and meanings of balance have been framed historically. Together, contributions examine the positive narratives that have been attached to the ideals and practices of `self-help', and the extent to which rhetorics of empowerment and responsibility have been used for a variety of purposes, from disciplining bodies to cutting social security provision. -- .

Migrant Architects of the NHS South Asian Doctors and the Reinvention of British General Practice (1940s-1980s)

Migrant Architects of the NHS South Asian Doctors and the Reinvention of British General Practice (1940s-1980s)

Author: Julian Simpson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 14/02/2020

Migrant architects of the NHS draws on forty-five oral history interviews and extensive archival research to offer a radical reappraisal of how the National Health Service was made. It tells the story of migrant South Asian doctors who became general practitioners in the NHS. Imperial legacies, professional discrimination and an exodus of UK-trained doctors combined to direct these doctors towards work as GPs in some of the most deprived parts of the UK. In some areas, they made up over half of the general practitioner workforce. The NHS was structurally dependent on them and they shaped British society and medicine through their agency. Aimed at students and academics with interests in the history of immigration, immigration studies, the history of medicine, South Asian studies and oral history. It will also be of interest to anyone who wants to know more about how Empire and migration have contributed to making Britain what it is today. -- .

Progress and Pathology Medicine and Culture in the Nineteenth Century

Progress and Pathology Medicine and Culture in the Nineteenth Century

Author: Laurens Schlicht Format: Hardback Release Date: 14/02/2020

This collaborative volume explores changing perceptions of health and disease in the context of the burgeoning global modernities of the nineteenth century. With case studies from Britain, America, France, Germany, Finland, Bengal, China and the South Pacific, it demonstrates how popular and medical understandings of the mind and body were reframed by the social, cultural and political structures of 'modern life'. Essays within the collection examine ways in which cancer, suicide, and social degeneration were seen as products of the stresses and strains of 'new' ways of living. Others explore the legal, institutional, and intellectual changes that contributed to modern medical practice. The volume traces ways that physiological and psychological problems were being constituted in relation to each other, and to their social contexts, and offers new ways of contextualising the problems of modernity facing us in the twenty-first century. -- .

Stalin And Medicine: Untold Stories

Stalin And Medicine: Untold Stories

Author: Natalya (Univ Of Utah, Usa) Rapoport Format: Hardback Release Date: 13/02/2020

The manuscript treats the relationship between the totalitarian regime and science in a series of stories that describe the lives and times of outstanding medical scientists who represented the top of the Soviet intellectual elite of the 20th century.The narrations are based on first-hand accounts the author gained in conversations with her father, a world-renowned pathologist, and family friends, such as Nobel Prize physicist Lev Landau; a world-recognized physiologist Lina Stern; the pioneers of cancer biotherapy, Klyueva and Roskin; the 'father' of the H-bomb, Andrey Sakharov; and the daughter of the Head of the Kremlin Hospital, Alexandra Kanel.The author describes Stalin's fabrication of the 'Doctors' Plot'; the cases of Stalin's revenge on his doctors; the dramatic history of the Moscow Brain Institute; the history of an anti-plague vaccine and plague outbreak in the center of Moscow; and other events of historical significance. Ironically, Stalin's persecution of medical scientists and doctors bounced back and accelerated his death (hence the title, 'Boomerang').The echo of Stalin's repression of medical doctors and scientists still resonates today, almost 70 years after Stalin's death, in the plight of medicine in current Russia.The real stories described in the book are absorbing and captivating. The reader gets a glimpse of the destructive behind-the-scene events associated with the intervention of a totalitarian government in medicine and medical science.Through the years, the BBC Witness program aired several interviews with the author's father and herself. Recently, The BBC News produced a short cartoon based on one of the author's stories, which enjoyed more than 250,000 viewers. David Remnick dedicated a chapter to Rapoport's family in his Pulitzer Prize awarded book, Lenin's Tomb.In the US, one series of the PBS Red Empire program was dedicated to the 'Doctors' Plot' and partly shot in the author's Moscow apartment. A number of documentaries were also shot in this apartment by various European TV and movie programs. However, none of the stories described in the manuscript (with the exception of the edited version of the chapter on the 'Doctors' Plot') has ever been published in English.

Stalin And Medicine: Untold Stories

Stalin And Medicine: Untold Stories

Author: Natalya (Univ Of Utah, Usa) Rapoport Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 13/02/2020

The manuscript treats the relationship between the totalitarian regime and science in a series of stories that describe the lives and times of outstanding medical scientists who represented the top of the Soviet intellectual elite of the 20th century.The narrations are based on first-hand accounts the author gained in conversations with her father, a world-renowned pathologist, and family friends, such as Nobel Prize physicist Lev Landau; a world-recognized physiologist Lina Stern; the pioneers of cancer biotherapy, Klyueva and Roskin; the 'father' of the H-bomb, Andrey Sakharov; and the daughter of the Head of the Kremlin Hospital, Alexandra Kanel.The author describes Stalin's fabrication of the 'Doctors' Plot'; the cases of Stalin's revenge on his doctors; the dramatic history of the Moscow Brain Institute; the history of an anti-plague vaccine and plague outbreak in the center of Moscow; and other events of historical significance. Ironically, Stalin's persecution of medical scientists and doctors bounced back and accelerated his death (hence the title, 'Boomerang').The echo of Stalin's repression of medical doctors and scientists still resonates today, almost 70 years after Stalin's death, in the plight of medicine in current Russia.The real stories described in the book are absorbing and captivating. The reader gets a glimpse of the destructive behind-the-scene events associated with the intervention of a totalitarian government in medicine and medical science.Through the years, the BBC Witness program aired several interviews with the author's father and herself. Recently, The BBC News produced a short cartoon based on one of the author's stories, which enjoyed more than 250,000 viewers. David Remnick dedicated a chapter to Rapoport's family in his Pulitzer Prize awarded book, Lenin's Tomb.In the US, one series of the PBS Red Empire program was dedicated to the 'Doctors' Plot' and partly shot in the author's Moscow apartment. A number of documentaries were also shot in this apartment by various European TV and movie programs. However, none of the stories described in the manuscript (with the exception of the edited version of the chapter on the 'Doctors' Plot') has ever been published in English.

Medicine and Markets Essays on Ancient Medicine in honour of Vivian Nutton

Medicine and Markets Essays on Ancient Medicine in honour of Vivian Nutton

Author: Laurence Totelin Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/01/2020

The study of ancient medicine has been revolutionised over the last half century and Vivian Nutton has been a leading figure. Here distinguished colleagues and former students offer essays in his honour, developing themes from his ground-breaking scholarship. The book explores the diversity of the ancient medical marketplace. From the Bronze Age to Classical Antiquity (with glimpses forward to the Digital Age), from the cult of Artemis to the corpuscular theories of Asclepiades of Bithynia, from the medicinal uses of beavers to the cost of healthcare and wet-nursing, and from remedy exchange to the medical repercussions of political assassination.