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Social law

See below for a selection of the latest books from Social law category. Presented with a red border are the Social law books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Social law books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Mixed Martial Arts and the Law Disputes, Suits and Legal Issues Surrounding the Controversial Sport

Mixed Martial Arts and the Law Disputes, Suits and Legal Issues Surrounding the Controversial Sport

Author: Jason J. Cruz Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/09/2019

Barbaric. Savage. Violent. Words often used by critics to describe the sport of mixed martial arts. To this can be added lucrative, popular and flourishing. MMA has seen astronomical growth since the 2000s, spurred on by its biggest promotion, the Ultimate Fighting Championships (UFC). Along the way, legal issues have plagued the sport. This book provides an overview of the most important cases and controversies arising both inside and outside of the cage-antitrust suits by fighters against promoters, fighters suing other fighters, drug testing, contractual issues, and the need for federal regulation.

The Politics of Hate Speech Laws

The Politics of Hate Speech Laws

Author: Alexander Brown, Adriana Sinclair Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/09/2019

This book examines the complex relationship between politics and hate speech laws, domestic and international. How do political contexts shape understandings of what hate speech is and how to deal with it? Why do particular states enact hate speech laws and then apply, extend or reform them in the ways they do? What part does hate speech play in international affairs? Why do some but not all states negotiate, agree and ratify international hate speech frameworks or instruments? What are some of the best and worst political arguments for and against hate speech laws? Do political figures have special moral duties to refrain from hate speech? Should the use of hate speech by political figures be protected by parliamentary privilege? Should this sort of hyperpolitical hate speech be subject to the laws of the land, civil and criminal? Or should it instead be handled by parliamentary codes of conduct and procedures or even by political parties themselves? What should the codes of conduct look like? Brown and Sinclair answer these important and overlooked questions on the politics of hate speech laws, providing a substantial body of new evidence, insights, arguments, theories and practical recommendations. The primary focus is on the UK and the US but several other country contexts are also explored and compared in detail, including: Nigeria, Kenya, South Africa, India, China, Japan, Turkey, Germany, Hungary, and Italy. Methodologically, the two authors draw on approaches and concepts from a range of academic disciplines, including: law and legal theory, political theory, applied ethics, political science and sociology, international relations theory and international law.

National Security and the D-Notice System

National Security and the D-Notice System

Author: Pauline Sadler Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/09/2019

This title was first published in 2001. The D-Notice system is a voluntary arrangement between the government and the media whereby the media agree not to publish certain information in the interests of national security. This original and thought-provoking book identifies a major deficiency in both the D-Notice system and the legal alternatives to the system.

The Social Construction of Sexual Harassment Law The Role of the National, Organizational and Individual Context

The Social Construction of Sexual Harassment Law The Role of the National, Organizational and Individual Context

Author: Mia L. Cahill Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/09/2019

This title was first published in 2001. The global legal landscape is littered with attempts to provide context and meaning for sexual harassment law. Most have failed because they have limited themselves to the mere words of law. This cross-national study is the first to expand our notion of sexual harassment law and implementation by exposing the relationship between law and its social context, demonstrating how this fundamentally influences legal understandings and outcomes. Taking a unique theoretical approach, this book explores perceptions of law within national, corporate and the individual contexts, analyzing the potentials of each level to influence the social understanding of law and the wider role of law in society itself. The result is a pioneering work of fresh insight which will appeal to a broad range of academic disciplines.

Making Settlement Work An Examination of the Work of Judicial Mediators

Making Settlement Work An Examination of the Work of Judicial Mediators

Author: Stacy Lee Burns Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/09/2019

This title was first published in 2000. The trend in the public courts and in the private sector toward resolving civil cases through mediation, as opposed to arbitration or trial, seems inescapable. This book documents the emergence of a burgeoning private dispute resolution industry utilizing the services of retired judges, many of whom left the bench early to work as professional mediators.

The Democratic Courthouse A Modern History of Design, Due Process and Dignity

The Democratic Courthouse A Modern History of Design, Due Process and Dignity

Author: Linda Mulcahy, Emma Rowden Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 24/09/2019

The Democratic Courthouse examines how changing understandings of the relationship between government and the governed came to be reflected in the buildings designed to house the modern legal system from the 1970s to the present day in England and Wales. The book explores the extent to which egalitarian ideals and the pursuit of new social and economic rights altered existing hierarchies and expectations about how people should interact with each other in the courthouse. Drawing on extensive public and private archives kept by the Ministry of Justice, but also using case studies from other jurisdictions, the book details how civil servants, judges, lawyers, architects, engineers and security experts have talked about courthouses and the people that populate them. In doing so, it uncovers a changing history of ideas about how the competing goals of transparency, majesty, participation, security, fairness and authority have been achieved, and the extent to which aspirations towards equality and participation have been realized in physical form. As this book demonstrates, the power of architecture to frame attitudes and expectations of the justice system is much more than an aesthetic or theoretical nicety. Legal subjects live in a world in which the configuration of space, the cues provided about behaviour by the built form and the way in which justice is symbolised play a crucial, but largely unacknowledged, role in creating meaning and constituting legal identities and rights to participate in the civic sphere. Key to understanding the modern day courthouse, this book will be of interest to legal scholars and students in all fields of law, sociology, political science, psychology and criminology.

The Democratic Courthouse A Modern History of Design, Due Process and Dignity

The Democratic Courthouse A Modern History of Design, Due Process and Dignity

Author: Linda Mulcahy, Emma Rowden Format: Hardback Release Date: 24/09/2019

The Democratic Courthouse examines how changing understandings of the relationship between government and the governed came to be reflected in the buildings designed to house the modern legal system from the 1970s to the present day in England and Wales. The book explores the extent to which egalitarian ideals and the pursuit of new social and economic rights altered existing hierarchies and expectations about how people should interact with each other in the courthouse. Drawing on extensive public and private archives kept by the Ministry of Justice, but also using case studies from other jurisdictions, the book details how civil servants, judges, lawyers, architects, engineers and security experts have talked about courthouses and the people that populate them. In doing so, it uncovers a changing history of ideas about how the competing goals of transparency, majesty, participation, security, fairness and authority have been achieved, and the extent to which aspirations towards equality and participation have been realized in physical form. As this book demonstrates, the power of architecture to frame attitudes and expectations of the justice system is much more than an aesthetic or theoretical nicety. Legal subjects live in a world in which the configuration of space, the cues provided about behaviour by the built form and the way in which justice is symbolised play a crucial, but largely unacknowledged, role in creating meaning and constituting legal identities and rights to participate in the civic sphere. Key to understanding the modern day courthouse, this book will be of interest to legal scholars and students in all fields of law, sociology, political science, psychology and criminology.

State Law, Dispute Processing And Legal Pluralism Unspoken Dialogues From Rural India

State Law, Dispute Processing And Legal Pluralism Unspoken Dialogues From Rural India

Author: Kalindi Kokal Format: Hardback Release Date: 29/08/2019

This book presents an ethnography of dispute processing by non-state forums and actors in rural India. As such it sheds light on a much neglected and contested topic. Arising in the context of recent legal and political debates that question the legitimacy of non-state actors engaged in dispute processing, the book explores the nature, form and functioning of non-state forums and actors in two locations in rural India. Focusing on a fishermen's community belonging to the Hindu Machimar Koli caste in coastal Maharashtra and an agrarian community in Uttarakhand with members from the Pandit, Thakur, Bhotia and Harijan caste groups, this study shows the manner in which non-state forums and actors engage with state law and its regulatory systems.

The Politics of Hate Speech Laws

The Politics of Hate Speech Laws

Author: Alexander Brown, Adriana Sinclair Format: Hardback Release Date: 28/08/2019

This book examines the complex relationship between politics and hate speech laws, domestic and international. How do political contexts shape understandings of what hate speech is and how to deal with it? Why do particular states enact hate speech laws and then apply, extend or reform them in the ways they do? What part does hate speech play in international affairs? Why do some but not all states negotiate, agree and ratify international hate speech frameworks or instruments? What are some of the best and worst political arguments for and against hate speech laws? Do political figures have special moral duties to refrain from hate speech? Should the use of hate speech by political figures be protected by parliamentary privilege? Should this sort of hyperpolitical hate speech be subject to the laws of the land, civil and criminal? Or should it instead be handled by parliamentary codes of conduct and procedures or even by political parties themselves? What should the codes of conduct look like? Brown and Sinclair answer these important and overlooked questions on the politics of hate speech laws, providing a substantial body of new evidence, insights, arguments, theories and practical recommendations. The primary focus is on the UK and the US but several other country contexts are also explored and compared in detail, including: Nigeria, Kenya, South Africa, India, China, Japan, Turkey, Germany, Hungary, and Italy. Methodologically, the two authors draw on approaches and concepts from a range of academic disciplines, including: law and legal theory, political theory, applied ethics, political science and sociology, international relations theory and international law.

Routledge Handbook of Socio-Legal Theory and Methods

Routledge Handbook of Socio-Legal Theory and Methods

Author: Naomi (University of Westminster, UK) Creutzfeldt Format: Hardback Release Date: 22/08/2019

Drawing on a range of approaches from the social sciences and humanities, this handbook explores theoretical and empirical perspectives that address the articulation of law in society, and the social character of the rule of law. The vast field of socio-legal studies provides multiple lenses through which law can be considered. Rather than seeking to define the field of socio-legal studies, this book takes up the experiences of researchers within the field. First-hand accounts of socio-legal research projects allow the reader to engage with diverse theoretical and methodological approaches within this fluid, interdisciplinary area. The book provides a rich resource for those interested in deepening their understanding of the variety of theories and methods available when studying law in its broadest social context, as well as setting those within the history of the socio-legal movement. The chapters consider multiple disciplinary lenses - including feminism, anthropology and sociology - as well as a variety of methodologies, including: narrative, visual and spatial, psychological, economic and epidemiological approaches. Moreover, these are applied in a range of substantive contexts such as online hate speech, environmental law, biotechnology, research in post-conflict situations, race and LGBT+ lawyers. The Handbook brings together younger contributors and some of the most well-known names in the socio-legal field. It offers a fresh perspective on the past, present and future of socio-legal studies that will appeal to students and scholars with relevant interests in a range of subjects, including law, sociology, and politics.

The Analysis of Legal Cases A Narrative Approach

The Analysis of Legal Cases A Narrative Approach

Author: Flora Di Donato Format: Hardback Release Date: 25/07/2019

This book examines the roles played by narrative and culture in the construction of legal cases and their resolution. It is articulated in two parts. Part I recalls epistemological turns in legal thinking as it moves from theory to practice in order to show how facts are constructed within the legal process. By combining interdisciplinary paradigms and methods, the work analyses the evolution of facts from their expression by the client to their translation within the lawyer-client relationship and the subsequent decision of the judge, focusing on the dynamic activity of narrative constuction among those key actors: client, lawyer and judge. Part II expands the scientific framework toward a law-and-culture-oriented perspective, illustrating how legal stories take shape in the fabric of the authentic dimensions of everyday life. The book stresses the capacity of laypeople, who in this activity are equated with clients, to shape the law, dealing not just with formal rules, but also with implicit or customary rules, in given contexts. By including the illustration of cases concerning vulnerable clients, it lays the foundations for developing a socio-clinical research programme, whose aims including enabling lay and expert actors to meet for the purposes of improving forms of collective narrations and generating more just legal systems.

Law, Drugs and the Making of Addiction Just Habits

Law, Drugs and the Making of Addiction Just Habits

Author: Kate Seear Format: Hardback Release Date: 17/07/2019

Lawyers play a vital and largely underappreciated role in constituting legal certainties about substances and `addiction', including links between alcohol and other drugs, and phenomena such as family violence. Such practices exacerbate, sustain and stabilise `addicted' realities, with a range of implications - many of them seemingly unjust - for people who use alcohol and other drugs. This book explores these issues, drawing upon data collected for a major international study on alcohol and other drugs in the law, including interviews with lawyers, magistrates and judges, analyses of case law, and legislation. Focusing on an array of legal practices, including processes of law-making, human rights deliberations, advocacy and negotiation strategies and the sentencing of offenders, and buttressed by overarching analyses of the ethics and politics of such practices, it looks at how alcohol and other drug `addiction' emerges and is concretised through the everyday work lawyers and decision makers do. Foregrounding `practices', the book also shows that law is more fragile than we might assume. It concludes by presenting a blueprint for how lawyers can rethink their advocacy practices in light of this fragility, and the opportunities it presents for remaking law, and the subjects and objects shaped by it. This ground-breaking book will be of interest not only to those studying and working within the field of alcohol and drug addiction, but also to lawyers and judges practicing in this area, and to scholars in a range of disciplines, including law, science and technology studies, sociology, gender studies and cultural studies.